Search results for 'Affect (Psychology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  35
    Jean-Paul Baldacchino, The Eidetic of Belonging: Towards a Phenomenological Psychology of Affect and Ethno-National Identity.
    In this article I discuss the way affect has featured in discussions of identity, focusing on ethnic and national identities. While affect features in most discussions of ethnicity it has mostly been dismissed as a testament to the irrationality and dangerous qualities of the identity in question. Such discussions adopt a simplistic model of human psychology, usually based on a hydraulic model of the emotions. After considering some recent and pioneering work that foregrounds the role of affectivity in (...)
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  2. Drew Westen (1992). Social Cognition and Social Affect in Psychoanalysis and Cognitive Psychology: From Regression Analysis to Analysis of Regression. In J. Barron, Morris N. Eagle & D. Wolitzky (eds.), Interface of Psychoanalysis and Psychology. American Psychological Association 375--388.
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  3. Lynne Friedli & Robert Stearn (2015). Positive Affect as Coercive Strategy: Conditionality, Activation and the Role of Psychology in UK Government Workfare Programmes. Medical Humanities 41 (1):40-47.
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  4. Charles Shagass (1962). Explorations in the Psychology of Affect. In Jordan M. Scher (ed.), Theories of the Mind. Free Press of Glencoe 122--144.
     
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  5.  22
    Peter T. Dunlap (2012). The Unifying Function of Affect: Founding a Theory of Psychocultural Development in the Epistemology of John Dewey and Carl Jung. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (1):53-68.
    In this paper I explore the shared interest of John Dewey and Carl Jung in the developmental continuity between biological, psychological, and cultural phenomena. Like other first generation psychological theorists, Dewey and Jung thought that psychology could be used to deepen our understanding of this continuity and thus gain a degree of control over human development. While their pursuit of this goal received little institutional support, there is a growing body of theory and practice derived from the new field of (...)
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  6.  17
    Brian Massumi (2002). Parables for the Virtual: Movement, Affect, Sensation. Duke University Press.
    Replacing the traditional opposition of literal and figural with new distinctions between stasis and motion and between actual and virtual,Parables for the ...
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  7.  13
    Drew Daniel (2013). The Melancholy Assemblage: Affect and Epistemology in the English Renaissance. Fordham University Press.
    Placing readings of early modern painting and literature in conversation with psychoanalytic theory and assemblage theory, this book argues that, far from isolating its sufferers, melancholy brings people together.
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  8. Yirmiyahu Yovel (ed.) (1999). Desire and Affect : Spinoza as Psychologist ; Papers Presented at the Third Jerusalem Conference (Ethica Iii). Little Room Press ; Distributed by Fordham University Press.
  9. John Heron (1992). Feeling and Personhood Psychology in Another Key. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  10. Jesse M. Bering (2006). The Folk Psychology of Souls. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):453-+.
    The present article examines how people’s belief in an afterlife, as well as closely related supernatural beliefs, may open an empirical backdoor to our understanding of the evolution of human social cognition. Recent findings and logic from the cognitive sciences contribute to a novel theory of existential psychology, one that is grounded in the tenets of Darwinian natural selection. Many of the predominant questions of existential psychology strike at the heart of cognitive science. They involve: causal attribution (why is mortal (...)
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  11.  55
    Mog Stapleton (2012). Proper Embodiment: The Role of the Body in Affect and Cognition. Dissertation, University of Edinburgh
    Embodied cognitive science has argued that cognition is embodied principally in virtue of grossmorphological and sensorimotor features. This thesis argues that cognition is also internally embodied in affective and fine-grained physiological features whose transformative roles remain mostlyunnoticed in contemporary cognitive science. I call this ‘proper embodiment’. I approach this larger subject by examining various emotion theories in philosophy and psychology. These tend to emphasiseone of the many gross components of emotional processes, such as ‘feeling’ or ‘judgement’ to thedetriment of the (...)
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  12.  9
    Eugene Marshall (2014). The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza's Science of the Mind. OUP Oxford.
