Search results for 'Aesthetic experience' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  18
    Noël Carroll (2015). Defending the Content Approach to Aesthetic Experience. Metaphilosophy 46 (2):171-188.
    This article defends the content approach to aesthetic experience. It begins by sketching this approach to aesthetic experience. It then rehearses certain recent criticisms of the view by Alan Goldman and attempts to rebut them. One of those criticisms raises a long-standing concern about the author's account that has recently been called the “qua” problem. The article concludes by putting this issue to rest.
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  2.  80
    Brian Rosebury (2000). The Historical Contingency of Aesthetic Experience. British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (1):73-88.
    The paper seeks to defend the following view. Aesthetic experience is historically contingent. Each of us is situated at a unique point in space and time, from which standpoint we continuously imagine our personal, and our collective, history. Our experience of any object of aesthetic intention is susceptible of being influenced by associations, that is by our locating the contemplated object in relation to some part or parts of this imagined history. We should not be embarrassed (...)
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  3.  10
    Roger W. H. Savage (2012). Aesthetic Experience, Mimesis and Testimony. Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies 3 (1):172-193.
    In this article, I relate the demand that Paul Ricoeur suggests mimesis places on the way we think about truth to the idea that the work of art is a model for thinking about testimony. By attributing a work’s epoché of reality to the work of imagination, I resolve the impasse that arises from attributing music, literature, and art’s distance from the real to their social emancipation. Examining the conjunction, in aesthetic experience, of the communicability and the exemplarity (...)
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  4.  13
    Marcus Düwell (1999). Aesthetic Experience, Medical Practice, and Moral Judgement. Critical Remarks on Possibilities to Understand a Complex Relationship. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):161-168.
    The aim of the paper is to examine the possible relationships between the different dimensions of aesthetics on the one hand, and medical practice and medical ethics on the other hand. Firstly, I consider whether the aesthetic perception of the human body is relevant for medical practice. Secondly, a possible analogy between the artistic process and medical action is examined. The third section concerns the comparison between medical ethical judgements and aesthetic judgement of taste. It is concluded that (...)
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  5. Corey Abel (forthcoming). Whatever It Turns Out To Be: Oakeshott on Aesthetic Experience. In Leslie MArsh Paul Franco (ed.), Whatever It Turns Out To Be: Oakeshott on Aesthetic Experience. Penn State UP
    This essay presents a multifold argument on Oakeshott's aesthetics. First, his famous essay "The Voice of Poetry" deals more explicitly and thoroughly with art than is often acknowledged. Second, aesthetic experience is a competitor to philosophic insight in so far as it discloses the coherence of a world of ideas through its uniting form and content; yet "art" remains a mode. Third, the essay points out that the absence of history from any major role in Oakeshott's most important (...)
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  6.  40
    R. N. Austgard (2006). The Aesthetic Experience of Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 7 (1):11–19.
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  7.  15
    David Sackris (2013). Category Independent Aesthetic Experience: The Case of Wine. Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (1-2):111-120.
    Kendall Walton’s “Categories of Art” seeks to situate aesthetic properties contextually. As such, certain knowledge is required to fully appreciate the aesthetic properties of a work, and without that knowledge the ‘correct’ or ‘true’ aesthetic properties of a work cannot be appreciated. The aim of this paper is to show that the way Walton conceives of his categories and art categorization is difficult to square with certain kinds of aesthetic experience—kinds of experience that seems (...)
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  8.  6
    Ha Poong Kim (2011). Beyond Words, Things, Thoughts, Feelings: Essays on Aesthetic Experience. Sussex Academic Press.
    It is a state of mind thus markedly different from our everyday experience, where thought processes impinge on our consciousness. In this book, Ha Poong Kim shares his thoughts on aesthetic experience.
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  9.  6
    Martha Barry McKenna (2015). Narrative Inquiry as an Approach for Aesthetic Experience: Life Stories in Perceiving and Responding to Works of Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (4):87-104.
