Search results for 'Adaptability (Personality)*' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John E. Stewart (2007). The Future Evolution of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (8):58-92.score: 66.0
    What is the potential for improvements in the functioning of consciousness? The paper addresses this issue using global workspace theory. According to this model, the prime function of consciousness is to develop novel adaptive responses. Consciousness does this by putting together new combinations of knowledge, skills and other disparate resources that are recruited from throughout the brain. The paper's search for potential improvements in consciousness is aided by studies of a developmental transition that enhances functioning in whichever domain it occurs. (...)
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  2. Robert B. Welch, Chong Sook Choe & Daniel R. Heinrich (1974). Evidence for a Three-Component Model of Prism Adaptation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (4):700.score: 54.0
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  3. Nuala Brady Brendan Rooney, Helen Keyes (2012). Shared or Separate Mechanisms for Self-Face and Other-Face Processing? Evidence From Adaptation. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 30.0
    Evidence that self-face recognition is dissociable from general face recognition has important implications both for models of social cognition and for our understanding of face recognition. In two studies, we examine how adaptation affects the perception of personally familiar faces, and we use a visual adaptation paradigm to investigate whether the neural mechanisms underlying the recognition of one’s own and other faces are shared or separate. In Study 1 we show that the representation of personally familiar faces is rapidly updated (...)
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  4. Peter James Hills Billy Ronald Peter Walton (2012). Face Distortion Aftereffects in Personally Familiar, Famous, and Unfamiliar Faces. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 30.0
    The internal face prototype is thought to be a construction of the average of every previously viewed face (Schwaninger, Carbon, & Leder, 2003). However, the influence of the most frequently encountered faces (i.e., personally familiar faces) has been generally understated. The current research explored the face distortion after effect in unfamiliar and personally familiar faces (each subject’s parent). Twelve adult participants rated the distortion levels (distorted by shifting the eyes in the vertical axis) of a series of images that included (...)
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  5. Brendan Rooney, Helen Keyes & Nuala Brady (2012). Shared or Separate Mechanisms for Self-Face and Other-Face Processing? Evidence From Adaptation. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 30.0
    Evidence that self-face recognition is dissociable from general face recognition has important implications both for models of social cognition and for our understanding of face recognition. In two studies, we examine how adaptation affects the perception of personally familiar faces, and we use a visual adaptation paradigm to investigate whether the neural mechanisms underlying the recognition of one’s own and other faces are shared or separate. In Study 1 we show that the representation of personally familiar faces is rapidly updated (...)
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  6. Heloísa Karmelina Carvalho de Sousa, Hannia Roberta Rodrigues Paiva da Rocha & João Carlos Alchieri (2011). Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III: tradução e adaptação semântica dos itens para o Brasil. Aletheia 35:168-178.score: 28.0
    The present study aimed to translate and to adapt the personality clinical patterns scales and clinical syndromes scales of the MCMI-III to Brazil. It was used the translation and backtranslation processes, handled by bilingual translators. Then, the inventory was administered to 15 men and women ag..
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  7. Michael Potegal (2013). Revenge: An Adaptive System for Maximizing Fitness, or a Proximate Calculation Arising From Personality and Social-Psychological Processes? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):33-34.score: 26.0
    Revenge appears among a of social interactions that includes competition, alliance building (a prerequisite for tribal revenge raids), and so forth. Rather than a modular directly reflecting evolutionary fitness constraints, revenge may be (another) social cost-benefit calculation involving potential or actual aggression and proximately controlled by individual personality characteristics and beliefs that can work against fitness.
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  8. Martha C. Nussbaum (1999). How Should What Economists Call “Social Values” Be Measured? Journal of Ethics 3 (3):249-273.score: 24.0
    Most economists and some philosophers distinguish individual utilities from interpersonal social values. Even if challenges to that conceptual distinction can be met, further philosophically interesting questions arise. I pursue three in this paper, using, as context for the discussion, health economics and its attempt to discern empirically a social welfare function to help guide rationing decisions. (1) To discern these utilities and values in a manner that is morally appropriate if they are to influence rationing decisions, who should be queried? (...)