    Eugene Marshall presents an original, systematic account of Spinoza's philosophy of mind, in which the mind is presented as an affective mechanism that, when rational, behaves as a spiritual automaton. He explores key themes in Spinoza's thought, and illuminates his philosophical and ethical project in a striking new way.
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  13.  15
    Leslie Paul Thiele (2006). The Heart of Judgment: Practical Wisdom, Neuroscience, and Narrative. Cambridge University Press.
    The Heart of Judgment explores the nature, historical significance, and contemporary relevance of practical wisdom. Primarily a work in moral and political thought, it also relies extensively on the latest research in cognitive neuroscience to confirm and extend our understanding of the faculty of judgment. Ever since the ancient Greeks first discussed practical wisdom, the faculty of judgment has been an important topic for philosophers and political theorists. It remains one of the virtues most demanded of our public officials. The (...)
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  14. Neil Joseph MacKinnon (2010). Self, Identity, and Social Institutions. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Introduction -- Cultural theories of people -- Identities in standard English -- Language and social institutions -- The cultural self -- The self's identities -- Theories of identities and selves -- Theories of norms and institutions -- Social reality and human subjectivity.
     
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  15.  28
    Charles Altieri (2003). The Particulars of Rapture: An Aesthetics of the Affects. Cornell University Press.
    " "The Particulars of Rapture proposes treating affects in adverbial rather than in adjectival terms, emphasizing the way in which text and paintings shape ...
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  16.  4
    Christopher Castiglia (2008). Interior States: Institutional Consciousness and the Inner Life of Democracy in the Antebellum United States. Duke University Press.
    "This book combines scope and depth in a way that will remind readers of some of the classics--F. O. Matthiessen, Leo Marx, Ann Douglas, Jane Tompkins.
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  17.  9
    Zachary S. Horne, Methodological Issues in Epistemology and Moral Psychology.
    Between 1960 and 1999, it was quite common for philosophers to rely almost completely on a priori methods to advance their arguments ; in a recent study by Knobe, the majority of papers sampled from this period used strictly a priori methods. In contrast, in the last decade and a half, many philosophers' strategy for making progress on philosophical questions has changed. Philosophers are now relying more heavily on empirical data—including running their own observational and experimental studies—in order to support (...)
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  18.  24
    Jacob Miguel Vigil (2009). A Socio-Relational Framework of Sex Differences in the Expression of Emotion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):375.
    Despite a staggering body of research demonstrating sex differences in expressed emotion, very few theoretical models (evolutionary or non-evolutionary) offer a critical examination of the adaptive nature of such differences. From the perspective of a socio-relational framework, emotive behaviors evolved to promote the attraction and aversion of different types of relationships by advertising the two most parsimonious properties of reciprocity potential, or perceived attractiveness as a prospective social partner. These are the individual's (a) perceived capacity or ability to provide expedient (...)
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  19. Edoardo Zamuner (2011). A Theory of Affect Perception. Mind and Language 26 (4):436-451.
    What do we see when we look at someone's expression of fear? I argue that one of the things that we see is fear itself. I support this view by developing a theory of affect perception. The theory involves two claims. One is that expressions are patterns of facial changes that carry information about affects. The other is that the visual system extracts and processes such information. In particular, I argue that the visual system functions to detect the affects (...)
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  20.  3
    Gregory E. Kaebnick (2016). The Psychology of Autonomy. Hastings Center Report 46 (3):2-2.
    In May 2016, right around the time that this issue of the Hastings Center Report should be published, The Hastings Center is holding a conference in New York City titled “Bioethics Meets Moral Psychology.” The goal of the conference is to consider the lessons that bioethicists should learn from the raft of literature now accumulating on how the mental processes of perception, emotion, and thinking affect things that bioethicists care about, from the education of health care professionals to the (...)
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  21.  60
    Bryce Huebner (2015). Do Emotions Play a Constitutive Role in Moral Cognition? Topoi 34 (2):427-440.
