Search results for 'Aesthetics, Resistance, Imagination, Fictionality, Dissertation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Derek Matravers (2003). Fictional Assent and the (so-Called) `Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance'. In Matthew Kieran & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge 91-106.
    This article criticises existing solutions to the 'puzzle of imaginative resistance', reconstrues it, and offers a solution of its own. About the Book : Imagination, Philosophy and the Arts is the first comprehensive collection of papers by philosophers examining the nature of imagination and its role in understanding and making art. Imagination is a central concept in aesthetics with close ties to issues in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language, yet it has not received the kind of (...)
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  2. Kendall Lewis Walton (2006). On the (so-Called) Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance. In Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination. Oxford University Press 137-148.
  3. Brian Weatherson (2004). Morality, Fiction, and Possibility. Philosophers' Imprint 4 (3):1-27.
    Authors have a lot of leeway with regard to what they can make true in their story. In general, if the author says that p is true in the fiction we’re reading, we believe that p is true in that fiction. And if we’re playing along with the fictional game, we imagine that, along with everything else in the story, p is true. But there are exceptions to these general principles. Many authors, most notably Kendall Walton and Tamar Szabó Gendler, (...)
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  4. Kendall Lewis Walton (1994/2015). Morals in Fiction and Fictional Morality (I). Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 68:27-50.
  5. Shen-yi Liao, Nina Strohminger & Chandra Sekhar Sripada (2014). Empirically Investigating Imaginative Resistance. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (3):339-355.
    Imaginative resistance refers to a phenomenon in which people resist engaging in particular prompted imaginative activities. Philosophers have primarily theorized about this phenomenon from the armchair. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of empirical methods for investigating imaginative resistance. We present two studies that help to establish the psychological reality of imaginative resistance, and to uncover one factor that is significant for explaining this phenomenon but low in psychological salience: genre. Furthermore, our studies have the methodological upshot of showing (...)
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  6. Tamar Szabó Gendler (2000). The Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance. Journal of Philosophy 97 (2):55-81.
  7. Tamar Szabo Gendler (2006). Imaginative Resistance Revisited. In Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination. Oxford University Press 149-173.
  8. Jonathan M. Weinberg & Aaron Meskin (2006). Puzzling Over the Imagination: Philosophical Problems, Architectural Solutions. In Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination: New Essays on Pretence, Possibility, and Fiction. Oxford 175-202.
     
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  9. Richard Moran (1994). The Expression of Feeling in Imagination. Philosophical Review 103 (1):75-106.
  10.  88
    Amy Mullin (2004). Moral Defects, Aesthetic Defects, and the Imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (3):249–261.
  11. Kathleen Stock (2003). The Tower of Goldbach and Other Impossible Tales. In Matthew Kieran & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge 107-124.
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  12.  17
    Amy Kind (ed.) (2016). The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination. Routledge.
    Imagination occupies a central place in philosophy, going back to Aristotle. However, following a period of relative neglect there has been an explosion of interest in imagination in the past two decades as philosophers examine the role of imagination in debates about the mind and cognition, aesthetics and ethics, as well as epistemology, science and mathematics. This outstanding _Handbook_ contains over thirty specially commissioned chapters by leading philosophers organised into six clear sections examining the most important aspects of the philosophy (...)
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  13.  95
    Shen-yi Liao (2016). Imaginative Resistance, Narrative Engagement, Genre. Res Philosophica 93 (2):461-482.
    Imaginative resistance refers to a phenomenon in which people resist engaging in particular prompted imaginative activities. On one influential diagnosis of imaginative resistance, the systematic difficulties are due to these particular propositions’ discordance with real-world norms. This essay argues that this influential diagnosis is too simple. While imagination is indeed by default constrained by real-world norms during narrative engagement, it can be freed with the power of genre conventions and expectations.
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  14. Cain Samuel Todd (2009). Imaginability, Morality, and Fictional Truth: Dissolving the Puzzle of 'Imaginative Resistance'. Philosophical Studies 143 (2):187-211.
