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  1. Stephanie Bell, Adrian Carter, Rebecca Mathews, Coral Gartner, Jayne Lucke & Wayne Hall (2014). Views of Addiction Neuroscientists and Clinicians on the Clinical Impact of a 'Brain Disease Model of Addiction'. Neuroethics 7 (1):19-27.
    Addiction is increasingly described as a “chronic and relapsing brain disease”. The potential impact of the brain disease model on the treatment of addiction or addicted individuals’ treatment behaviour remains uncertain. We conducted a qualitative study to examine: (i) the extent to which leading Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians accept the brain disease view of addiction; and (ii) their views on the likely impacts of this view on addicted individuals’ beliefs and behaviour. Thirty-one Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians (10 females (...)
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  2. Adrian Carter, Rebecca Mathews, Stephanie Bell, Jayne Lucke & Wayne Hall (2014). Control and Responsibility in Addicted Individuals: What Do Addiction Neuroscientists and Clinicians Think? Neuroethics 7 (2):205-214.
    Impaired control over drug use is a defining characteristic of addiction in the major diagnostic systems. However there is significant debate about the extent of this impairment. This qualitative study examines the extent to which leading Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians believe that addicted individuals have control over their drug use and are responsible for their behaviour. One hour semi-structured interviews were conducted during 2009 and 2010 with 31 Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians (10 females and 21 males; 16 with (...)
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  3. Carla Meurk, Adrian Carter, Wayne Hall & Jayne Lucke (2014). Public Understandings of Addiction: Where Do Neurobiological Explanations Fit? Neuroethics 7 (1):51-62.
    Developments in the field of neuroscience, according to its proponents, offer the prospect of an enhanced understanding and treatment of addicted persons. Consequently, its advocates consider that improving public understanding of addiction neuroscience is a desirable aim. Those critical of neuroscientific approaches, however, charge that it is a totalising, reductive perspective–one that ignores other known causes in favour of neurobiological explanations. Sociologist Nikolas Rose has argued that neuroscience, and its associated technologies, are coming to dominate cultural models to the extent (...)
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  4. Adrian Carter & Wayne Hall (2012). Avoiding Selective Ethical Objections to Nudges. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):12-14.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 12-14, February 2012.
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  5. Adrian Carter, Polly Ambermoon & Wayne D. Hall (2011). Drug-Induced Impulse Control Disorders: A Prospectus for Neuroethical Analysis. Neuroethics 4 (2):91-102.
    There is growing evidence that dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) used to treat Parkinson’s Disease can cause compulsive behaviours and impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as pathological gambling, compulsive buying and hypersexuality. Like more familiar drug-based forms of addiction, these iatrogenic disorders can cause significant harm and distress for sufferers and their families. In some cases, people treated with DRT have lost their homes and businesses, or have been prosecuted for criminal sexual behaviours. In this article we first examine the evidence (...)
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  6. Adrian Carter, Emily Bell, Eric Racine & Wayne Hall (2011). Ethical Issues Raised by Proposals to Treat Addiction Using Deep Brain Stimulation. Neuroethics 4 (2):129-142.
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as a potential treatment of drug addiction on the basis of its effects on drug self-administration in animals and on addictive behaviours in some humans treated with DBS for other psychiatric or neurological conditions. DBS is seen as a more reversible intervention than ablative neurosurgery but it is nonetheless a treatment that carries significant risks. A review of preclinical and clinical evidence for the use of DBS to treat addiction suggests that more animal (...)
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  7. Benjamin Capps & Adrian Carter (2010). Standing at the Precipice: A Cautionary Note About Incremental Goods. American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (3):46-48.
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  8. Adrian Carter, Perry Bartlett & Wayne Hall (2009). Scare-Mongering and the Anticipatory Ethics of Experimental Technologies. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):47-48.
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  9. Adrian Carter & Wayne Hall (2007). The Social Implications of Neurobiological Explanations of Resistible Compulsions. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):15 – 17.
    The authors comments on several articles on addiction. Research suggests that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The authors maintain that a proper study of addiction must include a neurobiological model of addiction to draw the attention of bioethicists and addiction neurobiologists. They also state that more addiction neuroscientists like S. E. Hyman are needed as they understand the limits of their research. Accession Number: 24077921; Authors: Carter, Adrian 1; Email Address: adrian.carter@uq.edu.au Hall, Wayne 1; Affiliations: (...)
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  10. William Grey, Wayne Hall & Adrian Carter (2007). Persons and Personification. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):57-58.
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  11. Wayne Hall & Adrian Carter (2007). Debunking Alarmist Objections to the Pharmacological Prevention of Ptsd. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):23 – 25.
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