    Instruction in the arts of life is something other than conveying information about them. It is a matter of communication and participation in values of life by means of imagination, and works of art are the most intimate and energetic means of aiding individuals to share in the arts of living. In teaching for aesthetic experience, I ask my students, most of whom are classroom teachers, to bring their lived experiences to each encounter with a work of art (...)
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  10.  49
    Mordechai Gordon (2012). Exploring the Relationship Between Humor and Aesthetic Experience. Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (1):111-121.
    The connection between humor and aesthetic experience has already been recognized by several thinkers and aesthetic educators. For instance, humor theorist John Morreall writes that "humor is best understood as itself a kind of aesthetic experience, equal in value at least to any other kind of aesthetic experience."1 For Morreall, both humor and aesthetic experience involve the use of the imagination, are accompanied by a sense of freedom, and often lead to (...)
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  11.  12
    Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & William Hirstein (1999). The Science of Art: A Neurological Theory of Aesthetic Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (6-7):15-41.
    We present a theory of human artistic experience and the neural mechanisms that mediate it. Any theory of art has to ideally have three components. The logic of art: whether there are universal rules or principles; The evolutionary rationale: why did these rules evolve and why do they have the form that they do; What is the brain circuitry involved? Our paper begins with a quest for artistic universals and proposes a list of ‘Eight laws of artistic experience (...)
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  12.  8
    Kimberley Curtis (1999). Our Sense of the Real: Aesthetic Experience and Arendtian Politics. Cornell University Press.
    Arendt's innovation is to recognize that this countenancing of others is an aesthetic experience that creates the political world.Curtis plumbs the relevance of ...
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  13.  5
    Tim L. Elcombe (2012). Sport, Aesthetic Experience, and Art as the Ideal Embodied Metaphor. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (2):201-217.
    Despite a prevalence of articles exploring links between sport and art in the 1970s and 1980s, philosophers in the new millennium pay relatively little explicit attention to issues related to aesthetics generally. After providing a synopsis of earlier debates over the questions ?is sport art?? and ?are aesthetics implicit to sport??, a pragmatically informed conception of aesthetic experience will be developed. Aesthetic experience, it will be argued, vitally informs sport ethics, game logic, and participant meaning. Finally, (...)
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  14. Noël Carroll (2002). Aesthetic Experience Revisited. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (2):145-168.
    In this article I divide theories of aesthetic experience into three sorts: the affectoriented approach, the axiologically oriented approach, and the content-oriented approach. I then go on to defend a version of the content-oriented approach.
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  15.  19
    Alan H. Goldman (2013). The Broad View of Aesthetic Experience. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (4):323-333.
    Peter Kivy and Noël Carroll advocate a narrow view of aesthetic experience according to which it consists mainly in attention to formal properties. Excluded are cognitive and moral properties. I defend the broader view that includes the latter properties. I argue first that cognition and moral assessment can be inseparable in experience from grasp of form and expressiveness. Second, Kivy and Carroll must extend the notion of form itself beyond ordinary usage to accommodate acknowledged aesthetic (...). Third, the broad view has a more impressive historical lineage than the narrow view. Fourth, aesthetic experience is appreciation of aesthetic value, and the latter is more plausibly analyzed in a broad way. (shrink)
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  16.  62
    Jeremy H. Smith (2006). Michel Henry's Phenomenology of Aesthetic Experience and Husserlian Intentionality. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (2):191 – 219.
    In Voir l'invisible Michel Henry applies his philosophy of autoaffection (which is both inspired by, and critical of, Husserl) to the realm of aesthetics. Henry claims that autoaffection, as non-objective experience, is essential not only to self-experience, but also to the experience of objects and their qualities. Intentionality tempts us to experience objects merely from the 'outside', but aesthetic experience returns us to the inner life of objects as a lived experience. On the (...)
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  17. Derek Matravers (2003). The Aesthetic Experience. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (2):158-174.
    This paper joins recent attempts to defend a notion of aesthetic experience. It argues that phenomenological facts and facts about aesthetic value support the Kantian notion that aesthetic experience lies between, but differs from, pleasures of the agreeable and pleasures stemming from cognitions. It then shows that accounts by Beardsley, Levinson, and Savile fail to resolve clear tensions that surface in attempting to characterize such an experience. An account of aesthetic experience—as involving (...)
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  18.  94
    Roman Ingarden (1961). Aesthetic Experience and Aesthetic Object. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21 (3):289-313.
    The purpose here is to give a thorough phenomenological account of the aesthetic experience. The difference between cognitive perception of a real object and the aesthetic experience of an esthetic object is discussed at length. Elements and phases of an esthetic experience are delineated; illustrations of a preliminary emotion of esthetic experience are given, All of which suggest a fundamental change of attitude. From normal perceiving to esthetic perceiving there is a change from categorical (...)
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  19.  4
    Marguerite La Caze (2013). The Mute Foundation of Aesthetic Experience? Culture, Theory, and Critique 54 (2):209-224.
    Luiz Cost Lima argues in The Limits of Voice that Kant’s Critique of Judgment plays a pivotal role in furthering aestheticization, or the objectification and universalization of aesthetic experience. He introduces the term criticity to refer to the act of questioning and finds that Kant poses the alternatives of aestheticization and criticity. However, Costa Lima sees Kant and most of the following literary criticism as accepting aestheticization, with exceptions such as Schlegel and Kafka. (xii) He states ‘The effective (...)
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  20.  30
    Bart Vandenabeele (2007). Schopenhauer on the Values of Aesthetic Experience. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):565-582.
    In this essay, I argue that Schopenhauer’s view of the aesthetic feelings of the beautiful and the sublime shows how a “dialectical” interpretation that homogenizes both aesthetic concepts and reduces thediscrepancy between both to merely quantitative differences is flawed. My critical analysis reveals a number of important tensions in both Schopenhauer’s own aesthetic theory—which does not ultimately succeed in “merging” Plato’s and Kant’s approaches—and the interpretation that unjustly reduces the value of aesthetic experience to a (...)
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  21.  55
    Richard Glauser (2002). Aesthetic Experience in Shaftesbury: Richard Glauser. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):25–54.
    [Richard Glauser] Shaftesbury's theory of aesthetic experience is based on his conception of a natural disposition to apprehend beauty, a real 'form' of things. I examine the implications of the disposition's naturalness. I argue that the disposition is not an extra faculty or a sixth sense, and attempt to situate Shaftesbury's position on this issue between those of Locke and Hutcheson. I argue that the natural disposition is to be perfected in many different ways in order to (...)
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  22.  7
    Ingar Brinck (2007). Situated Cognition, Dynamic Systems, and Art: On Artistic Creativity and Aesthetic Experience. Janus Head 9 (2):407-431.
    It is argued that the theory of situated cognition together with dynamic systems theory can explain the core of artistic practice and aesthetic experience, and furthermore paves the way for an account of how artist and audience can meet via the artist’s work. The production and consumption of art is an embodied practice, firmly based in perception and action, and supported by features of the local, agent-centered and global, socio-cultural contexts. Artistic creativity and aesthetic experience equally (...)
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  23.  25
    Haewan Lee (2008). Characterizing Aesthetic Experience. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 1:161-167.
    In this paper, I suggest what I think is an appropriate characterization of aesthetic experience. I do this by critically assessing Noel Carroll’s position and Gary Iseminger’s counterposition. Carroll claims that aesthetic experience should be understood only as an experience of the aesthetic content of an object. Although I accept many of Carroll’s points, I find his position unconvincing. I contend that, in addition to the content, positive value plays a significant role as a (...)
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  24.  38
    Alison Ross (2010). The Modern Concept of Aesthetic Experience: From Ascetic Pleasure to Social Criticism. Critical Horizons 11 (3):333-339.