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  9. Philip V. Fellman, Lois Estabrook & Usha Dasari (forthcoming). Corporate Structure, Adaptation and Personality Type. Complexity.score: 24.0
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  10. Birgitta Fläckman, Görel Hansebo & Annica Kihlgren (2009). Struggling to Adapt: Caring for Older Persons While Under Threat of Organizational Change and Termination Notice. Nursing Inquiry 16 (1):82-91.score: 24.0
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  11. John Barresi (1999). On Becoming a Person. Philosophical Psychology 12 (1):79-98.score: 18.0
    How does an entity become a person? Forty years ago Carl Rogers answered this question by suggesting that human beings become persons through a process of personal growth and self-discovery. In the present paper I provide six different answers to this question, which form a hierarchy of empirical projects and associated criteria that can be used to understand human personhood. They are: (1) persons are constructed out of natural but organic materials; (2) persons emerge as a form of adaptation through (...)
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  12. Stevan Harnad (2002). Turing Indistinguishability and the Blind Watchmaker. In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Consciousness Evolving. John Benjamins. 3-18.score: 18.0
    Many special problems crop up when evolutionary theory turns, quite naturally, to the question of the adaptive value and causal role of consciousness in human and nonhuman organisms. One problem is that -- unless we are to be dualists, treating it as an independent nonphysical force -- consciousness could not have had an independent adaptive function of its own, over and above whatever behavioral and physiological functions it "supervenes" on, because evolution is completely blind to the difference between a conscious (...)
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  13. S. Hoffmann, E. Wascher & M. Falkenstein (2011). Personality and Error Monitoring: An Update. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:171-171.score: 18.0
    People differ considerably with respect to their ability to initiate and maintain cognitive control. A core control function is the processing and evaluation of errors from which we learn to prevent maladaptive behavior. People strongly differ in the degree of error processing, and how errors are interpreted and appraised. In the present study it was investigated whether a correlate of error monitoring, the error negativity (Ne or ERN), is related to personality factors. Therefore the EEG was measured continuously during a (...)
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  14. Jean-François Prost (2011). Adaptive Actions. AI and Society 26 (2):163-170.score: 18.0
    Adaptive Actions initiated in London in 2007 by Jean-François Prost explores alterations in the workplace, the home, and public spaces in general. Identifying the variety of these personal and found alterations in the city as different forms of adaptation creates a vocabulary for the expression of the collective imagination, through the existing urban structures therein. These ‘actions’ modify and activate the intended use of architecture and enhance the character of urban environments. They create positive tensions that test the limits of (...)
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  15. Eduardo Ortas, José M. Moneva, Roger Burritt & Joanne Tingey-Holyoak (2013). Does Sustainability Investment Provide Adaptive Resilience to Ethical Investors? Evidence From Spain. Journal of Business Ethics:1-13.score: 18.0
    Although sustainable and responsible investment (SRI) has quite recently become a hot research topic, scarcely any systematic research has been paid to the performance of this non-conventional approach to investment during the financial crisis that emerged in mid-2008 when the resilience of the financial markets was sorely tested. Such real-world resilience in practice is the subject of the current research which tests whether environmental, social and governance screens provides ethical investors with adaptive resilience in bull and bear market conditions by (...)
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  16. Jérôme Rossier, Abdoulaye Ouedraogo, Donatien Dahourou, Sabrina Verardi & Franz Meyer de Stadelhofen (2013). Personality and Personality Disorders in Urban and Rural Africa: Results From a Field Trial in Burkina Faso. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    Several studies have observed that the structure underlying both normal personality and personality disorders is stable across cultures. Most of this cross-cultural research was conducted in Western and Asian cultures. In Africa, the few studies were conducted with well-educated participants using French or English instruments. No research was conducted in Africa with less privileged or preliterate samples. The aim of this research was to study the structure and expression of normal and abnormal personality in an urban and a rural sample (...)