    This paper argues that there is no genuine puzzle of ‘imaginative resistance’. In part 1 of the paper I argue that the imaginability of fictional propositions is relative to a range of different factors including the ‘thickness’ of certain concepts, and certain pre-theoretical and theoretical commitments. I suggest that those holding realist moral commitments may be more susceptible to resistance and inability than those holding non-realist commitments, and that it is such realist commitments that ultimately motivate the problem. However, I (...)
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  15. Tamar Szabó Gendler & Shen-yi Liao (2016). The Problem of Imaginative Resistance. In John Gibson & Noël Carroll (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. Routledge 405-418.
    The problem of imaginative resistance holds interest for aestheticians, literary theorists, ethicists, philosophers of mind, and epistemologists. We present a somewhat opinionated overview of the philosophical discussion to date. We begin by introducing the phenomenon of imaginative resistance. We then review existing responses to the problem, giving special attention to recent research directions. Finally, we consider the philosophical significance that imaginative resistance has—or, at least, is alleged to have—for issues in moral psychology, theories of cognitive architecture, and modal epistemology.
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  16. Dustin R. Stokes (2006). The Evaluative Character of Imaginative Resistance. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (4):287-405.
    A fiction may prescribe imagining that a pig can talk or tell the future. A fiction may prescribe imagining that torturing innocent persons is a good thing. We generally comply with imaginative prescriptions like the former, but not always with prescriptions like the latter: we imagine non-evaluative fictions without difficulty but sometimes resist imagining value-rich fictions. Thus arises the puzzle of imaginative resistance. Most analyses of the phenomenon focus on the content of the relevant imaginings. The present analysis focuses instead (...)
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  17. Kengo Miyazono & Shen-yi Liao (2016). The Cognitive Architecture of Imaginative Resistance. In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination. 233-246.
    Where is imagination in imaginative resistance? We seek to answer this question by connecting two ongoing lines of inquiry in different subfields of philosophy. In philosophy of mind, philosophers have been trying to understand imaginative attitudes’ place in cognitive architecture. In aesthetics, philosophers have been trying to understand the phenomenon of imaginative resistance. By connecting these two lines of inquiry, we hope to find mutual illumination of an attitude (or cluster of attitudes) and a phenomenon that have vexed philosophers. Our (...)
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  18. David Lewis (1978). Truth in Fiction. American Philosophical Quarterly 15 (1):37--46.
    It is advisable to treat some sorts of discourse about fiction with the aid of an intensional operator "in such-And-Such fiction...." the operator may appear either explicitly or tacitly. It may be analyzed in terms of similarity of worlds, As follows: "in the fiction f, A" means that a is true in those of the worlds where f is told as known fact rather than fiction that differ least from our world, Or from the belief worlds of the community in (...)
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  19.  78
    Shaun Nichols (2004). Imagining and Believing: The Promise of a Single Code. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (2):129-39.
    Recent cognitive accounts of the imagination propose that imagining and believing are in the same “code”. According to the single code hypothesis, cognitive mechanisms that can take input from both imagining and from believing will process imagination-based inputs (“pretense representations”) and isomorphic beliefs in much the same way. In this paper, I argue that the single code hypothesis provides a unified and independently motivated explanation for a wide range of puzzles surrounding fiction.
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  20.  55
    Daniel Jacobson (1996). Sir Philip Sidney's Dilemma: On the Ethical Function of Narrative Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (4):327-336.
  21. Gregory Currie (1995). The Moral Psychology of Fiction. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (2):250 – 259.
    What can we learn from fiction? I argue that we can learn about the consequences of a certain course of action by projecting ourselves, in imagination, into the situation of the fiction's characters.
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  22. Mary Mothersill (2006). Make-Believe Morality and Fictional Worlds. In José Luis Bermúdez & Sebastian Gardner (eds.), Arts and Morality. Routledge 74-94.
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  23. David Lewis (1983). Postscript to Truth in Fiction. In Philosophical Papers. Oxford University Press 276-280.
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  24. Gregory Currie (1995). Imagination as Simulation: Aesthetics Meets Cognitive Science. In Martin Davies & Tony Stone (eds.), Mental Simulation. Blackwell
  25.  6
    Angela B. Moorjani (1992). The Aesthetics of Loss and Lessness. St. Martin's Press.