    This paper examines the use of “pleasure” as the distinguishing mark of aesthetic experience in post-Kantian philosophy. It shows how the distinctive features of aesthetic experience, such as pleasure, qualify this experience as a platform for social criticism. The key argument is that the autonomy of the aesthetic experience is not “false”, rather it is paradoxical in the strong sense that the fact of its communicative efficacy, which follows from distinctive, “autonomous” aesthetic (...)
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  25.  2
    Rika Dunlap (2015). From Freedom to Equality: Rancière and the Aesthetic Experience of Equality. Continental Philosophy Review 48 (3):341-358.
    This article examines Rancière’s political reading of aesthetics through a historical analysis into the two aesthetic theories of freedom at work in Rancière’s philosophy; Kant’s freedom as self-governance and Schiller’s freedom as harmony. While aesthetic experience is considered morally conducive through its association with freedom, this article argues that Rancière translates such discussions of freedom into that of equality by extracting the political dimensions of aesthetic experience. Given that art has the unique ability to empower (...)
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  26.  3
    John McAteer (2015). Silencing Theodicy with Enthusiasm: Aesthetic Experience as a Response to the Problem of Evil in Shaftesbury, Annie Dillard, and the Book of Job. Heythrop Journal 57 (2).
    The problem of evil is not only a logical problem about God's goodness but also an existential problem about the sense of God's presence, which the Biblical book of Job conceives as a problem of aesthetic experience. Thus, just as theism can be grounded in religious experience, atheism can be grounded in experience of evil. This phenomenon is illustrated by two contrasting literary descriptions of aesthetic experience by Jean-Paul Sartre and Annie Dillard. I illuminate (...)
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  27.  11
    Jonathan Owen Clark (2013). Aesthetic Experience, Subjective Historical Experience and the Problem of Constructivism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (1):57-81.
    This article takes as its starting point the recent work of Frank Ankersmit on subjective historical experience. Such an experience, which Ankersmit describes as a ‘sudden obliteration of the rift between present and past’ is connected strongly with the Deweyan theory of art as experiential, which contains an account of aesthetic experience as affording a similar breakdown in the polarization of the subject and object of experience. The article shows how other ideas deriving from the (...)
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  28.  43
    Paul Guyer (2003). The Cognitive Element in Aesthetic Experience: Reply to Matravers. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):412-418.
    ...as a Kantian model of aesthetic experience a free play of the cognitive faculties with beliefs or propositions. This is false to Kant, whose conception is better interpreted as a free play with elements of cognition such as intuitions and concepts. More importantly, an account closer to Kant's original provides a less restrictive model of aesthetic experience than Matravers's interpretation does, and therefore one that more readily fits a much larger number of cases.
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  29.  30
    Rob van Gerwen (1995). Kant's Regulative Principle of Aesthetic Excellence: The Ideal Aesthetic Experience. Kant-Studien 86 (3):331-345.
    It is rather intriguing that we will often try to persuade people of what we find beautiful, even though we do not believe that they may subsequently base their judgement of taste on our testimony. Typically, we think that the experience of beauty is such that we cannot leave it to others to be had. Moreover, we are often aware of the contingency of our own judgements’ foundation in our own experience. Nevertheless, we do think that certain (...), evaluative conceptions do relate to specific experiences in a non-trivial way, especially that of aesthetic excellence. Now certain analytical aestheticians ascribe truth values to aesthetic judgements of various kinds. Such ascription would evidently have a bearing on the problem of aesthetic experience’s relevance for evaluation, as we may in the end be better off neglecting the experiential altogether in virtue of treating aesthetic values in objectivist ways, as natural properties, or as reducible to such properties, descriptions of which will then indeed be true or false.1 However, I think that it is too early yet to bury subjectivism. So let us instead defend it and try to get a better grasp on its suppositions. In this we may profit from ideas advanced by David Wiggins, who neither denies the role played by objective properties, nor neglects the subjective import. According to him, aesthetic values are somehow kinds of relations, which are established by an elaborate process of criticism and refinement of perceptions of, and feelings toward specific natural properties.2 The argument in this paper suggests that the analysis of a paradigmatic pair regarding ‘aesthetic excellence’ provides us with inter-. (shrink)
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  30.  13
    Dan Eugen Ratiu (2013). Remapping the Realm of Aesthetics: On Recent Controversies About the Aesthetic and Aesthetic Experience in Everyday Life. Estetika 50 (1):3-26.