    Recent behavioral experiments, along with imaging experiments and neuropsychological studies appear to support the hypothesis that emotions play a causal or constitutive role in moral judgment. Those who resist this hypothesis tend to suggest that affective mechanisms are better suited to play a modulatory role in moral cognition. But I argue that claims about the role of emotion in moral cognition frame the debate in ways that divert attention away from other plausible hypotheses. I suggest that the available data may (...)
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  22.  47
    Ian McCready-Flora (2014). Aristotle's Cognitive Science: Belief, Affect and Rationality. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (2):394-435.
    I offer a novel interpretation of Aristotle's psychology and notion of rationality, which draws the line between animal and specifically human cognition. Aristotle distinguishes belief (doxa), a form of rational cognition, from imagining (phantasia), which is shared with non-rational animals. We are, he says, “immediately affected” by beliefs, but respond to imagining “as if we were looking at a picture.” Aristotle's argument has been misunderstood; my interpretation explains and motivates it. Rationality includes a filter that interrupts the pathways between cognition (...)
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  23.  88
    Luc Ciompi (2003). Reflections on the Role of Emotions in Consciousness and Subjectivity, From the Perspective of Affect-Logic. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):181-196.
    The phenomena of human consciousness and subjectivity are explored from the perspective of affect-logic, a comprehensive meta-theory of the interactions between emotion and cognition based mainly on cognitive and social psychology, psychopathology, neurobiology Piaget?s genetic epistemology, psychoanalysis, and evolutionary science. According to this theory, overt or covert affective-cognitive interactions are obligatorily present in all mental activity, seemingly ?neutral? thinking included. Emotions continually exert numerous so-called operator-effects, both linear and nonlinear, on attention, on memory and on comprehensive thought, or logic (...)
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  24.  3
    Scott D. Gelfand (forthcoming). Using Insights From Applied Moral Psychology to Promote Ethical Behavior Among Engineering Students and Professional Engineers. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-22.
    In this essay I discuss a novel engineering ethics class that has the potential to significantly decrease the likelihood that students will inadvertently or unintentionally act unethically in the future. This class is different from standard engineering ethics classes in that it focuses on the issue of why people act unethically and how students can avoid a variety of hurdles to ethical behavior. I do not deny that it is important for students to develop cogent moral reasoning and ethical decision-making (...)
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  25.  4
    Heidi Albisser Schleger, Nicole R. Oehninger & Stella Reiter-Theil (2011). Avoiding Bias in Medical Ethical Decision-Making. Lessons to Be Learnt From Psychology Research. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):155-162.
    When ethical decisions have to be taken in critical, complex medical situations, they often involve decisions that set the course for or against life-sustaining treatments. Therefore the decisions have far-reaching consequences for the patients, their relatives, and often for the clinical staff. Although the rich psychology literature provides evidence that reasoning may be affected by undesired influences that may undermine the quality of the decision outcome, not much attention has been given to this phenomenon in health care or ethics consultation. (...)
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  26.  19
    Clifford Sosis (2014). Hedonic Possibilities and Heritability Statistics. Philosophical Psychology 27 (5):681-702.
  27.  11
    Richard D. Wright & Michael R. W. Dawson (1994). To What Extent Do Beliefs Affect Apparent Motion? Philosophical Psychology 7 (4):471-491.
    A number of studies in the apparent motion literature were examined using the cognitive penetrability criterion to determine the extent to which beliefs affect the perception of apparent motion. It was found that the interaction between the perceptual processes mediating apparent motion and higher order processes appears to be limited. In addition, perceptual and inferential beliefs appear to have different effects on perceived motion optimality and direction. Our findings suggest that the system underlying apparent motion perception has more than (...)
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  28.  6
    Mpine Makoe (2008). Using Phenomenological Psychology to Analyse Distance Education Students' Experiences and Conceptions of Learning. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology: Phenomenology and Education: Special Edition 8:1-11.
