Search results for 'Aesthetic concepts' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  82
    Derek Matravers (1996). Aesthetic Concepts and Aesthetic Experiences. British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (3):265-279.
    In this paper I want to return to some well-worn ideas; specifically, the attempt to show that there is a distinctive subject-matter of the aesthetic via consideration of the difference between aesthetic and non-aesthetic concepts. The classic exposition of this distinction is Frank Sibley's 'Aesthetic Concepts'. Sibley claimed that, given a set of relevant terms, there will be widespread non-collusive agreement as to which are aesthetic and which non-aesthetic. Non-aesthetic terms include (...)
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  2.  10
    Nick Zangwill (2014). Music, Metaphor, and Aesthetic Concepts. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (1):1-11.
    The aesthetic realist interprets many descriptions of music as metaphorical descriptions of aesthetic properties of music. I argue that aesthetic realism requires that nonaesthetic words are used to express both aesthetic and nonaesthetic concepts. But having distinguished the concepts, some plausible account must be given of their relation. A causal account of the relation between the possession of aesthetic and nonaesthetic concepts provides this, since the concepts are distinct but connected. I (...)
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  3. Emily Brady & Jerrold Levinson (eds.) (2001). Aesthetic Concepts: Essays After Sibley. Oxford University Press.
    Exploring key topics in contemporary aesthetics, this work analyzes the issues that arise from the unique works of Frank Sibley (1923-1996), who developed a distinctive aesthetic theory through a number of papers published between 1955 and 1995. Here, thirteen philosophical aestheticians bring Sibley's insight into a contemporary framework, exploring the ways his ideas foster important new discussion about issues in aesthetics. This collection will interest anyone interested in philosophy, art theory, and art criticism.
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  4.  16
    Joseph Thomas Tolliver (2012). Tales of the Ineffable: Crafting Concepts in Aesthetic Experience. Philosophical Studies 161 (1):153-162.
    Lehrer has argued that in having an aesthetic experience of an art work we come to have ineffable knowledge of what the art object is like. This knowledge is made possible by our ability to conceptualize the art object by means of a process Lehrer calls, "exemplarization", that involves using an experience to craft a general representation of that very experience. I suggest that exemplar concepts function as vehicles of ineffable representation only if they have two features: (i) (...)
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  5. Phillip Montague (1979). Learning Aesthetic Concepts and Justifying Aesthetic Judgments. Journal of Aesthetic Education 13 (1):45.
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  6. Frank Sibley (1959). Aesthetic Concepts. Philosophical Review 68 (4):421-450.
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  7. Frank Sibley (1963). Aesthetic Concepts: A Rejoinder. Philosophical Review 72 (1):79-83.
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  8.  8
    Lesley Wright (2003). Aesthetic Implicitness in Sport and the Role of Aesthetic Concepts. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 30 (1):83-92.
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  9. Peter Kivy (1979). Aesthetic Concepts: Some Fresh Considerations. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 37 (4):423-432.
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  10. J. F. Logan (1967). More on Aesthetic Concepts. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 25 (4):401-406.
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  11. H. R. G. Schwyzer (1963). Sibley's "Aesthetic Concepts". Philosophical Review 72 (1):72-78.
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  12.  96
    R. David Broiles (1964). Frank Sibley's "Aesthetic Concepts". Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 23 (2):219-225.
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  13.  70
    Roman Bonzon (2009). Thick Aesthetic Concepts. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (2):191-199.
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  14.  2
    Derek Matravers (2002). Aesthetic Concepts: Essays After Sibley. Mind 111 (444):912-916.
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  15.  74
    R. Meager (1970). Aesthetic Concepts. British Journal of Aesthetics 10 (4):303-322.
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  16.  55
    Aaron Meskin (2004). Aesthetic Concepts: Essays After Sibley. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (1):90-93.
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  17.  42
    Derek Matravers (2002). Review: Aesthetic Concepts: Essays After Sibley. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (444):912-916.
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  18.  3
    Patricia Sloane (1970). Aesthetic Concepts and Education. Journal of Critical Analysis 2 (3):48-50.
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  19. Ralph Alexander Smith (ed.) (1970). Aesthetic Concepts and Education. Urbana,University of Illinois Press.
  20.  23
    Gary Stahl (1971). Sibley's "Aesthetic Concepts": An Ontological Mistake. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 29 (3):385-389.
