Search results for 'Aesthetic experience' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Roger W. H. Savage (2012). Aesthetic Experience, Mimesis and Testimony. Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies 3 (1):172-193.score: 240.0
    In this article, I relate the demand that Paul Ricoeur suggests mimesis places on the way we think about truth to the idea that the work of art is a model for thinking about testimony. By attributing a work’s epoché of reality to the work of imagination, I resolve the impasse that arises from attributing music, literature, and art’s distance from the real to their social emancipation. Examining the conjunction, in aesthetic experience, of the communicability and the exemplarity (...)
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  2. Marcus Düwell (1999). Aesthetic Experience, Medical Practice, and Moral Judgement. Critical Remarks on Possibilities to Understand a Complex Relationship. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):161-168.score: 216.0
    The aim of the paper is to examine the possible relationships between the different dimensions of aesthetics on the one hand, and medical practice and medical ethics on the other hand. Firstly, I consider whether the aesthetic perception of the human body is relevant for medical practice. Secondly, a possible analogy between the artistic process and medical action is examined. The third section concerns the comparison between medical ethical judgements and aesthetic judgement of taste. It is concluded that (...)
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  3. Corey Abel (forthcoming). Whatever It Turns Out To Be: Oakeshott on Aesthetic Experience. In Leslie MArsh Paul Franco (ed.), Whatever It Turns Out To Be: Oakeshott on Aesthetic Experience. Penn State UP.score: 210.0
    This essay presents a multifold argument on Oakeshott's aesthetics. First, his famous essay "The Voice of Poetry" deals more explicitly and thoroughly with art than is often acknowledged. Second, aesthetic experience is a competitor to philosophic insight in so far as it discloses the coherence of a world of ideas through its uniting form and content; yet "art" remains a mode. Third, the essay points out that the absence of history from any major role in Oakeshott's most important (...)
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  4. Mikel Dufrenne (1973). The Phenomenology of Aesthetic Experience. Evanston [Ill.]Northwestern University Press.score: 208.0
    Translator's Foreword The Phenomenology of Aesthetic Experience capped one of the most remarkable decades in the history of modern philosophy. ...
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  5. Ha Poong Kim (2011). Beyond Words, Things, Thoughts, Feelings: Essays on Aesthetic Experience. Sussex Academic Press.score: 208.0
    It is a state of mind thus markedly different from our everyday experience, where thought processes impinge on our consciousness. In this book, Ha Poong Kim shares his thoughts on aesthetic experience.
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  6. R. N. Austgard (2006). The Aesthetic Experience of Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 7 (1):11–19.score: 198.0
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  7. David Sackris (2013). Category Independent Aesthetic Experience: The Case of Wine. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (1-2):111-120.score: 192.0
    Kendall Walton’s “Categories of Art” seeks to situate aesthetic properties contextually. As such, certain knowledge is required to fully appreciate the aesthetic properties of a work, and without that knowledge the ‘correct’ or ‘true’ aesthetic properties of a work cannot be appreciated. The aim of this paper is to show that the way Walton conceives of his categories and art categorization is difficult to square with certain kinds of aesthetic experience—kinds of experience that seems (...)
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  8. James Scott Johnston (2002). John Dewey and the Role of Scientific Method in Aesthetic Experience. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (1):1-15.score: 188.0
    In this paper I examine a controversy ongoingwithin current Deweyan philosophy of educationscholarship regarding the proper role and scopeof science in Dewey's concept of inquiry. Theside I take is nuanced. It is one that issensitive to the importance that Dewey attachesto science as the best method of solvingproblems, while also sensitive to thosestatements in Dewey that counter a wholesalereductivism of inquiry to scientific method. Iutilize Dewey's statements regarding the placeaccorded to inquiry in aesthetic experiences ascharacteristic of his method, as (...)
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  9. Mordechai Gordon (2012). Exploring the Relationship Between Humor and Aesthetic Experience. Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (1):111-121.score: 186.0
    The connection between humor and aesthetic experience has already been recognized by several thinkers and aesthetic educators. For instance, humor theorist John Morreall writes that "humor is best understood as itself a kind of aesthetic experience, equal in value at least to any other kind of aesthetic experience."1 For Morreall, both humor and aesthetic experience involve the use of the imagination, are accompanied by a sense of freedom, and often lead to (...)