    This text probes the psychic and social roots of artistic scenarios of loss. Demonstrating that artistic activity is inextricably bonded to imaginary scripts of bereavement and these in turn to patterns of social dominance, the author argues in favor of an "aesthetics of lessness" that is, postmodern resistance to imaginary inscriptions of grief and their misogynist sequels. The book draws on psychoaesthetics, discourse theory and feminist social critiques to analyse literary visual figurations of loss. Included in its analysis of the (...)
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    Mads Nygaard Folkmann (2013). The Aesthetics of Imagination in Design. The MIT Press.
    In "The Aesthetics of Imagination in Design," Mads Folkmann investigates design in both material and immaterial terms.
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  27.  44
    Richard Viladesau (1999). Theological Aesthetics: God in Imagination, Beauty, and Art. OUP Usa.
    In this book, Richard Viladesau contrues Christian theology as a "theological aesthetics". He examines Christian revelation and its presuppositions in relationship to three interconnected meanings of the "aesthetic" in modern thought: human cognition as feeling and imagination; the realm of the beautiful; and the arts. In each area, examples from the arts are correlated with classical and contemporary theological themes.
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    Jan Mieszkowski (2006). Labors of Imagination: Aesthetics and Political Economy From Kant to Althusser. Fordham University Press.
    This book is a major new study of the doctrines of productivity and interest in Romanticism and classical political economy. The author argues that the widespread contemporary embrace of cultural historicism and the rejection of nineteenth-century conceptions of agency have hindered our study of aesthetics and politics. Focusing on the difficulty of coordinating paradigms of intellectual and material labor, Mieszkowski shows that the relationship between the imagination and practical reason is crucial to debates about language and ideology.From the Romantics to (...)
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  29. Ernest Lee Tuveson (1961). The Imagination as a Means of Grace: Locke and the Aesthetics of Romanticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 20 (1):107-109.
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  30.  21
    Shierry Weber Nicholsen (1997). Exact Imagination, Late Work. On Adorno's Aesthetics. MIT Press.
    The five interlocked essays, based on material from Adorno's "aesthetic writings," take up such issues as subjective aesthetic experience, the historicity of ...
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  31.  13
    Mojca Küplen (2015). Beauty, Ugliness and the Free Play of Imagination: An Approach to Kant's Aesthetics. Springer International Publishing.
    At the end of section §6 in the Analytic of the Beautiful, Kant defines taste as the “faculty for judging an object or a kind of representation through a satisfaction or dissatisfaction without any interest”. On the face of it, Kant’s definition of taste includes both; positive and negative judgments of taste. Moreover, Kant’s term ‘dissatisfaction’ implies not only that negative judgments of taste are those of the non-beautiful, but also that of the ugly, depending on the presence of an (...)
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  32. Jonathan M. Weinberg (2008). Configuring the Cognitive Imagination. In Kathleen Stock & Katherine Thomsen-Jones (eds.), New Waves in Aesthetics. Palgrave Macmillan 203-223.
  33. M. A. Goldberg (1958). Wit and the Imagination in Eighteenth-Century Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 16 (4):503-509.
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  34. Shaun Nichols (ed.) (2006). The Architecture of the Imagination: New Essays on Pretence, Possibility, and Fiction. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This volume presents new essays on the propositional imagination by leading researchers. The propositional imagination---the mental capacity we exploit when we imagine that everyone is colour-blind or that Hamlet is a procrastinator---plays an essential role in philosophical theorizing, engaging with fiction, and indeed in everyday life. Yet only recently has there been a systematic attempt to give a cognitive account of the propositional imagination. These thirteen essays, specially written for the volume, capitalize on this recent work, extending the theoretical picture (...)
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  35. Shaun Nichols (ed.) (2006). The Architecture of the Imagination: New Essays on Pretence, Possibility, and Fiction. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This volume presents new essays on the propositional imagination by leading researchers. The propositional imagination---the mental capacity we exploit when we imagine that everyone is colour-blind or that Hamlet is a procrastinator---plays an essential role in philosophical theorizing, engaging with fiction, and indeed in everyday life. Yet only recently has there been a systematic attempt to give a cognitive account of the propositional imagination. These thirteen essays, specially written for the volume, capitalize on this recent work, extending the theoretical picture (...)