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  21.  11
    Ronald Hepburn (2003). Brady, Emily, and Jerrold Levinson, Eds. Aesthetic Concepts: Essays After Sibley. Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):635-637.
  22.  1
    I. M. Fowlie & J. G. Warry (1964). Greek Aesthetic Theory: A Study of Callistic and Aesthetic Concepts in the Works of Plato and Aristotle. Philosophical Quarterly 14 (54):87.
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  23.  11
    Peter Kivy (1981). Secondary Senses and Aesthetic Concepts: A Reply to Professor Tilghman. Philosophical Investigations 4 (1):35-38.
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  24.  9
    Isabel C. Hungerland (1962). The Logic of Aesthetic Concepts. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 36:43 - 66.
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  25.  6
    E. Schellekens (2002). Aesthetic Concepts--Essays After Sibley. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (4):536-538.
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  26.  4
    H. Ll Hudson-Williams (1964). Aesthetic Theory in Plato and Aristotle J. G. Warry: Greek Aesthetic Theory. A Study of Callistic and Aesthetic Concepts in the Works of Plato and Aristotle. London: Methuen, 1962. Cloth, 18s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 14 (01):33-34.
  27.  1
    Ondřej Dadejík & Štěpán Kubalík (2013). Some Remarks on Descriptive and Negative Aesthetic Concepts: A Critical Note. Estetika 2:206-211.
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  28. Rekha Jhanji (1979). Wittgenstein on Aesthetic Concepts. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 6 (3):545.
     
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  29. Mark Meli (2003). Japanese Aesthetic Concepts and Phenomenological Inquiry. Analecta Husserliana 78:243-252.
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  30. Sonia Rouve (1972). "Aesthetic Concepts and Education": Ralph A. Smith. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 12 (2):195.
     
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  31.  2
    G. Pollock (2004). Thinking the Feminine: Aesthetic Practice as Introduction to Bracha Ettinger and the Concepts of Matrix and Metramorphosis. Theory, Culture and Society 21 (1):5-65.
    Bracha Ettinger is an Israeli-born Paris-based artist, analyst and feminist theorist who has produced over the last decade a major theoretical intervention through a tripartite practice. This article offers an expository introduction and overview of core aspects of her theoretical contribution while relating it to major trends in feminist and general cultural theory of subjectivity, hysteria, memory, trauma and the aesthetic. Organized in several parts, each section addresses the developing vocabulary, terminology and significance of her work. With core (...) are Matrix, metramorphosis, trans-subjectivity, co-poïesis, co-emergence and co-affection, Ettinger’s theory opens out beyond the blind spots of advanced feminist thought. From its independent and original theorization of subjectivity-as-encounter and an-other sexual difference, Bracha Ettinger challenges our attempts to think about femininity associated with the work of Julia Kristeva and Luce Irigaray. Linked to, but distinct from, the philosophical speculations of Deleuze and Levinas, this work creates a transferential theoretical space for Jewish and feminine difference, sexuality, subjectivity and the traumatic residues of modern catastrophe that has major repercussions for cultural, aesthetic, ethical, political and psychoanalytic theory. (shrink)
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  32.  1
    Karen A. Hamblen (1986). Exploring Contested Concepts for Aesthetic Literacy. Journal of Aesthetic Education 20 (2):67-76.
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  33.  3
    Tim Thornton (2007). An Aesthetic Grounding for the Role of Concepts in Experience in Kant, Wittgenstein and McDowell. Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 12 (2).
  34.  1
    Noboru Tanaka (2007). Concepts of Aesthetic Education: Japanese and European Perspectives ‐ Edited by Yasuo Imai and Christoph Wulf. British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (4):482-483.
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  35. Krzysztof Guczalski (2012). Henryk Elzenberg as a Forerunner of Anglo-American Concepts of Expression; Emotional Colouring as an Aesthetic Phenomenon. Estetika:191-231.
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  36.  30
    Louise McNally & Isidora Stojanovic (forthcoming). Aesthetic Adjectives. In James Young (ed.), The Semantics of Aesthetic Judgment. Oxford University Press
    Among semanticists and philosophers of language, there has been a recent outburst of interest in predicates such as delicious, called predicates of personal taste (PPTs, e.g. Lasersohn 2005). Somewhat surprisingly, the question of whether or how we can distinguish aesthetic predicates from PPTs has hardly been addressed at all in this recent work. It is precisely this question that we address. We investigate linguistic criteria that we argue can be used to delineate the class of specifically aesthetic adjectives. (...)
