22 found
Sort by:
  1. Adrian Haddock (2012). Meaning, Justification, and'Primitive Normativity'. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 86 (1):147-174.
    I critically discuss two claims which Hannah Ginsborg makes on behalf of her account of meaning in terms of ‘primitive normativity’(2011; 2012): first, that it avoids the sceptical regress articulated by Kripke's Wittgenstein; second, that it makes sense of the thought—central to Kripke's Wittgenstein—that ‘meaning is normative’, in a way which shows this thought not only to be immune from recent criticisms but also to undermine reductively naturalistic theories of content. In the course of the discussion, I consider and attempt (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Adrian Haddock (2011). Davidson and Idealism. In Joel Smith & Peter Sullivan (eds.), Transcendental Philosophy and Naturalism. Oxford University Press. 26--41.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Adrian Haddock (2011). The Disjunctive Conception of Perceiving. Philosophical Explorations 14 (1):23-42.
    John McDowell's conception of perceptual knowledge commits him to the claim that if I perceive that P then I am in a position to know that I perceive that P. In the first part of this essay, I present some reasons to be suspicious of this claim - reasons which derive from a general argument against 'luminosity' - and suggest that McDowell can reject this claim, while holding on to almost all of the rest of his conception of perceptual knowledge, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Adrian Haddock (2011). The Knowledge That a Man has of His Intentional Actions. In Anton Ford, Jennifer Hornsby & Frederick Stoutland (eds.), Essays on Anscombe's Intention. Harvard University Press.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Adrian Haddock (2010). What Is Disjunctivism? Philosophy Now 81:21-22.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.) (2010). Social Epistemology. Oxford University Press, USA.
    The fifteen new essays presented in this volume aim to show the fertility and variety of social epistemology and to set the agenda for future research.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Duncan Pritchard, Alan Millar & Adrian Haddock (eds.) (2010). Social Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    Recent epistemology has reflected a growing interest in the social dimension of the subject. This volume presents new work by leading philosophers on a wide range of topics in social epistemology, such as the nature of testimony, the epistemology of disagreement, and the social genealogy of the concept of knowledge.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Adrian Haddock (2009). Experience and the World's Own Language: A Critique of John McDowell's Empiricism, by Richard Gaskin. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):332-336.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Adrian Haddock, Extending the Space of Reasons: Comments on Chapter Four of Understanding People.
    Wilfrid Sellars employs the metaphor of the space of reasons to express a certain conception of knowledge: “in characterising an episode or state as that of knowing … one is placing it in the logical space of reasons, of justifying and being able to justify what one says”.1 A growing number of philosophers employ the same metaphor to express a conception of at least some (other) mental states: in characterising a state as that of belief, or intention, one is placing (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Adrian Haddock (2009). McDowell, Transcendental Philosophy, and Naturalism. Philosophical Topics 37 (1):63-75.
    First paragraph: I want to discuss the place of naturalism in the philosophy of John McDowell. There are some people who think McDowell is a naturalist in name only.1 But I think there is an aspect of his thinking which merits the title. And I think it is an aspect he could well do without, in light of his recent attempt to understand his own philosophy as a Hegelian radicalization of Kantian themes.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.) (2009). Epistemic Value. Oxford University Press.
    Recent epistemology has reflected a growing interest in issues about the value of knowledge and the values informing epistemic appraisal. Is knowledge more valuable that merely true belief or even justified true belief? Is truth the central value informing epistemic appraisal or do other values enter the picture? Epistemic Value is a collection of previously unpublished articles on such issues by leading philosophers in the field. It will stimulate discussion of the nature of knowledge and of directions that might be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Giuseppina D'oro, Mark Day, Luke O'sullivan, Jakub Capek, Nick Tosh, Adrian Haddock & Robert John Inkpen (2008). Philosophy of History. Philosophia 36 (4).
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Adrian Haddock (2008). Danto's Dialectic. Philosophia 36 (4):483-493.
    Arthur C. Danto’s Analytical Philosophy of History has a Kantian ambition: to state the conditions that make historical knowledge possible and to show “the unhappy destiny” that attends attempts to extend modes of representation beyond these conditions. Even though Danto’s book fails to achieve this ambition, it succeeds in making a number of important—if neglected—suggestions in the course of its attempt. One concerns the significance of the progressive tense for our thinking about human agency. Another concerns the way agency can (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Adrian Haddock (2008). McDowell and Idealism. Inquiry 51 (1):79 – 96.
    John McDowell espouses a certain conception of the thinking subject: as an embodied, living, finite being, with a capacity for experience that can take in the world, and stand in relations of warrant to subjects' beliefs. McDowell presents this conception of the subject as requiring a related conception of the world: as not located outside the conceptual sphere. In this latter conception, idealism and common-sense realism are supposed to coincide. But I suggest that McDowell's conception of the subject scuppers this (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Adrian Haddock (2008). Thought's Footing: A Theme in Wittgenstein's 'Philosophical Investigations' – Charles Travis. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):546–550.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Adrian Haddock & Fiona Macpherson (eds.) (2008). Disjunctivism: Perception, Action, Knowledge. Oxford University Press.
  17. Adrian Haddock & Fiona Macpherson (2008). Introduction: Varieties of Disjunctivism. In Adrian Haddock & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Disjunctivism: Perception, Action, Knowledge. Oxford University Press.
    Inspired by the writings of J. M. Hinton (1967a, 1967b, 1973), but ushered into the mainstream by Paul Snowdon (1980–1, 1990–1), John McDowell (1982, 1986), and M. G. F. Martin (2002, 2004, 2006), disjunctivism is currently discussed, advocated, and opposed in the philosophy of perception, the theory of knowledge, the theory of practical reason, and the philosophy of action. But what is disjunctivism?
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Adrian Haddock (2005). At One with Our Actions, but at Two with Our Bodies. Philosophical Explorations 8 (2):157 – 172.
    Jennifer Hornsby's account of human action frees us from the temptation to think of the person who acts as 'doing' the events that are her actions, and thereby removes much of the allure of 'agent causation'. But her account is spoiled by the claim that physical actions are 'tryings' that cause bodily movements. It would be better to think of physical actions and bodily movements as identical; but Hornsby refuses to do this, seemingly because she thinks that to do so (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Adrian Haddock (2005). Lifting the Fog. The Philosophers' Magazine 29 (29):91-91.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Adrian Haddock (2004). Rethinking the “Strong Programme” in the Sociology of Knowledge. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (1):19-40.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Adrian Haddock (2002). Rewriting the Past: Retrospective Description and its Consequences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 32 (1):3-24.
    This article seeks to answer the following questions: is Quentin Skinner right to claim that actions in the past should not be described by means of concepts not available at the time those actions occurred? And is Ian Hacking right to claim that such descriptions do not merely describe but actually change the past? The author begins by arguing that it is not clear precisely what Skinner is claiming and shows how, under the pressure of criticism, his methodological strictures collapse (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Adrian Haddock (1999). Being and Worth Andrew Collier. Historical Materialism 5 (1):345-358.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation