Search results for 'Adenosine' (try it on Scholar)

5 found
Sort by:
  1. L. Sobrevia, Simon M. Jarvis & D. L. Yudilevich, Adenosine Transport in Cultured Human Umbilical Vein Endothelia-Cells is Reduced in Diabetes.score: 12.0
    Adenosine transport in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was characterized and shown to be mediated by a single facilitated diffusion mechanism. Initial rates of adenosine influx at 22 degrees C were saturable [apparent Michaelis constant, 69 +/- 10 mu M; maximum velocity (V-max), 600 +/- 70 pmol.10(6) cells(-1).s(-1)] and inhibited by nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR). Formycin B had an unusually high affinity [inhibitory constant K-i), 18 +/- 4.3 mu M], whereas inosine had a low affinity (K-i, 440 +/- (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Koscak Maruyama (1991). The Discovery of Adenosine Triphosphate and the Establishment of Its Structure. Journal of the History of Biology 24 (1):145 - 154.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. David J. Mellor, Tamara J. Diesch, Alistair J. Gunn & Laura Bennet (2005). The Importance of 'Awareness' for Understanding Fetal Pain. Brain Research Reviews 49 (3):455-471.score: 6.0
  4. L. F. Barros, D. L. Yudilevich, Simon M. Jarvis, N. Beaumont, J. D. Young & S. A. Baldwin, Immunolocalisation of Nucleoside Transporters in Human Placental Trophoblast and Endothelial Cells: Evidence for Multiple Transporter Isoforms.score: 3.0
    Polyclonal antibodies raised against the human erythrocyte nucleoside transporter were used to investigate the distribution of the nucleoside transporters in the placenta. Immunoblots of brush-border membranes isolated from the human syncytiotrophoblast revealed a cross-reactive species that co-migrated with the erythrocyte nucleoside transporter as a broad band of apparent M(r) 55,000. In contrast, no labelling was detected in basal membranes containing a similar number of equilibrative nucleoside transporters as assessed by nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR)-binding. The absence of cross-reactive epitopes in basal membranes and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Geoffrey Burnstock (2012). Purinergic Signalling: Its Unpopular Beginning, its Acceptance and its Exciting Future. Bioessays 34 (3):218-225.score: 3.0
    Adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) was identified in 1970 as the transmitter responsible for non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic neurotransmission in the gut and bladder and the term ‘purinergic’ was coined. Purinergic cotransmission was proposed in 1976 and ATP is now recognized as a cotransmitter in all nerves in the peripheral and central nervous systems. P1 (adenosine) and P2 (ATP) receptors were distinguished in 1978. Cloning of these receptors in the early 1990s was a turning point in the acceptance of the purinergic signalling (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation