Search results for 'Aesthetics, Medieval' (try it on Scholar)

77 found
Sort by:
  1. C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.) (2010). Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 132.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Elizabeth A. Newby (1987). A Portrait of the Artist: The Legends of Orpheus and Their Use in Medieval and Renaissance Aesthetics. Garland.score: 132.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Umberto Eco (1988). The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas. Harvard University Press.score: 84.0
    As the only book-length treatment of Aquinas's aesthetics available in English, this volume should interest philosophers, medievalists, historians, critics, and ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. C. Barrett (2005). Medieval Aesthetics. In Władysław Tatarkiewicz (ed.), History of Aesthetics. New York,Continuum.score: 78.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Joseph Margolis (2001). Medieval Aesthetics. In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.score: 78.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Lawrence D. Roberts (ed.) (1982). Approaches to Nature in the Middle Ages: Papers of the Tenth Annual Conference of the Center for Medieval & Early Renaissance Studies. Center for Medieval & Early Renaissance Studies.score: 78.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Anne E. Monius (2004). Love, Violence, and the Aesthetics of Disgust: Śaivas and Jains in Medieval South India. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 32 (2/3):113-172.score: 72.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Willene B. Clark (1999). Debra Hassig, Medieval Bestiaries: Text, Image, Ideology.(RES Monographs on Anthropology and Aesthetics.) Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1995. Pp. Xx, 300 Plus 176 Black-and-White Figures. $90. [REVIEW] Speculum 74 (2):424-426.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Umberto Eco (1986). Art and Beauty in the Middle Ages. Yale University Press.score: 72.0
    In this book, the Italian novelist and philosopher Umberto Eco presents a learned summary of medieval aesthetic ideas.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Antanas Andrija Uskas (2005). Traditional Japanese Medieval Aesthetics: Comparative Studies. In Jurate Baranova (ed.), Contemporary Philosophical Discourse in Lithuania. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy. 163.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Stephen Halliwell (2012). Aesthetics (O.V.) Bychkov Aesthetic Revelation. Reading Ancient and Medieval Texts After Hans Urs von Balthasar. Pp. Xviii + 349. Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 2010. Cased, US$79.95. ISBN: 978-0-8132-1731-4. (O.V.) Bychkov, (A.) Sheppard (Edd., Trans.) Greek and Roman Aesthetics. Pp. Xlii + 249. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Paper, £17.99, US$30.99 (Cased, £55, US$95). ISBN: 978-0-521-54792-5 (978-0-521-83928-0 Hbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 62 (2):428-431.score: 72.0
  12. W. Beierwaltes (1976). Negati-Affirmatio-World as Metaphor-Foundation of Medieval Latin Aesthetics by Johannes-Scotus-Eriguena. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 83 (2):237-265.score: 72.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Kalman P. Bland (1993). Medieval Jewish Aesthetics: Maimonides, Body, and Scripture in Profiat Duran. Journal of the History of Ideas 54 (4):533-559.score: 72.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Edgar de Bruyne (1969). The Esthetics of the Middle Ages. New York, F. Ungar Pub. Co..score: 72.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Jana K. Schulman (2008). Elizabeth M. Tyler, Old English Poetics: The Aesthetics of the Familiar in Anglo-Saxon England. York: York Medieval Press, in Association with Boydell and Brewer and the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York, 2006. Pp. Xvi, 194. $85. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (1):247-248.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Thomas Gilby (1934/1977). Poetic Experience: An Introduction to Thomist Aesthetic. Folcroft Library Editions.score: 66.0
  17. Ákos Cseke (2011). A Középkor És Az Esztétika. Akadémiai Kiadó.score: 60.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. José Acácio Aguiar de Castro (2006). O Sentido Do Belo No Século Xii: E Outros Estudos. Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda.score: 60.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Maria-Christine Leitgeb (2010). Concordia Mundi: Platons Symposion Und Marsilio Ficinos Philosophie der Liebe. Holzhausen.score: 60.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Alessandro Giovannelli (ed.) (2012). Aesthetics: The Key Thinkers. Continuum.score: 54.0
    Offers a comprehensive historical overview of the field of aesthetics. Eighteen specially commissioned essays introduce and explore the contributions of those philosophers who have shaped the subject, from its origins in the work of the ancient Greeks to contemporary developments in the 21st Century. -/- The book reconstructs the history of aesthetics, clearly illustrating the most important attempts to address such crucial issues as the nature of aesthetic judgment, the status of art, and the place of the arts within society. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Dana LaCourse Munteanu (2012). Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy. Cambridge University Press.score: 50.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Views about Pity and Fear as Aesthetic Emotions: 1. Drama and the emotions: an Indo-European connection? 2. Gorgias: a strange trio, the poetic emotions; 3. Plato: from reality to tragedy and back; 4. Aristotle: the first 'theorist' of the aesthetic emotions; Part II. Pity and Fear within Tragedies: 5. An introduction; 6. Aeschylus: Persians; 7. Prometheus Bound; 8. Sophocles: Ajax; 9. Euripides: Orestes; Appendix: catharsis and the emotions in the definition of tragedy (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Bueno Domínguez & María Luisa (2010). Belleza y Crueldad En la Edad Media. Dilex.score: 48.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Andreas Speer (2000). Beyond Art and Beauty: In Search of the Object of Philosophical Aesthetics. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 8 (1):73 – 88.score: 42.0
    This article deals with the ambigous situation of philosophical aesthetics, which now seems to have lost its proper object. Moreover, Arthur C. Danto has popularized talk of an end of art, in which he ties that end to the end of any aesthetic master narrative. Comparing modern and medieval approaches to art, this paper tries to reformulate the question of philosophical aesthetics, which has to be understood in a hermeneutical way. Taken in a heuristic manner 'art' and 'beauty' remain (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Jack Dudley (2013). Transcendence and the End of Modernist Aesthetics. Renascence 65 (2):103-124.score: 42.0
    Taking into account Jones’s adoption of principles of modernist poetics—juxtaposition, allusion, and parataxis, all geared “to create newness”—this essay examines the theological ramifications for the poet’s breaking down, in his semi-autobiographical World War I poem, of modernist order and control. Jones unravels modernist aesthetics, conveying their inadequacy to the brutal realities of war. A space for religious belief appears through this process, but one not of heightened understanding; instead it is a via negativa, an unknowing, consonant with ideas from (...) mysticism but applied to the modern Waste Land. This pattern is borne out in Jones’s handling of the medieval trope of “misadventure,” his references to Eliot, his play on the word “line,” and his development of the concept of “parenthesis.”. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Paul Binski (2010). Reflections on the "Wonderful Height and Size" of Gothic Great Churches and the Medieval Sublime. In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Adam S. Cohen (2010). Magnificence in Miniature : The Case of Early Medieval Manuscripts. In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Emma Dilon (2010). Listening to Magnificence in Medieval Paris. In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. G. W. F. Hegel (1998). Aesthetics: Volume 2. Clarendon Press.score: 42.0
    In his Aesthetics Hegel gives full expression to his seminal theory of art. He surveys the history of art from ancient India, Egypt, and Greece through to the Romantic movement of his own time, criticizes major works, and probes their meaning and significance; his rich array of examples gives broad scope for his judgement and makes vivid his exposition of his theory. -/- The substantial Introduction is Hegel's best exposition of his general philosophy of art, and provides the ideal way (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. G. W. F. Hegel (1998). Aesthetics: Volume 1. Clarendon Press.score: 42.0
    In his Aesthetics Hegel gives full expression to his seminal theory of art. He surveys the history of art from ancient India, Egypt, and Greece through to the Romantic movement of his own time, criticizes major works, and probes their meaning and significance; his rich array of examples gives broad scope for his judgement and makes vivid his exposition of his theory. -/- The substantial Introduction is Hegel's best exposition of his general philosophy of art, and provides the ideal way (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. C. Stephen Jaeger (2010). Richard of St. Victor and the Medieval Sublime. In , Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Areli Marina (2010). Magnificent Architecture in Late Medieval Italy. In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Martino Rossi Monti (2010). Opus Es Magnificum" : The Image of God and the Aesthetics of Grace. In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Beth Williamson (2010). How Magnificent Was Medieval Art? In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Cynthia Freeland (2001). But is It Art?: An Introduction to Art Theory. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    From Andy Warhol's Brillo boxes to provocative dung-splattered madonnas, in today's art world many strange, even shocking, things are put on display. This often leads exasperated viewers to exclaim--is this really art? In this invaluable primer on aesthetics, Freeland explains why innovation and controversy are so highly valued in art, weaving together philosophy and art theory with many engrossing examples. Writing clearly and perceptively, she explores the cultural meanings of art in different contexts, and highlights the continuities of tradition that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Harald Kleinschmidt (2005). Perception and Action in Medieval Europe. Boydell Press.score: 36.0
    Perception and action : the genesis of their separation as concepts -- The transformation of perception in the early eleventh century : dance historical records from the village of Kölbigk in East Saxony -- Impacts from the environment : the perception of odour, touch and taste -- Impacts on the environment : the rationality of action -- Aesthetics and ethics : their separation as concepts.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. David Summers (1987). The Judgment of Sense: Renaissance Naturalism and the Rise of Aesthestics. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    'ith the rise of naturalism in the art of the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance there developed an extensive and diverse literature about art which helped to explain, justify, and shape its new aims. In this book, David Summers provides an original investigation of the philosophical and psychological notions invoked in this new theory and criticism. From a thorough examination of the sources, he shows how the medieval language of mental discourse derived from an understanding of classical thought. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Umberto Eco (ed.) (2007/2011). On Ugliness. Rizzoli.score: 36.0
    In the mold of his acclaimed History of Beauty , renowned cultural critic Umberto Eco’s On Ugliness is an exploration of the monstrous and the repellant in visual culture and the arts. What is the voyeuristic impulse behind our attraction to the gruesome and the horrible? Where does the magnetic appeal of the sordid and the scandalous come from? Is ugliness also in the eye of the beholder? Eco’s encyclopedic knowledge and captivating storytelling skills combine in this ingenious study of (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Bruce W. Holsinger (2001). Music, Body, and Desire in Medieval Culture: Hildegard of Bingen to Chaucer. Stanford University Press.score: 36.0
    Ranging chronologically from the twelfth to the fifteenth century and thematically from Latin to vernacular literary modes, this book challenges standard assumptions about the musical cultures and philosophies of the European Middle Ages. Engaging a wide range of premodern texts and contexts, from the musicality of sodomy in twelfth-century polyphony to Chaucer's representation of pedagogical violence in the Prioress's Tale, from early Christian writings on the music of the body to the plainchant and poetry of Hildegard of Bingen, the author (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Daud Ali (2011). Padmaśrī's Nāgarasarvasva and the World of Medieval Kāmaśāstra. Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (1):41-62.score: 32.0
    This essay focuses on a neglected and important text, the Nāgarasarvasva of Padmaśrī, as an index to the changing contours of kāmaśāstra in the early second millennium (1000-1500) CE. Focusing on a number of themes which linked Padmaśrī’s work with contemporary treatises, the essay argues that kāmaśāstra incorporated several new conceptions of the body and related para-technologies as well as elements of material and aesthetic culture which had become prominent in the cosmopolitan, courtly milieu. Rather than seeing this development as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Fadlou Shehadi (1995). Philosophies of Music in Medieval Islam. E.J. Brill.score: 30.0
    This surveys the philosophies of music of the most important thinkers in Islam between the 9th and the 15th centuries A.D. It covers topics ranging from the ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. R. D. Sweeney (2010). Arts, Language and Hermeneutical Aesthetics: Interview with Paul Ricoeur (1913-2005). Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (8):935-951.score: 30.0
    Responding to the interlocutors, Ricoeur, utilizing Kantian aesthetic theory, addresses the nature of the work of art, its universality and communicability, and explores its temporality — its ‘transhistoricity’ — by utilizing concepts derived from medieval philosophy, including ‘sempiternality’ and ‘monstration’. He expands on hermeneutics, defends it against charges of relativism, expatiates on the danger of aestheticism, and explains the value of mimesis in art. He explores the different art forms, focusing with Merleau-Ponty on Cézanne as a model of the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Ricardo Luiz Silveira da Costa (2012). The Aesthetics of the Body in the Philosophy and Art of the Middle Ages: Text and Image. Trans/Form/Ação 35 (SPE):161-178.score: 30.0