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  17. Thomas Ditye Claus-Christian Carbon (2012). Face Adaptation Effects Show Strong and Long-Lasting Transfer From Lab to More Ecological Contexts. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    A review on recent experiments on figural face aftereffects reveals that adaptation effects in famous faces can be quite sustainable, lasting for hours up to days. Such adaptations also seem to be highly reliable regarding test-retest designs as well as regarding the generalizability of adaptation across different adaptation routines and adaptations towards different kinds of facial properties. However, in adaptation studies conducted so far, the adaptation as well as the subsequent test phase was carried out in typical laboratory environments. Under (...)
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  18. Sytske F. Groenewald & Erwin Bulte (2013). Trust and Livelihood Adaptation: Evidence From Rural Mexico. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (1):41-55.score: 18.0
    This paper explores the relationship between trust and household adaptation strategies for a sample of respondents in a Mexican agrarian community. In particular, we analyze how levels of personalized, generalized, and institutionalized trust shape the adaptation strategies of smallholders, and find that households characterized by low levels of generalized and institutionalized trust are less likely to be involved in a diversified livelihood strategy. Instead, they tend to continue with the traditional activity of maize production. In contrast, high levels of personalized (...)
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  19. D. Floeano (2002). Ago Ergo Sum. In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Consciousness Evolving. John Benjamins.score: 16.0
  20. Zoe Drayson (2014). The Personal/Subpersonal Distinction. Philosophy Compass 9 (5):338-346.score: 14.0
    Daniel Dennett's distinction between personal and subpersonal explanations was fundamental in establishing the philosophical foundations of cognitive science. Since it was first introduced in 1969, the personal/subpersonal distinction has been adapted to fit different approaches to the mind. In one example of this, the ‘Pittsburgh school’ of philosophers attempted to map Dennett's distinction onto their own distinction between the ‘space of reasons’ and the ‘space of causes’. A second example can be found in much contemporary philosophy of psychology, where Dennett's (...)
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  21. David M. Buss (2006). The Evolutionary Genetics of Personality: Does Mutation Load Signal Relationship Load? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):409-409.score: 14.0
    The mutation-selection hypothesis may extend to understanding normal personality variation. Traits such as emotional stability, agreeableness, and conscientiousness figure strongly in mate selection and show evidence of non-additive genetic variance. They are linked with reproductively relevant outcomes, including longevity, resource acquisition, and mating success. Evolved difference-detection adaptations may function to spurn individuals whose high mutation load signals a burdensome relationship load. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  22. John G. Miller (2004). Qbq!: The Question Behind the Question: Practicing Personal Accountability in Work and in Life. G. P. Putnam's Sons.score: 14.0
    Who Moved My Cheese? showed readers how to adapt to change. Fish! helped raise flagging morale. Execution guided readers to overcome the inability to get things done. QBQ! The Question Behind the Question , already a phenomenon in its self-published edition, addresses the most important issue in business and society today: personal accountability. The lack of personal accountability has resulted in an epidemic of blame, complaining, and procrastination. No organization-or individual-can achieve goals, compete in the marketplace, fulfill a vision, or (...)
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  23. Edward T. Cokely & Adam Feltz (2009). Adaptive Variation in Judgment and Philosophical Intuition. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):356-358.score: 14.0
    Our theoretical understanding of individual differences can be used as a tool to test and refine theory. Individual differences are useful because judgments, including philosophically relevant intuitions, are the predictable products of the fit between adaptive psychological mechanisms (e.g., heuristics, traits, skills, capacities) and task constraints. As an illustration of this method and its potential implications, our target article used a canonical, representative, and affectively charged judgment task to reveal a relationship between the heritable personality trait extraversion and some compatabilist (...)
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  24. Doris McIlwain (2006). Already Filtered: Affective Immersion and Personality Differences in Accessing Present and Past. Philosophical Psychology 19 (3):381 – 399.score: 14.0
    Schemas contribute to adaptation, filtering novelty though knowledge-expectancy structures, the residue of past contingencies and their consequences. Adaptation requires a balance between flexible, dynamic context-sensitivity and the cognitive efficiency that schemas afford in promoting persistent goal pursuit despite distraction. Affects can form and disrupt schemas. Transient affective experiences systematically alter selectivity of attentiveness to the directly experienced present environment, the internal environment, and to the stored experiences of memory. Enduring personal stylistic predispositions, like implicit motives and affective schemas, influence how (...)
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  25. Edmund Wall (2011). Privacy and the Moral Right to Personal Autonomy. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):69-85.score: 14.0
    I argue that the moral right to privacy is the moral right to consent to access by others to one’s personal information. Although this thesis is relatively simple and already implicit in considerations about privacy, it has, nevertheless, been overlooked by philosophers. In the paper, I present and defend my account of the moral right to privacy, respond to possible objections to it, and attempt to show its advantages over two recent accounts: one by Steve Matthews and the other by (...)
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  26. Donna L. Goodwin (2008). Self-Regulated Dependency: Ethical Reflections on Interdependence and Help in Adapted Physical Activity. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (2):172 – 184.score: 14.0
    This article explores the ethical implications of the goal of functional independence for persons with disabilities. Central to independence is protection against the fear and uncertainty of future dependency and assurance of a level of social status. Moreover, independence reflects individualism, autonomy and control of decisions about one's life. Dependency, in contrast, implies the inability to do things for oneself and reliance on others to assist with tasks of everyday life. The ethics of independence are explored within the context of (...)
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  27. David M. Buss (2005). Sex Differences in the Design Features of Socially Contingent Mating Adaptations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):278-279.score: 14.0
    Schmitt's study provides strong support for sexual strategies theory (Buss & Schmitt 1993) – that men and women both have evolved a complex menu of mating strategies, selectively deployed depending on personal, social, and ecological contexts. It also simultaneously refutes social structural theories founded on the core premise that women and men are sexually monomorphic in their psychology of human mating. Further progress depends on identifying evolved psychological design features sensitive to the costs and benefits of pursuing each strategy from (...)
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  28. Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (1975). Adaptivity and Self-Knowledge. Inquiry 18 (1):1-22.score: 14.0
    In this paper the view is presented that self?knowledge has no special status; its varieties constitute distinctive classes, differing from one another more sharply than each does from analogous knowledge of others. Most cases of self?knowledge are best understood contextually, subsumed under such other activities as decision?making and socializing. First person, present tense ?reports? of sensations, intentions, and thoughts are primarily adaptively expressive, only secondarily truth?functional. The last section sketches some of the disadvantages, as well as some of the advantages, (...)
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  29. Janice Richardson, Selves, Persons, Individuals : A Feminist Critique of the Law of Obligations.score: 14.0
    This thesis examines some of the contested meanings of what it is to be a self, person and individual. The law of obligations sets the context for this examination. One of the important aspects of contemporary feminist philosophy has been its move beyond highlighting inconsistencies in political and legal theory, in which theoretical frameworks can be shown to rely upon an ambiguous treatment of women. The feminist theorists whose work is considered use these theoretical weaknesses as a point of departure (...)
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  30. Ejgil Jespersen & Mike McNamee (2008). Philosophy, Adapted Physical Activity and Dis/Ability. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (2):87 – 96.score: 14.0
    In the formation of the multi-disciplinary field that investigates the participation of disabled persons in all forms of physical activity, little ethical and philosophical work has been published. This essay serves to contextualise a range of issues emanating from adapted physical activity (APA) and disability sports. First, we offer some general historical and philosophical remarks about the field which serve to situate those issues at the crossroads between the philosophy of disability and the philosophy of sports. Secondly, we bring brief (...)