    This article addresses two controversial open questions in philosophical aesthetics: the nature and value of the aesthetic and of aesthetic experience when approached from the standpoint of ‘aesthetics of everyday life’ (AEL). Contrasting ‘strong’ AEL accounts that consider them radically different from those in the sphere of art, I claim that extending the realm and scope of aesthetics towards everyday life does not necessarily dispense with the concepts of the aesthetic and aesthetic experience as (...)
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  31.  22
    James Phillips (2010). Restoring Place to Aesthetic Experience: Heidegger's Critique of Rilke. Critical Horizons 11 (3):341-358.
    Atypical among Heidegger’s numerous discussions of poets is the condemnation of Rilke in the 1942-43 lecture course Parmenides. At stake is the definition of “the open” (das Offene): Rilke reserves the open for animals as freedom from conceptual determinacy, whereas Heidegger reserves it for human beings as the place of Being in which things first appear as what they are. The open, for Heidegger, names the existential conception of place (as distinct from a geographical point) and features in his life-long (...)
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  32.  4
    Michael R. Spicher (2013). The Distinct Basic Good of Aesthetic Experience and Its Political Import. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):711 - 729.
    To protect art under the First Amendment, John Finnis claims that art is simply the expression of emotion. Later, to protect aesthetic experience from subjectivity, Finnis claims that aesthetic experience is just a form of knowledge. However, neither of these claims adequately accounts for the nature of their objects nor fully protects them. The expression of emotion—intrinsic to art in Finnis’s view—is not always clear or even present, yet people can still appreciate the work. Equally problematic, (...)
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  33.  6
    Piotr Schollenberger (2013). Aesthetic Experience and the Ideal Work of Art. Dialogue and Universalism 20 (3/4):59-69.
    This essay discusses certain problems raised by Edmund Husserl’s conception of meaning with regard to the analysis of aesthetic experience. By referring to Jacques Derrida’s critique of phenomenological idealism I show that the metaphor of “stratification”, adopted by Husserl in his “Ideas” to a problem of discursive expression, if applied to the analysis of a work of art i.e. painting, allows to avoid the objection of “metaphysics of presence” commonly raised towards the phenomenological method.To present the major issue (...)
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  34.  16
    Joseph Thomas Tolliver (2012). Tales of the Ineffable: Crafting Concepts in Aesthetic Experience. Philosophical Studies 161 (1):153-162.
    Lehrer has argued that in having an aesthetic experience of an art work we come to have ineffable knowledge of what the art object is like. This knowledge is made possible by our ability to conceptualize the art object by means of a process Lehrer calls, "exemplarization", that involves using an experience to craft a general representation of that very experience. I suggest that exemplar concepts function as vehicles of ineffable representation only if they have two (...)
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  35.  24
    Paisley Livingston (2004). C. I. Lewis and the Outlines of Aesthetic Experience. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (4):378-392.
    The current essay describes aspects of C. I. Lewis’s rarely cited contributions to aesthetics, focusing primarily on the conception of aesthetic experience developed in An Analysis of Knowledge and Valuation. Lewis characterized aesthetic value as a proper subset of inherent value, which he understood as the power to occasion intrinsically valued experiences. He distinguished aesthetic experiences from experiences more generally in terms of eight conditions. Roughly, he proposed that aesthetic experiences have a highly positive, preponderantly (...)
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  36.  20
    Anthony Savile (2002). Aesthetic Experience in Shaftesbury: Anthony Savile. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):55–74.
