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Adrienne M. Martin [13]Adrienne Martin [8]
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Profile: Adrienne Martin (University of Pennsylvania)
  1. Adrienne Martin, The Intricacies of Hope.
    Many people believe hope’s most important function is to bolster us in despairinducing circumstances. A related but less dramatic view is that instilling or reinforcing hope for a state of affairs is a good way to get people to act to promote that state of affairs. I propose that we conceive of hope as, most paradigmatically, the expression of desire in imagination. I then trace through the implications of this conception for, first, how hope influences motivation and, second, what forms (...)
     
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  2. Adrienne M. Martin, Please Cite Published Version.
    In their classic, Principles of Biomedical Ethics (now in its fifth edition), Beauchamp and Childress, describe a puzzling case: A man who generally exhibits normal behavior patterns is involuntarily committed to a mental institution as the result of bizarre self-destructive behavior (pulling out an eye and cutting off a hand). This behavior results from his unusual religious beliefs. … [H]is peculiar actions follow “reasonably” from his religious beliefs. …While analysis in terms of limited competence might at first appear plausible, such (...)
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  3. Adrienne Martin, Hope, Fantasy, and Commitment1 Adrienne M. Martin Adrm@Sas.Upenn.Edu.
    The standard foil for recent theories of hope is the belief-desire analysis advocated by Hobbes, Day, Downie, and others. According to this analysis, to hope for S is no more and no less than to desire S while believing S is possible but not certain. Opponents of the belief-desire analysis argue that it fails to capture one or another distinctive feature or function of hope: that hope helps one resist the temptation to despair;2 that hope engages the sophisticated capacities of (...)
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  4. Adrienne Martin, Syllabus.
    Ethical or moral assessments are ubiquitous, from the international political arena, where world leaders debate the morality of the U.S.’s invasion of Iraq, to private family interactions, where children accuse their parents of being unfair. In this class, we engage with this essential component of our lives philosophically. Our activity is philosophical in that we seek to understand moral questions before trying to answer them, and our primary aim is always to hone our critical reasoning skills. These skills will serve (...)
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  5. Adrienne Martin, Wanting to Pull Clouds: The Moral Psychology of Hope.
    The extent of the approval with which Western culture views the attitude of hope can scarcely be exaggerated. Hope is seen as that which sustains us through wartime, death camps, slavery, natural disaster, extreme disease and disability—it is a light, a beacon, the last spark that fuels us when all else has failed. Hope is also seen as a moral and spiritual virtue—hoping for moral progress in this world, and salvation in the next, is at the heart of a meaningful (...)
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  6. Adrienne M. Martin, Love, Kantian Style.
    We are interestingly ambivalent about romantic love, in a number of cases. Consider a man who abuses his wife, but is also passionate about her and easily distraught at the thought of losing her. There is some sense in which he loves her, but another in which he absolutely does not. Consider, too, a longtime partner who feels she has rather suddenly “fallen out of love” with the person to whom she was once devoted. She continues to feel there is (...)
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  7. Adrienne M. Martin (forthcoming). Tales Publicly Allowed. Hastings Center Report.
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  8. Susan Sauvé Meyer & Adrienne M. Martin (2013). Emotion and the Emotions. In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  9. Catherine Hickey & Adrienne M. Martin (2011). Devotion or Disease? Hastings Center Report 41 (2):18-19.
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  10. Adrienne M. Martin (2011). Commentary. Hastings Center Report 41 (2):19-19.
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  11. Adrienne M. Martin (2011). Hopes and Dreams. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 83 (1):148 - 173.
    It is a commonplace in both the popular imagination and the philosophical literature that hope has a special kind of motivational force. This commonplace underwrites the conviction that hope alone is capable of bolstering us in despairinducing circumstances, as well as the strategy of appealing to hope in the political realm. In section 1, I argue that, to the contrary, hope’s motivational essence is not special or unique—it is simply that of an endorsed desire. The commonplace is not entirely mistaken, (...)
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  12. Adrienne M. Martin (2011). Owning Up and Lowering Down. Journal of Philosophy 107 (10):534-553.
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  13. Anne Tallontire, Maggie Opondo, Valerie Nelson & Adrienne Martin (2011). Beyond the Vertical? Using Value Chains and Governance as a Framework to Analyse Private Standards Initiatives in Agri-Food Chains. Agriculture and Human Values 28 (3):427-441.
    The significance of private standards and associated local level initiatives in agri-food value chains are increasingly recognised. However whilst issues related to compliance and impact at the smallholder or worker level have frequently been analysed, the governance implications in terms of how private standards affect national level institutions, public, private and non-governmental, have had less attention. This article applies an extended value chain framework for critical analysis of Private Standards Initiatives (PSIs) in agrifood chains, drawing on primary research on PSIs (...)
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  14. Adrienne M. Martin (2010). Owning Up and Lowering Down: The Power of Apology. Journal of Philosophy 107 (10):534-553.
    Apologies are strange. They are, in a certain sense, very small. An apology is just a gesture—a set of words, a physical posture, perhaps a gift. But an apology can also be very powerful—this power is implicit in the facts that it can be difficult to offer an apology and that, when we are wronged, we may want an apology very much. More, even we have been severely wronged, we are sometimes willing to forgive or pardon the wrongdoer, if we (...)
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  15. Adrienne Martin (2008). Hope and Exploitation. Hastings Center Report 38 (5):49-55.
    How do we encourage patients to be hopeful without exploiting their hope? A medical researcher or a pharmaceutical company can take unfair advantage of someone's hope by much subtler means than simply giving misinformation. Hope shapes deliberation, and therefore can make deliberation better or worse, by the deliberator's own standards of deliberation.
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  16. Adrienne Martin (2008). No Virtue in Fatalism: Conservative Bioethics and Eric Cohen's *In the Shadow of Progress*. [REVIEW] Science Progress.
    Refusing to pursue recent and possible future developments in medical research is itself a morally momentous decision—and that inaction has consequences Cohen and other right-wing thinkers refuse to acknowledge. -/- .
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  17. Adrienne Martin (2007). Review of Barbara Herman, Moral Literacy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (9).
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  18. Adrienne M. Martin (2007). Tales Publicly Allowed: Competence, Capacity, and Religious Belief. Hastings Center Report 37 (1):33-40.
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  19. Adrienne M. Martin (2007). Taking Religion Seriously-Reply. Hastings Center Report 37 (4):5-6.
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  20. Adrienne M. Martin (2006). How to Argue for the Value of Humanity. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):96–125.
    Significant effort has been devoted to locating a good argument for Kant's Formula of Humanity. In this paper, I contrast two arguments, based on Kant's text, for the Formula of Humanity. The first, which I call the 'Valued Ends' argument, is an influential and appealing argument developed most notably by Christine Korsgaard and Allen Wood. Notwithstanding the appeal and influence of this argument, it ultimately fails on several counts. I therefore present as an alternative the 'Autonomy' argument, which is largely (...)
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  21. Adrienne M. Martin & Jehanna Peerzada (2005). The Expressive Meaning of Enhancement. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):25 – 27.
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