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  10. Michael H. Mitias (ed.) (1988). Aesthetic Quality and Aesthetic Experience. Königshausen & Neumann.score: 184.0
    PREFACE One of the most difficult yet sadly neglected questions in the extant spectrum of contemporary aesthetic analysis is the relationship between ...
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  11. Jessica R. Feldman (2002). Victorian Modernism: Pragmatism and the Varieties of Aesthetic Experience. Cambridge University Press.score: 184.0
    In Victorian Modernism: Pragmatism and the Varieties of Aesthetic Experience Jessica Feldman sheds a pragmatist light on the relation between the Victorian age and Modernism by dislodging truistic notions of Modernism as an art of crisis, rupture, elitism and loss. She examines aesthetic sites of Victorian Modernism - including workrooms, parlours, friendships, and family relations as well as printed texts and paintings - as they develop through interminglings and continuities as well as gaps and breaks. Examining the (...)
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  12. Kimberley Curtis (1999). Our Sense of the Real: Aesthetic Experience and Arendtian Politics. Cornell University Press.score: 184.0
    Arendt's innovation is to recognize that this countenancing of others is an aesthetic experience that creates the political world.Curtis plumbs the relevance of ...
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  13. Elvira Brattico, Brigitte Bogert & Thomas Jacobsen (2013). Toward a Neural Chronometry for the Aesthetic Experience of Music. Frontiers in Psychology 4 (May).score: 184.0
    Music is often studied as a cognitive domain alongside language. The emotional aspects of music have also been shown to be important, but views on their nature diverge. For instance, the specific emotions that music induces and how they relate to emotional expression are still under debate. Here we propose a mental and neural chronometry of the aesthetic experience of music initiated and mediated by external and internal contexts such as intentionality, background mood, attention, and expertise. The initial (...)
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  14. Jonathan Owen Clark (2013). Aesthetic Experience, Subjective Historical Experience and the Problem of Constructivism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (1):57-81.score: 184.0
    This article takes as its starting point the recent work of Frank Ankersmit on subjective historical experience. Such an experience, which Ankersmit describes as a ‘sudden obliteration of the rift between present and past’ is connected strongly with the Deweyan theory of art as experiential, which contains an account of aesthetic experience as affording a similar breakdown in the polarization of the subject and object of experience. The article shows how other ideas deriving from the (...)
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  15. Nava Rubin Edward A. Vessel, G. Gabrielle Starr (2012). The Brain on Art: Intense Aesthetic Experience Activates the Default Mode Network. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 184.0
    Aesthetic responses to visual art comprise multiple types of experiences, from sensation and perception to emotion and self-reflection. Moreover, aesthetic experience is highly individual, with observers varying significantly in their responses to the same artwork. Combining fMRI and behavioral analysis of individual differences in aesthetic response, we identify two distinct patterns of neural activity exhibited by different subnetworks. Activity increased linearly with observers’ ratings (4-level scale) in sensory (occipito-temporal) regions. Activity in the striatum also varied linearly (...)
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  16. Edward A. Vessel, G. Gabrielle Starr & Nava Rubin (2012). The Brain on Art: Intense Aesthetic Experience Activates the Default Mode Network. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 184.0
    Aesthetic responses to visual art comprise multiple types of experiences, from sensation and perception to emotion and self-reflection. Moreover, aesthetic experience is highly individual, with observers varying significantly in their responses to the same artwork. Combining fMRI and behavioral analysis of individual differences in aesthetic response, we identify two distinct patterns of neural activity exhibited by different subnetworks. Activity increased linearly with observers’ ratings (4-level scale) in sensory (occipito-temporal) regions. Activity in the striatum also varied linearly (...)
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  17. Bernardo Barros Coelho de Oliveira (2011). Judgment in Contemporary Aesthetic Experience. Filosofia Unisinos 12 (1):38-47.score: 184.0
    The article presents central concepts of the “Critique of Aesthetic Judgment,” the first part of the Critique of Judgment by Kant, arguing for the possibility of a fruitful discussion between this work and the problems of aesthetic experience in the contemporary world. It emphasizes Kant’s claims about the judgments of taste concerning works of art and tries to remove some prejudices that hinder the dialogue between this work and current problems.