    Studies on learning have tended to endorse the importance of knowledge rather than the significance of the cultural contexts embedded in the different histories and biographies of learners. In order to investigate the relationship between these contexts and students' conceptions of learning, this study focuses on South African distance students' accounts of their personal experience and understanding of learning, using Giorgi's phenomenological psychology method to explore the learners' histories and aspirations as they construct and negotiate the meaning they attach to (...)
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  29.  4
    Elizabeth Soliday & Annette L. Stanton (1995). Deceived Versus Nondeceived Participants' Perceptions of Scientific and Applied Psychology. Ethics and Behavior 5 (1):87 – 104.
    Research examining the possible effects of deceptive research participation on participants' perceptions of psychology has yielded equivocal results. The present study's goal was to clarify the possible effects of participation in mildly deceptive research on participants' impressions of scientific and applied psychology. Participants (N = 112) were randomly assigned to one of six experimental conditions: active groups receiving negative, positive, or no feedback, or passive groups receiving negative, positive, or no feedback. Following participation, participants completed measures of impressions of psychotherapy (...)
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  30. William Ascher & Barbara Hirschfelder-Ascher (2004). Revitalizing Political Psychology: The Legacy of Harold D. Lasswell. Psychology Press.
    The goal of this book is to recapture the diminished roles of affect, psychological needs, and the psychodynamic mechanisms that are crucial for understanding political behavior by explaining and extending the contributions of Harold D. Lasswell, the dominant figure in political psychology in the mid-twentieth-century. Although Lasswell was best known for applying psychodynamic theories to politics, this book also demonstrates how his framework accommodated for cognitive processes and social interactions ranging from communications to policy-making. The authors use Lasswell's contributions (...)
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  31. Isabelle Brocas & Juan D. Carrillo (eds.) (2003). The Psychology of Economic Decisions: Volume One: Rationality and Well-Being. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Psychologists and economists often ask similar questions about human behaviour. This volume brings together contributions from leaders in both disciplines.The editorial introduction discusses methodological differences between the two which have until now limited the development of mutually beneficial lines of research. Psychologists have objected to what they see as an excessive formalism in economic modelling and an unrealistic degree of sophistication in the behaviour of individuals, while economists criticize the absence of a general psychological framework into which most results can (...)
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  32. Isabelle Brocas & Juan D. Carrillo (eds.) (2003). The Psychology of Economic Decisions: Volume One: Rationality and Well-Being. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Psychologists and economists often ask similar questions about human behaviour. This volume brings together contributions from leaders in both disciplines.The editorial introduction discusses methodological differences between the two which have until now limited the development of mutually beneficial lines of research. Psychologists have objected to what they see as an excessive formalism in economic modelling and an unrealistic degree of sophistication in the behaviour of individuals, while economists criticize the absence of a general psychological framework into which most results can (...)
     
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  33. Arnold I. Goldberg (ed.) (2000). Progress in Self Psychology, V. 16: How Responsive Should We Be? Routledge.
    Volume 16 of Progress in Self Psychology, _How Responsive Should We Be_, illuminates the continuing tension between Kohut's emphasis on the patient's subjective experience and the post-Kohutian intersubjectivists' concern with the therapist's own subjectivity by focusing on issues of therapeutic posture and degree of therapist activity. Teicholz provides an integrative context for examining this tension by discussing affect as the common denominator underlying the analyst's empathy, subjectivity, and authenticity. Responses to the tension encompass the stance of intersubjective contextualism, advocacy (...)
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  34. Alfred R. Mele (ed.) (2015). Surrounding Free Will: Philosophy, Psychology, Neuroscience. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This volume showcases cutting-edge scholarship from The Big Questions in Free Will project, funded by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation and directed by Alfred R. Mele. It explores the subject of free will from the perspectives of neuroscience; social, cognitive, and developmental psychology; and philosophy. The volume consists of fourteen new articles and an introduction from top-ranked contributors, all of whom bring fresh perspectives to the question of free will. They investigate questions such as: How do children conceive (...)