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  36.  19
    Paul de Man (1982). Sign and Symbol in Hegel's "Aesthetics". Critical Inquiry 8 (4):761-775.
    We are far removed, in this section of the Encyclopedia on memory, from the mnemotechnic icons described by Francis Yates in The Art of Memory and much closer to Augustine's advice about how to remember and to psalmodize Scripture. Memory, for Hegel, is the learning by rote of names, or of words considered as names, and it can therefore not be separated from the notation, the inscription, or the writing down of these names. In order to remember, one is forced (...)
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  37.  51
    Ronald Hepburn (2001). Theological Aesthetics: God in Imagination, Beauty, and Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 41 (2):232-234.
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    Christopher Williams (2009). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Some Questions in Hume's Aesthetics. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):292-295.
    David Hume's relatively short essay 'Of the Standard of Taste' deals with some of the most difficult issues in aesthetic theory. Apart from giving a few pregnant remarks, near the end of his discussion, on the role of morality in aesthetic evaluation, Hume tries to reconcile the idea that tastes are subjective (in the sense of not being answerable to the facts) with the idea that some objects of taste are better than others. 'Tastes', in this context, are the pleasures (...)
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    E. John (2007). Aesthetics, Imagination, and the Unity of Experience. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):215-216.
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  40.  5
    Giuseppe Patella (2013). The Aesthetics of Resistance. Contemporary Aesthetics 11.
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  41. John Gerard Moore (1998). Wonder and Sublimity: Revisions of a Classical Topos in the Philosophy and Aesthetics of the German Enlightenment. Dissertation, Emory University
    The dissertation considers what is at stake when theoretical wonder ceases to be an originating affect for speculative thought and becomes, instead, a limiting concept for critical philosophy. It attempts to show that: wonder functions for its classical proponents in an entirely different context than that presupposed by the aesthetics of the sublime . This difference can be ascribed to the way in which the feeling of the sublime is operative in the overcoming of modern theodicy , whereas wonder (...)
     
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  42. Jörn Steigerwald (2016). Benjamin Bablot: Dissertation sur le pouvoir de l’imagination des femmes enceintes. In Jörn Steigerwald & Rudolf Behrens (eds.), Aufklärung Und Imagination in Frankreich : Anthologie Und Analyse. De Gruyter 477-502.
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  43. Antonia Soulez (2002). Practice, Theory, Pleasure, and the Problems of Form and Resistance: Shusterman's Pragmatist Aesthetics. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 16 (1):1-9.
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  44. Roger W. H. Savage (2005). Criticism, Imagination, and the Subjectivation of Aesthetics. Philosophy and Literature 29 (1):164-179.
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  45.  9
    Kathleen Stock (2011). Cognitive Theory of Imagination and Aesthetics. In Elisabeth Schellekens & Peter Goldie (eds.), The Aesthetic Mind: Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press 268.
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  46.  4
    Malcolm Heath (2015). The Poetics of Phantasia. Imagination in Ancient Aesthetics_ _, Written by Sheppard, A. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 9 (2):232-234.
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  47.  4
    Simon Goldhill (2015). IMAGINATION. A. Sheppard The Poetics of Phantasia. Imagination in Ancient Aesthetics. Pp. Xiv + 122. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2014. Cased, £65. ISBN: 978-1-4725-0765-5. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 65 (1):68-70.
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    David Granger (2003). Expression, Imagination, and Organic Unity: John Dewey's Aesthetics and Romanticism. Journal of Aesthetic Education 37 (2):46-60.
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    James I. Porter (2014). The Poetics of Phantasia: Imagination in Ancient Aesthetics, by Anne Sheppard. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (2):412-413.
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    Ina Kerner (2014). The Epistemology of Resistance: Gender and Racial Oppression, Epistemic Injustice, and Resistant Imagination. By José Medina. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. Constellations 21 (3):436-438.
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