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  18. Noël Carroll (2002). Aesthetic Experience Revisited. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (2):145-168.score: 182.0
    In this article I divide theories of aesthetic experience into three sorts: the affectoriented approach, the axiologically oriented approach, and the content-oriented approach. I then go on to defend a version of the content-oriented approach.
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  19. Derek Matravers (2003). The Aesthetic Experience. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (2):158-174.score: 182.0
    This paper joins recent attempts to defend a notion of aesthetic experience. It argues that phenomenological facts and facts about aesthetic value support the Kantian notion that aesthetic experience lies between, but differs from, pleasures of the agreeable and pleasures stemming from cognitions. It then shows that accounts by Beardsley, Levinson, and Savile fail to resolve clear tensions that surface in attempting to characterize such an experience. An account of aesthetic experience—as involving (...)
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  20. Paul Guyer (2003). The Cognitive Element in Aesthetic Experience: Reply to Matravers. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):412-418.score: 182.0
    ...as a Kantian model of aesthetic experience a free play of the cognitive faculties with beliefs or propositions. This is false to Kant, whose conception is better interpreted as a free play with elements of cognition such as intuitions and concepts. More importantly, an account closer to Kant's original provides a less restrictive model of aesthetic experience than Matravers's interpretation does, and therefore one that more readily fits a much larger number of cases.
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  21. Paisley Livingston (2004). C. I. Lewis and the Outlines of Aesthetic Experience. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (4):378-392.score: 182.0
    The current essay describes aspects of C. I. Lewis’s rarely cited contributions to aesthetics, focusing primarily on the conception of aesthetic experience developed in An Analysis of Knowledge and Valuation. Lewis characterized aesthetic value as a proper subset of inherent value, which he understood as the power to occasion intrinsically valued experiences. He distinguished aesthetic experiences from experiences more generally in terms of eight conditions. Roughly, he proposed that aesthetic experiences have a highly positive, preponderantly (...)
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  22. Alan H. Goldman (2013). The Broad View of Aesthetic Experience. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (4):323-333.score: 182.0
    Peter Kivy and Noël Carroll advocate a narrow view of aesthetic experience according to which it consists mainly in attention to formal properties. Excluded are cognitive and moral properties. I defend the broader view that includes the latter properties. I argue first that cognition and moral assessment can be inseparable in experience from grasp of form and expressiveness. Second, Kivy and Carroll must extend the notion of form itself beyond ordinary usage to accommodate acknowledged aesthetic (...). Third, the broad view has a more impressive historical lineage than the narrow view. Fourth, aesthetic experience is appreciation of aesthetic value, and the latter is more plausibly analyzed in a broad way. (shrink)
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  23. Gianluca Consoli (2014). The Emergence of the Modern Mind: An Evolutionary Perspective on Aesthetic Experience. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (1):37-55.score: 182.0
    On the basis of archaeological data and cognitive research, this article proposes an evolutionary story about aesthetic experience, arguing three intertwined theses. Aesthetic experience is adaptive; that is, it represents a specific implementation of the epistemic goal of knowing. It refunctionalizes antecedents and precursors: play and dreaming, technology and the ability to manipulate, and proto-aesthetic elements and aesthetic preferences. Mind and aesthetic experience co-evolve; that is, aesthetic experience requires mind reading (...)
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  24. Mara Miller (2014). Agency, Identity, and Aesthetic Experience in Three Post-Atomic Japanese Narratives: Yasunari Kawabata’s The Sound of the Mountain, Rio Kushida’s Thread Hell, and the Anime Film Barefoot Gen. In Nguyen Minh (ed.), New Essays in Japanese Aesthetics. Lexington Books.score: 182.0
    Since World War II Japanese artists have employed two seemingly contradictory ways of working, using aesthetics, materials, artistic methods technologies, and approaches that are either radically innovative and wildly experimental, or traditional/classical. Many other artists, however, in a move that seems paradoxical. have combined the two to explore the new themes of the post-atomic period. Three narrative works dealing with the effects of the World War II war effort and the atomic bombings that ended them, Yasunari Kawabata’s novel The Sound (...)