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  35. Dana S. Dunn, Janie H. Wilson, James Freeman & Jeffrey R. Stowell (2011). Best Practices for Technology-Enhanced Teaching and Learning: Connecting to Psychology and the Social Sciences. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The use of technology and teaching techniques derived from technology is currently a bourgeoning topic in higher education. Teachers at all levels and types of institutions want to know how these new technologies will affect what happens in and outside of the classroom. Many teachers have already embraced some of these technologies but remain uncertain about their educational efficacy. Other teachers have waited because they are reluctant to try tools or techniques that remain unproven or, as is often the (...)
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  36.  66
    Sandra Pellizzoni, Vittorio Girotto & Luca Surian (2010). Beliefs and Moral Valence Affect Intentionality Attributions: The Case of Side Effects. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (2):201-209.
    Do moral appraisals shape judgments of intentionality? A traditional view is that individuals first evaluate whether an action has been carried out intentionally. Then they use this evaluation as input for their moral judgments. Recent studies, however, have shown that individuals’ moral appraisals can also influence their intentionality attributions. They attribute intentionality to the negative side effect of a given action, but not to the positive side effect of the same action. In three experiments, we show that this asymmetry is (...)
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  37. William D. Casebeer & Patricia S. Churchland (2003). The Neural Mechanisms of Moral Cognition: A Multiple-Aspect Approach to Moral Judgment and Decision-Making. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):169-194.
    We critically review themushrooming literature addressing the neuralmechanisms of moral cognition (NMMC), reachingthe following broad conclusions: (1) researchmainly focuses on three inter-relatedcategories: the moral emotions, moral socialcognition, and abstract moral reasoning. (2)Research varies in terms of whether it deploysecologically valid or experimentallysimplified conceptions of moral cognition. Themore ecologically valid the experimentalregime, the broader the brain areas involved.(3) Much of the research depends on simplifyingassumptions about the domain of moral reasoningthat are motivated by the need to makeexperimental progress. This is a (...)
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  38.  92
    Patricia Churchland (2003). The Neural Mechanisms of Moral Cognition: A Multiple-Aspect Approach to Moral Judgment and Decision-Making. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):169-194.
    We critically review themushrooming literature addressing the neuralmechanisms of moral cognition (NMMC), reachingthe following broad conclusions: (1) researchmainly focuses on three inter-relatedcategories: the moral emotions, moral socialcognition, and abstract moral reasoning. (2)Research varies in terms of whether it deploysecologically valid or experimentallysimplified conceptions of moral cognition. Themore ecologically valid the experimentalregime, the broader the brain areas involved.(3) Much of the research depends on simplifyingassumptions about the domain of moral reasoningthat are motivated by the need to makeexperimental progress. This is a (...)
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  39.  17
    Valerie Thompson & Kinga Morsanyi (2012). Analytic Thinking: Do You Feel Like It? Mind and Society 11 (1):93-105.
    A major challenge for Dual Process Theories of reasoning is to predict the circumstances under which intuitive answers reached on the basis of Type 1 processing are kept or discarded in favour of analytic, Type 2 processing (Thompson 2009 ). We propose that a key determinant of the probability that Type 2 processes intervene is the affective response that accompanies Type 1 processing. This affective response arises from the fluency with which the initial answer is produced, such that fluently produced (...)
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  40.  8
    Mitchell Berbrier (1997). From Logos to Pathos in Social Psychology and Academic Argumentation: Reconciling Postmodernism and Positivism in a Sociology of Persuasion. Argumentation 11 (1):35-50.
    This paper argues that one can empirically test, via positivist methods, the post-modern attack on positivist epistemologies: Postmodern perspectives hold Knowledge and Truth to be intersubjective, consensus-driven social constructions. But traditional scientific approaches to knowledge, exemplified here by the cognitive social psychology of persuasion, seem oblivious to this and continue to detach the study of attitudes, beliefs, and emotions from that of knowledge, facts, and reason. Abandoning these artificial distinctions in both epistemology and method would enable this social psychology, reconstituted (...)