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  37. Christy Mag Uidhir & Cameron Buckner (2014). A Portrait of the Artist as an Aesthetic Expert. In Gregory Currie, Matthew Kieran & Aaron Meskin (eds.), Aesthetics and the Sciences. Oxford University Press
    For the most part, the Aesthetic Theory of Art—any theory of art claiming that the aesthetic is a descriptively necessary feature of art—has been repudiated, especially in light of what are now considered traditional counterexamples. We argue that the Aesthetic Theory of Art can instead be far more plausibly recast by abandoning aesthetic-feature possession by the artwork for a claim about aesthetic-concept possession by the artist. This move productively re-frames and re-energizes the debate surrounding the (...)
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  38. Rafael De Clercq (2002). The Concept of an Aesthetic Property. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (2):167–176.
    This paper provides an analysis of the concept of an aesthetic property in non-aesthetic terms.
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  39.  56
    Daniel Whiting (2015). The Glass is Half Empty: A New Argument for Pessimism About Aesthetic Testimony. British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (1):91-107.
    Call the view that it is possible to acquire aesthetic knowledge via testimony, optimism, and its denial, pessimism. In this paper, I offer a novel argument for pessimism. It works by turning attention away from the basis of the relevant belief, namely, testimony, and toward what that belief in turn provides a basis for, namely, other attitudes. In short, I argue that an aesthetic belief acquired via testimony cannot provide a rational basis for further attitudes, such as admiration, (...)
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  40. Melissa McBay Merritt (2010). Kant on the Transcendental Deduction of Space and Time: An Essay on the Philosophical Resources of the Transcendental Aesthetic. Kantian Review 14 (2):1-37.
    I take up Kant's remarks about a " transcendental deduction" of the "concepts of space and time". I argue for the need to make a clearer assessment of the philosophical resources of the Aesthetic in order to account for this transcendental deduction. Special attention needs to be given to the fact that the central task of the Aesthetic is simply the "exposition" of these concepts. The Metaphysical Exposition reflects upon facts about our usage to (...)
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  41.  80
    Samantha Matherne (2013). The Inclusive Interpretation of Kant's Aesthetic Ideas. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):21-39.
    In the Critique of the Power of Judgment, Kant offers a theory of artistic expression in which he claims that a work of art is a medium through which an artist expresses an ‘aesthetic idea’. While Kant’s theory of aesthetic ideas often receives rather restrictive interpretations, according to which aesthetic ideas can either present only moral concepts, or only moral concepts and purely rational concepts, in this article I offer an ‘inclusive interpretation’ of (...) ideas, according to which they can present not only moral and purely rational concepts but also empirical concepts and emotions related to our ordinary experience. Although this latter class of experience-oriented aesthetic ideas has been neglected, I argue that recognizing the role it plays in Kant’s account is crucial for understanding his views not only of artistic production and our experience of art but also of the value he takes art to have for our ordinary experience of the world, others, and our own selves. What is more, insofar as the inclusive interpretation brings to light Kant’s acknowledgement of the close connection between experience and art, it reveals that his overall view of art is more plausible than is often thought, and recommends it as worthy of further consideration. (shrink)
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  42.  25
    Andrea Sauchelli (2014). Sibley on ‘Beautiful’ and ‘Ugly’. Philosophical Papers 43 (3):377-404.
    Frank Sibley's ideas have been particularly influential among contemporary philosophers interested in aesthetics. Most studies, however, have focused only on his earlier works. In this essay, I explore Sibley's account of the adjectives ‘beautiful’ and ‘ugly’, paying particular attention to three papers that have only recently been published and that have not yet received adequate attention. In particular, I discuss his account of the adjective ‘beautiful’, which relies on the controversial notion of an aesthetic ideal. In addition, I discuss (...)
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  43.  55
    Anna Bergqvist (2010). Why Sibley is Not a Generalist After All. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):1-14.
    In his influential paper, ‘General Criteria and Reasons in Aesthetics’, Frank Sibley outlines what is taken to be a generalist view (shared with Beardsley) such that there are general reasons for aesthetic judgement, and his account of the behaviour of such reasons, which differs from Beardsley's. In this paper my aim is to illuminate Sibley's position by employing a distinction that has arisen in meta-ethics in response to recent work by Jonathan Dancy in particular. Contemporary research involves two related (...)