     
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  25. Roman Ingarden (1961). Aesthetic Experience and Aesthetic Object. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21 (3):289-313.score: 180.0
    The purpose here is to give a thorough phenomenological account of the aesthetic experience. The difference between cognitive perception of a real object and the aesthetic experience of an esthetic object is discussed at length. Elements and phases of an esthetic experience are delineated; illustrations of a preliminary emotion of esthetic experience are given, All of which suggest a fundamental change of attitude. From normal perceiving to esthetic perceiving there is a change from categorical (...)
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  26. Jeremy H. Smith (2006). Michel Henry's Phenomenology of Aesthetic Experience and Husserlian Intentionality. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (2):191 – 219.score: 180.0
    In Voir l'invisible Michel Henry applies his philosophy of autoaffection (which is both inspired by, and critical of, Husserl) to the realm of aesthetics. Henry claims that autoaffection, as non-objective experience, is essential not only to self-experience, but also to the experience of objects and their qualities. Intentionality tempts us to experience objects merely from the 'outside', but aesthetic experience returns us to the inner life of objects as a lived experience. On the (...)
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  27. Richard Glauser (2002). Aesthetic Experience in Shaftesbury: Richard Glauser. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):25–54.score: 180.0
    [Richard Glauser] Shaftesbury's theory of aesthetic experience is based on his conception of a natural disposition to apprehend beauty, a real 'form' of things. I examine the implications of the disposition's naturalness. I argue that the disposition is not an extra faculty or a sixth sense, and attempt to situate Shaftesbury's position on this issue between those of Locke and Hutcheson. I argue that the natural disposition is to be perfected in many different ways in order to be (...)
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  28. Alison Ross (2010). The Modern Concept of Aesthetic Experience: From Ascetic Pleasure to Social Criticism. Critical Horizons 11 (3):333-339.score: 180.0
    This paper examines the use of “pleasure” as the distinguishing mark of aesthetic experience in post-Kantian philosophy. It shows how the distinctive features of aesthetic experience, such as pleasure, qualify this experience as a platform for social criticism. The key argument is that the autonomy of the aesthetic experience is not “false”, rather it is paradoxical in the strong sense that the fact of its communicative efficacy, which follows from distinctive, “autonomous” aesthetic (...)
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  29. Bart Vandenabeele (2007). Schopenhauer on the Values of Aesthetic Experience. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):565-582.score: 180.0
    In this essay, I argue that Schopenhauer’s view of the aesthetic feelings of the beautiful and the sublime shows how a “dialectical” interpretation that homogenizes both aesthetic concepts and reduces thediscrepancy between both to merely quantitative differences is flawed. My critical analysis reveals a number of important tensions in both Schopenhauer’s own aesthetic theory—which does not ultimately succeed in “merging” Plato’s and Kant’s approaches—and the interpretation that unjustly reduces the value of aesthetic experience to a (...)
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  30. Richard Shusterman (2006). Aesthetic Experience: From Analysis to Eros. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (2):217–229.score: 180.0
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  31. Rob van Gerwen (1995). Kant's Regulative Principle of Aesthetic Excellence: The Ideal Aesthetic Experience. Kant-Studien 86 (3):331-345.score: 180.0
    It is rather intriguing that we will often try to persuade people of what we find beautiful, even though we do not believe that they may subsequently base their judgement of taste on our testimony. Typically, we think that the experience of beauty is such that we cannot leave it to others to be had. Moreover, we are often aware of the contingency of our own judgements’ foundation in our own experience. Nevertheless, we do think that certain (...), evaluative conceptions do relate to specific experiences in a non-trivial way, especially that of aesthetic excellence. Now certain analytical aestheticians ascribe truth values to aesthetic judgements of various kinds. Such ascription would evidently have a bearing on the problem of aesthetic experience’s relevance for evaluation, as we may in the end be better off neglecting the experiential altogether in virtue of treating aesthetic values in objectivist ways, as natural properties, or as reducible to such properties, descriptions of which will then indeed be true or false.1 However, I think that it is too early yet to bury subjectivism. So let us instead defend it and try to get a better grasp on its suppositions. In this we may profit from ideas advanced by David Wiggins, who neither denies the role played by objective properties, nor neglects the subjective import. According to him, aesthetic values are somehow kinds of relations, which are established by an elaborate process of criticism and refinement of perceptions of, and feelings toward specific natural properties.2 The argument in this paper suggests that the analysis of a paradigmatic pair regarding ‘aesthetic excellence’ provides us with inter-. (shrink)
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  32. James Phillips (2010). Restoring Place to Aesthetic Experience: Heidegger's Critique of Rilke. Critical Horizons 11 (3):341-358.score: 180.0
    Atypical among Heidegger’s numerous discussions of poets is the condemnation of Rilke in the 1942-43 lecture course Parmenides. At stake is the definition of “the open” (das Offene): Rilke reserves the open for animals as freedom from conceptual determinacy, whereas Heidegger reserves it for human beings as the place of Being in which things first appear as what they are. The open, for Heidegger, names the existential conception of place (as distinct from a geographical point) and features in his life-long (...)