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  41. H. Noble (1908). Les États Affectifs.
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  42. Calvin F. Nodine & James H. Korn (1969). "Role of Affect in Short-Term Memory for Paired Associates": Erratum. Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (1, Pt.1):167-167.
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  43. Marianne Janack (2004). Changing the Epistemological and Psychological Subject: William James's Psychology Without Borders. Metaphilosophy 35 (1/2):160-77.
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  44.  24
    Michelle Maiese (2014). Moral Cognition, Affect, and Psychopathy. Philosophical Psychology 27 (6):807-828.
    Few theorists would challenge the idea that affect and emotion directly influence decision-making and moral judgment. There is good reason to think that they also significantly assist in decision-making and judgment, and in fact are necessary for fully effective moral cognition. However, they are not sufficient. Deliberation and more reflective thought processes likewise play a crucial role, and in fact are inseparable from affective processes. I will argue that while the dual-process account of moral judgment set forth by Craigie (...)
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  45.  32
    Jonathan Cohen & Matthew Fulkerson (2014). Affect, Rationalization, and Motivation. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (1):103-118.
    Recently, a number of writers have presented an argument to the effect that leading causal theories make available accounts of affect’s motivational role, but at the cost of failing to understand affect’s rationalizing role. Moreover, these writers have gone on to argue that these considerations support the adoption of an alternative (“evaluationist”) conception of pleasure and pain that, in their view, successfully explains both the motivational and rationalizing roles of affective experience. We believe that this argument from rationalization (...)
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  46.  2
    James Phillips (2016). Painful Affect and Other Questions About the Ipseity Model of Schizophrenia. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (3):209-212.
    In commenting on Hamm, Buck, and Lysaker’s “Reconciling the Ipseity-Disturbance Model with the Painful Affect in Schizophrenia”, let me first acknowledge the authors’ fine work in delineating this issue. They review very clearly the history of theoretical models of schizophrenia, including biological, psychoanalytic, and phenomenological approaches. They emphasize the need to include accounts of subjective experiences of persons with schizophrenia, and for this they underline the role of phenomenological research. In the latter, they note an emphasis on cognitive and (...)
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  47.  6
    Howard Shevrin (2000). The Experimental Investigation of Unconscious Conflict, Unconscious Affect, and Unconscious Signal Anxiety. In Max Velmans (ed.), Investigating Phenomenal Consciousness: New Methodologies and Maps. Advances in Consciousness Research, Vol. 13. John Benjamins 33-65.
  48.  21
    Tim Dalgleish (1997). An Anti-Anti-Essentialist View of the Emotions: A Reply to Kupperman. Philosophical Psychology 10 (1):85-90.
    Kupperman (1995) advances an anti-essentialist view of emotions in which he suggests that there can be emotion without feeling or affect, emotion without corresponding motivation, and emotion without an intentional relation to an object such that the emotion is about that object in some way. In this reply to Kupperman's essay, I suggest a number of problems with his rejection of the essentialist position. I argue that in his discussion of feelings Kupperman is crucially not clear about the distinction (...)
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  49.  6
    James V. Kohl (2012). Human Pheromones and Food Odors: Epigenetic Influences on the Socioaffective Nature of Evolved Behaviors. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 2.
    Background: Olfactory cues directly link the environment to gene expression. Two types of olfactory cues, food odors and social odors, alter genetically predisposed hormone-mediated activity in the mammalian brain. Methods: The honeybee is a model organism for understanding the epigenetic link from food odors and social odors to neural networks of the mammalian brain, which ultimately determine human behavior. Results: Pertinent aspects that extend the honeybee model to human behavior include bottom-up followed by top-down gene, cell, tissue, organ, organ-system, and (...)
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  50.  6
    Howard L. Parsons (1958). Reason and Affect: Some of Their Relations and Functions. Journal of Philosophy 55 (March):221-229.
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