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  31. Kate Lindemann (2001). Persons with Adult-Onset Head Injury: A Crucial Resource for Feminist Philosophers. Hypatia 16 (4):105-123.score: 14.0
    : The effects of head injury, even mild traumatic brain injury, are wide-ranging and profound. Persons with adult-onset head injury offer feminist philosophers important perspectives for philosophical methodology and philosophical research concerning personal identity, mind-body theories, and ethics. The needs of persons with head injury require the expansion of typical teaching strategies, and such adaptations appear beneficial to both disabled and non-disabled students.
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  32. Donald Peterson, Autism, Dilogic and Persons.score: 14.0
    The syndrome of autism was first systematically identified in the 1940's (Kanner 1943), and has been the focus of a broad range of work since that time (Rutter 1999). Its symptomatology is seemingly diverse, and involves a rough division between 'personal' and 'nonpersonal' tendencies. In the personal category are difficulties in understanding and interacting with other persons, socialisation, empathy and communication. In the non-personal category are difficulties in adaptability, occasional special abilities, and a wide range of peculiarities in learning, (...)
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  33. R. Shayna Rosenbaum Jennifer S. Rabin, Nicole Carson, Asaf Gilboa, Donald T. Stuss (2012). Imagining Other People's Experiences in a Person with Impaired Episodic Memory: The Role of Personal Familiarity. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 14.0
    Difficulties remembering one’s own experiences via episodic memory may affect the ability to imagine other people’s experiences during theory of mind (ToM). Previous work shows that the same set of brain regions recruited during tests of episodic memory and future imagining are also engaged during standard laboratory tests of ToM. However, hippocampal amnesic patients who show deficits in past and future thinking, show intact performance on ToM tests, which involve unknown people or fictional characters. Here we present data from a (...)
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  34. Guglielmo Tamburrini (2009). Brain to Computer Communication: Ethical Perspectives on Interaction Models. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 2 (3):137-149.score: 12.0
    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) enable one to control peripheral ICT and robotic devices by processing brain activity on-line. The potential usefulness of BCI systems, initially demonstrated in rehabilitation medicine, is now being explored in education, entertainment, intensive workflow monitoring, security, and training. Ethical issues arising in connection with these investigations are triaged taking into account technological imminence and pervasiveness of BCI technologies. By focussing on imminent technological developments, ethical reflection is informatively grounded into realistic protocols of brain-to-computer communication. In particular, (...)
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  35. Norman Kreitman (2011). Intrinsic Aesthetic Value Revisted. Metaphilosophy 42 (4):470-478.score: 12.0
    Abstract: Every sentient organism needs constantly to re-assess its environment in order to adjust to any changes in it and to ascertain which aspects are, or become, salient for its current purposes. Such adaptation is of basic evolutionary importance, but for human beings it can be difficult to achieve in the face of radical novelty or when different frames of reference are in conflict. Art by virtue of its integrated structure presents examples of how a partial unification of experience may (...)
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  36. Inti A. Brazil, Laurence T. Hunt, Berend H. Bulten, Roy Pc Kessels, Ellen Ra de Bruijn & Rogier B. Mars (2013). Psychopathy-Related Traits and the Use of Reward and Social Information: A Computational Approach. Frontiers in Psychology 4:952.score: 12.0
    Psychopathy is often linked to disturbed reinforcement-guided adaptation of behaviour in both clinical and non-clinical populations. Recent work suggests that these disturbances might be due to a deficit in actively using information to guide changes in behaviour. However, how much information is actually used to guide behaviour is difficult to observe directly. Therefore, we used a computational model to estimate the use of information during learning. Thirty-six female subjects were recruited based on their total scores on the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (...)