    [Richard Glauser] Shaftesbury's theory of aesthetic experience is based on his conception of a natural disposition to apprehend beauty, a real 'form' of things. I examine the implications of the disposition's naturalness. I argue that the disposition is not an extra faculty or a sixth sense, and attempt to situate Shaftesbury's position on this issue between those of Locke and Hutcheson. I argue that the natural disposition is to be perfected in many different ways in order to be (...)
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  37.  4
    Peter M. Hopsicker PhD (2014). The Importance of Imagination in Aesthetic Experience: Polanyian Thoughts on Elcombe. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (2):209-218.
    In his recent work, ‘Sport, Aesthetic Experience, and Art as the Ideal Embodied Metaphor’, Tim L. Elcombe explores links between sport and art from a pragmatically informed conception of aesthetic experience. However, Elcombe's work does not highlight the role of the imagination in the interpretation of the aesthetic something Michael Polanyi claims to be the ‘cornerstone of aesthetic theory’. With the backdrop of an increased interest in the aesthetics, phenomenology, and epistemology of sport, this (...)
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  38.  13
    Zofia Rosińska (2011). Leopold Blaustein: Imaginary Representations, A Study on the Border of Psychology and Aesthetics; The Role of Perception in Aesthetic Experience. Estetika 48 (2):199-243.
    The introduction to Leopold Blaustein’s (1905–1944) two essays in this issue of Estetika contains a general biographical note about the author and his philosophical affiliations, as well as a brief description of his particular interests within philosophical aesthetics. Blaustein’s method of philosophical inquiry is described as analytical phenomenology. Three interconnected fields of aesthetics in Blaustein’s works are emphasized: the theory of aesthetic perception, the theory of attitudes (towards the imaginary world and the reproduced one) and the theory of representation, (...)
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  39.  4
    Sarah Mattice (2013). Artistry as Methodology: Aesthetic Experience and Chinese Philosophy1. Philosophy Compass 8 (3):199-209.
    Although aesthetics has been to some extent marginalized in western philosophy, within the Chinese philosophical tradition aesthetics plays a key role. This article explores Chinese aesthetics as a site of valuable resources for rethinking the ways in which we conceptualize philosophical activity. After introducing a few distinct features of the Chinese aesthetic tradition, the article examines aesthetic distance in terms of guan, he, and ying, Chinese conceptions of artists and participants, and aesthetic suggestiveness or the inexhaustibility of (...)
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  40.  1
    Kitt Austgard (2006). The Aesthetic Experience of Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 7 (1):11-19.
    This article highlights the distinction between the ‘art of nursing’ and ‘fine art’. While something in the nature of nursing can be described as ‘the art of nursing’, it is not to be misunderstood as ‘fine art’ or craft. Therefore, the term ‘aesthetic’ in relation to nursing should not be linked to the aesthetic of modern art, but instead to a broader and more general meaning of the word. The paper's main focus is the aesthetic experience, (...)
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  41.  16
    Wendy Lynne Lee (2006). On Ecology and Aesthetic Experience: A Feminist Theory of Value and Praxis. Ethics and the Environment 11 (1):21-41.
    : My aim is to develop a feminist theory of value—an axiology—which unites two notions that seem to have little in common for a theorizing whose ultimate goal is justice-driven emancipatory action, namely, the ecological and the aesthetic. In this union lies the potential for a critical feminist political praxis capable of appreciating not only the value of human life, but those relationships upon which human and nonhuman life depend. A vital component of this praxis is, I argue, the (...)
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  42.  5
    Ian Woodward & David Ellison (2010). Aesthetic Experience, Transitional Objects and the Third Space: The Fusion of Audience and Aesthetic Objects in the Performing Arts. Thesis Eleven 103 (1):45-53.
    Aesthetic experience has been relativized and marginalized by recent social and cultural theory. As less attention has been paid to understanding the nature of aesthetic experience than mapping the distributed social correlates of tastes, its transformative potential and capacity to animate actors’ imaginations and actions goes unexplored. In this paper we draw upon a large number of in-depth interviews with performing arts audiences around Australia to investigate the language and discourse used to describe aesthetic experiences. (...)