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  33. Haewan Lee (2008). Characterizing Aesthetic Experience. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 1:161-167.score: 180.0
    In this paper, I suggest what I think is an appropriate characterization of aesthetic experience. I do this by critically assessing Noel Carroll’s position and Gary Iseminger’s counterposition. Carroll claims that aesthetic experience should be understood only as an experience of the aesthetic content of an object. Although I accept many of Carroll’s points, I find his position unconvincing. I contend that, in addition to the content, positive value plays a significant role as a (...)
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  34. Anthony Savile (2002). Aesthetic Experience in Shaftesbury: Anthony Savile. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):55–74.score: 180.0
    [Richard Glauser] Shaftesbury's theory of aesthetic experience is based on his conception of a natural disposition to apprehend beauty, a real 'form' of things. I examine the implications of the disposition's naturalness. I argue that the disposition is not an extra faculty or a sixth sense, and attempt to situate Shaftesbury's position on this issue between those of Locke and Hutcheson. I argue that the natural disposition is to be perfected in many different ways in order to be (...)
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  35. Wendy Lynne Lee (2006). On Ecology and Aesthetic Experience: A Feminist Theory of Value and Praxis. Ethics and the Environment 11 (1):21-41.score: 180.0
    : My aim is to develop a feminist theory of value—an axiology—which unites two notions that seem to have little in common for a theorizing whose ultimate goal is justice-driven emancipatory action, namely, the ecological and the aesthetic. In this union lies the potential for a critical feminist political praxis capable of appreciating not only the value of human life, but those relationships upon which human and nonhuman life depend. A vital component of this praxis is, I argue, the (...)
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  36. Joseph Thomas Tolliver (2012). Tales of the Ineffable: Crafting Concepts in Aesthetic Experience. Philosophical Studies 161 (1):153-162.score: 180.0
    Lehrer has argued that in having an aesthetic experience of an art work we come to have ineffable knowledge of what the art object is like. This knowledge is made possible by our ability to conceptualize the art object by means of a process Lehrer calls, "exemplarization", that involves using an experience to craft a general representation of that very experience. I suggest that exemplar concepts function as vehicles of ineffable representation only if they have two (...)
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  37. Zofia Rosińska (2011). Leopold Blaustein: Imaginary Representations, A Study on the Border of Psychology and Aesthetics; The Role of Perception in Aesthetic Experience. Estetika 48 (2):199-243.score: 180.0
    The introduction to Leopold Blaustein’s (1905–1944) two essays in this issue of Estetika contains a general biographical note about the author and his philosophical affiliations, as well as a brief description of his particular interests within philosophical aesthetics. Blaustein’s method of philosophical inquiry is described as analytical phenomenology. Three interconnected fields of aesthetics in Blaustein’s works are emphasized: the theory of aesthetic perception, the theory of attitudes (towards the imaginary world and the reproduced one) and the theory of representation, (...)
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  38. Dan Eugen Ratiu (2013). Remapping the Realm of Aesthetics: On Recent Controversies About the Aesthetic and Aesthetic Experience in Everyday Life. Estetika 50 (1):3-26.score: 180.0
    This article addresses two controversial open questions in philosophical aesthetics: the nature and value of the aesthetic and of aesthetic experience when approached from the standpoint of ‘aesthetics of everyday life’ (AEL). Contrasting ‘strong’ AEL accounts that consider them radically different from those in the sphere of art, I claim that extending the realm and scope of aesthetics towards everyday life does not necessarily dispense with the concepts of the aesthetic and aesthetic experience as (...)