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  37. Brian Garvey (2003). Darwinian Functions and Freudian Motivations. Biology and Philosophy 18 (3):427-444.score: 12.0
    Badcock, and Nesse and Lloyd, have argued that there are important points of agreement between Freud's theory of the mind and a theory of mind suggested by adaptive reasoning. Buller, on the other hand, draws attention to the need to avoid confusing an adaptive rationale with an unconscious motivation. The present paper attempts to indicate what role adaptive reasoning might have to play in justifying psychoanalytic claims. First, it is argued that psychoanalytic claims cannot be justified by the clinical experience (...)
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  38. Tania Singer Marisa Przyrembel, Jonathan Smallwood, Michael Pauen (2012). Illuminating the Dark Matter of Social Neuroscience: Considering the Problem of Social Interaction From Philosophical, Psychological, and Neuroscientific Perspectives. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 12.0
    Successful human social interaction depends on our capacity to understand other people’s mental states and to anticipate how they will react to our actions. Despites its importance to the human condition, there are still quite a few debates about how we actually solve the problem of understanding other peoples’ actions, feelings and thoughts. Here we consider this problem from philosophical, psychological, and neuroscientific perspectives. In a critical review we show that attempts to draw parallels across these complementary levels of analysis (...)
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  39. M. Patrão Neves (2004). Cultural Context and Consent: An Anthropological View. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (1):93-98.score: 12.0
    The theme of consent is, without question, associated with the origins of bioethics and is one of its most significant paradigms that has remained controversial to the present, as is confirmed by the proposal for its debate during the last World Congress of Bioethics. Seen broadly as a compulsory minimum procedure in the field of biomedical ethics, even today it keeps open the issues that it has raised from the start: whether it is really necessary and whether it can be (...)
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  40. Anjan Chatterjee Adam J. Woods, Matthew Lehet (2012). Context Modulates the Contribution of Time and Space in Causal Inference. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 12.0
    Humans use kinematic temporal and spatial information from the environment to infer the causal dynamics (e.g., force) of an event. We hypothesize that the basis for these inferences are malleable and modulated by contextual temporal and spatial information. Specifically, the present research investigates whether the extent of a person's ongoing experience with direct causal events (e.g., temporally contiguous and spatially continuous) alters their use of time and space in judgments of causality. Participants made inferences of causality on animated launching events (...)
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  41. Harry Van Der Bruggen & Guy Widdershoven (2005). Being a Parkinson's Patient: Immobile and Unpredictably Whimsical Literature and Existential Analysis. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (3):289-301.score: 12.0
    What is characteristic of being aParkinson’s patient? This article intends toanswer this question by means of an analysis ofnovels about people with Parkinson’s disease,personal accounts, and scientific publications.The texts were analyzed from anexistential-phenomenological perspective, usingan adapted version of the existential analysis.Being a Parkinson’s patient is apparentlycharacterized by an existential paradox: lifeappears simultaneously immobile andunpredictably whimsical. This may manifestitself in the person’s corporeality, in hisbeing-in-time and in-space, in his relating tothings and events, his life-world, and in hisbeing-together-with-others as an individual.Finally, some (...)
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  42. Adam J. Woods, Matthew Lehet & Anjan Chatterjee (2012). Context Modulates the Contribution of Time and Space in Causal Inference. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 12.0
    Humans use kinematic temporal and spatial information from the environment to infer the causal dynamics (e.g., force) of an event. We hypothesize that the basis for these inferences are malleable and modulated by contextual temporal and spatial information. Specifically, the present research investigates whether the extent of a person's ongoing experience with direct causal events (e.g., temporally contiguous and spatially continuous) alters their use of time and space in judgments of causality. Participants made inferences of causality on animated launching events (...)
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  43. Timothy D. Wilson (2002). Strangers to Ourselves: Discovering the Adaptive Unconscious. Harvard University Press.score: 10.0
    This is not your psychoanalyst's unconscious.