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  43.  2
    Ronaldo Bispo (2004). Flash Aesthesis: A Neurophilosophy of Aesthetic Experience. Trans/Form/Ação 27 (2):113-142.
    Following text places in dialogue or applies to a certain conception of aesthetic experience a vast set of experimental evidences extracted from the inquiry of other mental phenomena, in particular the subjective experience of emotions and feelings. Comimg from António Damásio the beam master, the skeleton, the base, the structure of all my argument. My main hypothesis is that certain objects and situations activate cerebral dispositional hyper-spaces associated to the ocurrence of phenomena like sensation of beauty, pleasure (...)
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  44.  3
    Bernardo Barros Coelho de Oliveira (2011). Judgment in Contemporary Aesthetic Experience. Filosofia Unisinos 12 (1):38-47.
    The article presents central concepts of the “Critique of Aesthetic Judgment,” the first part of the Critique of Judgment by Kant, arguing for the possibility of a fruitful discussion between this work and the problems of aesthetic experience in the contemporary world. It emphasizes Kant’s claims about the judgments of taste concerning works of art and tries to remove some prejudices that hinder the dialogue between this work and current problems.
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  45.  3
    Eva Kit Wah Man (2007). Rethinking Art and Values: A Comparative Revelation of the Origin of Aesthetic Experience (From the Neo-Confucian Perspectives). Filozofski Vestnik 2.
    In his article, "The End of Aesthetic Experience" (1997) Richard Shusterman studies the contemporary fate of aesthetic experience, which has long been regarded as one of the core concepts of Western aesthetics till the last half century. It has then expanded into an umbrella concept for aesthetic notions such as the sublime and the picturesque. I agree with Shusterman that aesthetic experience has become the island of freedom, beauty, and idealistic meaning in an (...)
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  46.  7
    Bart Vandenabeele (2007). Schopenhauer on the Values of Aesthetic Experience. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):565-582.
    In this essay, I argue that Schopenhauer’s view of the aesthetic feelings of the beautiful and the sublime shows how a “dialectical” interpretation that homogenizes both aesthetic concepts and reduces thediscrepancy between both to merely quantitative differences is flawed. My critical analysis reveals a number of important tensions in both Schopenhauer’s own aesthetic theory—which does not ultimately succeed in “merging” Plato’s and Kant’s approaches—and the interpretation that unjustly reduces the value of aesthetic experience to a (...)
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  47.  6
    Martin Eshleman (1966). Aesthetic Experience, The Aesthetic Object and Criticism. The Monist 50 (2):281-298.
    The aesthetic experience, In husserl's language, Brackets or suspends the natural standpoint. Consciousness perceives the work of art not as an object of the factual world, But as a man-Made artifact to be enjoyed just for certain immediately experienced qualities. The work of art is neither a real physical entity nor a real psychical entity, But a purely intentional object, For which the physical object serves as a substratum. The critic must recreate the purely intentional object by completing (...)
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  48.  2
    Jerome Stolnitz (1986). The Actualities of Non-Aesthetic Experience. In Michael H. Mitias (ed.), Possibility of the Aesthetic Experience. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic 27--45.
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  49.  2
    Leonel Ribeiro dos Santos (2006). From Aesthetic Experience and Teleological Appreciation of Nature to the Ecological Consciousness: Reading Kant's Critique of Judgment. Trans/Form/Ação 29 (1):7-29.
    The aim of this paper is to suggest how the kantian conception of aesthetic experience of nature can illuminate some demands posed by the actual ecological consciousness. Main topics of our exposition would be the reversible analogy Kant supposes between art and nature, the kantian concept of a "technic of nature", the recognised priority of aesthetic experience of natural beauty within kantian Aesthetics and the function that she plays in the whole architectonics of the Critique of (...)
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  50.  1
    Warren E. Steinkraus (1986). The Aesthetic Experience: An Exploration. In Michael H. Mitias (ed.), Possibility of the Aesthetic Experience. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic 107--114.
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