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  39. Tim L. Elcombe (2012). Sport, Aesthetic Experience, and Art as the Ideal Embodied Metaphor. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (2):201-217.score: 180.0
    Despite a prevalence of articles exploring links between sport and art in the 1970s and 1980s, philosophers in the new millennium pay relatively little explicit attention to issues related to aesthetics generally. After providing a synopsis of earlier debates over the questions ?is sport art?? and ?are aesthetics implicit to sport??, a pragmatically informed conception of aesthetic experience will be developed. Aesthetic experience, it will be argued, vitally informs sport ethics, game logic, and participant meaning. Finally, (...)
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  40. Ian Woodward & David Ellison (2010). Aesthetic Experience, Transitional Objects and the Third Space: The Fusion of Audience and Aesthetic Objects in the Performing Arts. Thesis Eleven 103 (1):45-53.score: 180.0
    Aesthetic experience has been relativized and marginalized by recent social and cultural theory. As less attention has been paid to understanding the nature of aesthetic experience than mapping the distributed social correlates of tastes, its transformative potential and capacity to animate actors’ imaginations and actions goes unexplored. In this paper we draw upon a large number of in-depth interviews with performing arts audiences around Australia to investigate the language and discourse used to describe aesthetic experiences. (...)
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  41. Martin Eshleman (1966). Aesthetic Experience, The Aesthetic Object and Criticism. The Monist 50 (2):281-298.score: 180.0
    The aesthetic experience, In husserl's language, Brackets or suspends the natural standpoint. Consciousness perceives the work of art not as an object of the factual world, But as a man-Made artifact to be enjoyed just for certain immediately experienced qualities. The work of art is neither a real physical entity nor a real psychical entity, But a purely intentional object, For which the physical object serves as a substratum. The critic must recreate the purely intentional object by completing (...)
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  42. Eva Kit Wah Man (2007). Rethinking Art and Values: A Comparative Revelation of the Origin of Aesthetic Experience (From the Neo-Confucian Perspectives). Filozofski Vestnik 2.score: 180.0
    In his article, "The End of Aesthetic Experience" (1997) Richard Shusterman studies the contemporary fate of aesthetic experience, which has long been regarded as one of the core concepts of Western aesthetics till the last half century. It has then expanded into an umbrella concept for aesthetic notions such as the sublime and the picturesque. I agree with Shusterman that aesthetic experience has become the island of freedom, beauty, and idealistic meaning in an (...)
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  43. Robert Ginsberg (1986). Experiencing Aesthetically, Aesthetic Experience, and Experience in Aesthetics. In. In Michael H. Mitias (ed.), Possibility of the Aesthetic Experience. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic. 61--78.score: 180.0
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  44. Michael H. Mitias (1986). Can We Speak of 'Aesthetic Experience'?. In. In , Possibility of the Aesthetic Experience. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic. 47--58.score: 180.0
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  45. G. Gabrielle Starr (2013). Feeling Beauty: The Neuroscience of Aesthetic Experience. The Mit Press.score: 180.0
    A theory of the neural bases of aesthetic experience across the arts, which draws on the tools of both cognitive neuroscience and traditional humanist inquiry.
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  46. Warren E. Steinkraus (1986). The Aesthetic Experience: An Exploration. In. In Michael H. Mitias (ed.), Possibility of the Aesthetic Experience. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic. 107--114.score: 180.0
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  47. Jerome Stolnitz (1986). The Actualities of Non-Aesthetic Experience. In. In Michael H. Mitias (ed.), Possibility of the Aesthetic Experience. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic. 27--45.score: 180.0
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  48. T. J. Diffey (1986). The Idea of Aesthetic Experience. In. In Michael H. Mitias (ed.), Possibility of the Aesthetic Experience. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic. 3--12.score: 180.0
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  49. Bohdan Dziemidok (1986). Controversy About Aesthetic Attitude: Does Aesthetic Attitude Condition Aesthetic Experience?. In. In Michael H. Mitias (ed.), Possibility of the Aesthetic Experience. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic. 139--158.score: 180.0
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