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  44. Neil Van Leeuwen (2007). The Spandrels of Self-Deception: Prospects for a Biological Theory of a Mental Phenomenon. Philosophical Psychology 20 (3):329 – 348.score: 8.0
    Three puzzles about self-deception make this mental phenomenon an intriguing explanatory target. The first relates to how to define it without paradox; the second is about how to make sense of self-deception in light of the interpretive view of the mental that has become widespread in philosophy; and the third concerns why it exists at all. In this paper I address the first and third puzzles. First, I define self-deception. Second, I criticize Robert Trivers' attempt to use adaptionist evolutionary psychology (...)
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  45. Stan Klein (forthcoming). Autonoesis and Belief in a Personal Past: An Evolutionary Theory of Episodic Memory Indices. Review of Philosophy and Psychology.score: 8.0
    In this paper I discuss philosophical and psychological treatments of the question "how do we decide that an occurrent mental state is a memory and not, say a thought or imagination?" This issue has proven notoriously difficult to resolve, with most proposed indices, criteria and heuristics failing to achieve consensus. Part of the difficulty, I argue, is that the indices and analytic solutions thus far offered seldom have been situated within a well-specified theory of memory function. As I hope to (...)
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  46. Ineke Bolt & Maartje Schermer (2009). Psychopharmaceutical Enhancers: Enhancing Identity? Neuroethics 2 (2):103-111.score: 8.0
    The use of psychopharmaceuticals to enhance human mental functioning such as cognition and mood has raised a debate on questions regarding identity and authenticity. While some hold that psychopharmaceutical substances can help users to ‘become who they really are’ and thus strengthen their identity and authenticity, others believe that the substances will lead to inauthenticity, normalization, and socially-enforced adaptation of behaviour and personality. In light of this debate, we studied how persons who actually have experience with the use of psychopharmaceutical (...)
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  47. Havi Carel (2007). Can I Be Ill and Happy? Philosophia 35 (2):95-110.score: 8.0
    Can one be ill and happy? I use a phenomenological approach to provide an answer to this question, using Merleau-Ponty’s distinction between the biological and the lived body. I begin by discussing the rift between the biological body and the ill person’s lived experience, which occurs in illness. The transparent and taken for granted biological body is problematised by illness, which exposes it as different from the lived experience of this body. I argue that because of this rift, the experience (...)
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  48. Joel Smith, Phenomenology. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 8.0
    In its central use “phenomenology” names a movement in twentieth century philosophy. A second use of “phenomenology” common in contemporary philosophy names a property of some mental states, the property they have if and only if there is something it is like to be in them. Thus, it is sometimes said that emotional states have a phenomenology while belief states do not. For example, while there is something it is like to be angry, there is nothing it is like to (...)
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  49. William Cornwell, Making Sense of the Other: Husserl, Carnap, Heidegger, and Wittgenstein. Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy (Conference Proceedings).score: 8.0
    Phenomenology and logical positivism both subscribed to an empirical-verifiability criterion of mental or linguistic meaning. The acceptance of this criterion confronted them with the same problem: how to understand the Other as a subject with his own experience, if the existence and nature of the Other's experiences cannot be verified. Husserl tackled this problem in the Cartesian Meditations, but he could not reconcile the verifiability criterion with understanding the Other's feelings and sensations. Carnap's solution was to embrace behaviorism and eliminate (...)
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  50. Toby Svoboda (2012). Is Aerosol Geoengineering Ethically Preferable to Other Climate Change Strategies? Ethics and the Environment 17 (2):111-135.score: 8.0
    In this paper, I address the question of whether aerosol geoengineering (AG) ought to be deployed as a response to climate change. First, I distinguish AG from emissions mitigation, adaptation, and other geoengineering strategies. Second, I discuss advantages and disadvantages of AG, including its potential to result in substantial harm to some persons. Third, I critique three arguments against AG deployment, suggesting reasons why these arguments should be rejected. Fourth, I consider an argument that, in scenarios in which all available (...)
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