    A ideia de beleza - e sua consequente fruição estética - variou conforme as transformações das sociedades humanas, no tempo. Durante a Idade Média, coexistiram diversas concepções de qual era o papel do corpo na hierarquia dos valores estéticos, tanto na Filosofia quanto na Arte. Nossa proposta é apresentar a estética do corpo medieval que alguns filósofos desenvolveram em seus tratados (particularmente Isidoro de Sevilha, Hildegarda de Bingen, João de Salisbury, Bernardo de Claraval e Tomás de Aquino), além de (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. S. D. Chrostowska (2013). Collision: A Collision of Gargoyles. Evental Aesthetics 2 (1):10-20.score: 30.0
    This article addresses the aesthetic status of gargoyles in medieval Gothic architecture. Irreducible to the grotesque yet manifestly discrepant with the core of cathedral and monastic buildings, the gargoyle serves as an entry point for an exploration of the stylistic relations comprising the Gothic and reflecting the cultural duality of the ecclesiastic sites of its historical emergence. The relation between gargoyles and the bulk of Gothic structures and ornamentation is discussed in terms of an “aesthetics of contrast.”.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Irmgard Scherer (2007). Irrationalism in Eighteenth Century Aesthetics. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 12:23-29.score: 30.0
    This essay deals with a particularly recalcitrant problem in the history of ideas, that of irrationalism. It emerged to full consciousness in mid-eighteenth century thought. Irrationalism was a logical consequence of individualism which in turn was a direct outcome of the Cartesian self-reflective subject. In time these tendencies produced the "critical" Zeitgeist and the "epoch of taste" during which Kant began thinking about such matters. Like Alfred Bäumler, I argue that irrationalism could not have arisen in ancient or medieval (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Philip Tallon (2011). The Poetics of Evil: Toward an Aesthetic Theodicy. OUP USA.score: 30.0
    What role does art play in unravelling the theological problem of evil? What can aesthetics show us about God's goodness in a world of iniquity? Philip Tallon constructs an aesthetic theodicy through a fascinating examination of Christian aesthetics, ranging from the writings of Augustine to contemporary philosophy. Tallon offers a new framework for theodicy that allows the substantial inclusion of aesthetics, building on the work of Eleonore Stump. He then examines the concept of cosmic harmony, the predominant aesthetic motif within (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Cyril Barret (1965). Medieval Art Criticism. British Journal of Aesthetics 5 (1):25-36.score: 24.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Julius Portnoy (1949). Similarities of Musical Concepts in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 7 (3):235-243.score: 24.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Michele Marra (1995). Japanese Aesthetics: The Construction of Meaning. Philosophy East and West 45 (3):367-386.score: 24.0
    Two major hermeneutical practices in the history of interpretation in premodern Japan are located. The first--a deconstructive practice followed by medieval thinkers (Dōgen) and poets (Fujiwara Shunzei and Fujiwara Teika)--interprets reality by deferring and dispersing it in its representations. The analogies of this methodology are highlighted with what the Italian philosopher Gianni Vattimo has called "pensiero debole" (weak thought). The latter recuperates the centrality of the concept of presence whose disclosure becomes the major task of the interpreter. Examples of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Eileen A. Joy (2013). Disturbing the Wednesday-Ish Business-as-Usual of the University Studium: A Wayzgoose Manifest. Continent 2 (4):260-268.score: 24.0
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Daud Ali (2011). Rethinking the History of the Kāma World in Early India. Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (1):1-13.score: 24.0
    This essay introduces a special issue on the history of kāmaśāstra in medieval India. It briefly reviews the secondary scholarship on the subject from the publication of the first translations of the genre at the end of the nineteenth century. It highlights the relatively unexplored history of later kāmaśāstra, and stresses the need for contexualized and detailed studies of the many kāmaśāstra treatises produced in the second millennium CE. The introduction, and the essays that follow, also argue for an (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 77