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  44.  69
    Jennifer A. McMahon (2010). The Classical Trinity and Kant's Aesthetic Formalism. Critical Horizons 11 (3):419-441.
    I identify two mutually exclusive notions of formalism in Kant’s Critique of Aesthetic Judgement: a thin concept of aesthetic formalism and a thick concept of aesthetic formalism. Arguably there is textual support for both concepts in Kant’s third critique. I offer interpretations of three key elements in the Critique of Aesthetic Judgement which support a thick formalism. The three key elements are: Harmony of the Faculties, Aesthetic Ideas and Sensus Communis. I interpret these (...) in relation to the conditions for theoretical Reason, the conditions for moral motivation and the conditions for intersubjectivity, respectively. I conclude that there is no support for a thin concept of aesthetic formalism when the key elements of Kant’s Critique of Aesthetic Judgement are understood in the context of his broader critical aims. (shrink)
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  45.  20
    Andrew Sneddon (2010). Thick Concepts and Holism About Reasons. Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (4):461-468.
    Thick moral concepts are a topic of particular disagreement in discussions of reasons holism. These concepts, such as justice, are called “thick” because they have both evaluative and descriptive aspects. Thin moral concepts, such as good, are purely evaluative. The disagreement concerns whether the fact that an action is, for example, just always a reason in favor of performing that action. The present argument follows Jonathan Dancy’s strategy of connecting moral reasons and concepts to those in (...)
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  46.  15
    Charles DeBord (2012). Geist and Communication in Kant's Theory of Aesthetic Ideas. Kantian Review 17 (2):177-190.
    In his Critique of the Power of Judgement, Kant explicates the creation of works of fine art (schöne Kunst) in terms of aesthetic ideas. His analysis of aesthetic ideas claims that they are not concepts (Begriffe) and are therefore not definable or describable in determinate language. Nevertheless, Kant claims that aesthetic ideas are communicable via spirit (Geist), a special mental ability he associates with artistic genius. This paper argues that Kant's notion of Geist is central to (...)
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  47.  94
    Malcolm Budd (2006). The Characterization of Aesthetic Qualities by Essential Metaphors and Quasi-Metaphors. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (2):133-143.
    My paper examines a vital but neglected aspect of Frank Sibley's pioneering account of aesthetic concepts. This is the claim that many aesthetic qualities are such that they can be characterized adequately only by metaphors or ‘quasi-metaphors’. Although there is no indication that Sibley embraced it, I outline a radical, minimalist conception of the experience of perceiving an item as possessing an aesthetic quality, which, I believe, has wide application and which would secure Sibley's position for (...)
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  48.  94
    Robert Stecker (2006). Aesthetic Experience and Aesthetic Value. Philosophy Compass 1 (1):1–10.
    What possesses aesthetic value? According to a broad view, it can be found almost anywhere. According to a narrower view, it is found primarily in art and is applied to other items by courtesy of sharing some of the properties that make artworks aesthetically valuable. In this paper I will defend the broad view in answering the question: how should we characterize aesthetic value and other aesthetic concepts? I will also criticize some alternative answers.
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  49.  87
    Yvonne Sherratt (2007). Adorno's Aesthetic Concept of Aura. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (2):155-177.
    Philosophers within the discipline of the history of philosophy have long since demonstrated a preoccupation with the history of aesthetic ideas. However, not all aesthetic concepts in 19th- and 20th-century thought have been given an adequate analysis. One concept which, while attracting interest in literary theory debates, has rarely been mentioned in history of philosophy debates, is that of aura . The reason for the marginal role of aura in present debates is due no doubt to the (...)
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  50.  30
    Bart Vandenabeele (2007). Schopenhauer on the Values of Aesthetic Experience. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):565-582.
    In this essay, I argue that Schopenhauer’s view of the aesthetic feelings of the beautiful and the sublime shows how a “dialectical” interpretation that homogenizes both aesthetic concepts and reduces thediscrepancy between both to merely quantitative differences is flawed. My critical analysis reveals a number of important tensions in both Schopenhauer’s own aesthetic theory—which does not ultimately succeed in “merging” Plato’s and Kant’s approaches—and the interpretation that unjustly reduces the value of aesthetic experience to a (...)
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