Search results for 'Affective neuroscience' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  99
    Stephen Asma, Jaak Panksepp, Rami Gabriel & Glennon Curran (2012). Philosophical Implications of Affective Neuroscience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (3-4):6-48.
    These papers are based on a Symposium at the COGSCI Conference in 2010. 1. Naturalizing the Mammalian Mind (Jaak Panksepp) 2. Modularity in Cognitive Psychology and Affective Neuroscience (Rami Gabriel) 3. Affective Neuroscience and the Philosophy of Self (Stephen Asma and Tom Greif) 4. Affective Neuroscience and Law (Glennon Curran and Rami Gabriel).
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  2.  16
    Pereira A. Almada Lf (2013). What Affective Neuroscience Means for Science of Consciousness. Mens Sana Monographs 11 (1):253.
    The field of affective neuroscience has emerged from the efforts of Jaak Panksepp in the 1990s and reinforced by the work of, among others, Joseph LeDoux in the 2000s. It is based on the ideas that affective processes are supported by brain structures that appeared earlier in the phylogenetic scale (as the periaqueductal gray area), they run in parallel with cognitive processes, and can influence behaviour independently of cognitive judgements. This kind of approach contrasts with the hegemonic (...)
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  3.  4
    Leonardo Ferreira Almada, Alfredo Pereira Jr & Claudia Carrara-Augustenborg (2013). What Affective Neuroscience Means for Science of Consciousness. Mens Sana Monographs 11 (1):253.
    The field of affective neuroscience has emerged from the efforts of Jaak Panksepp in the 1990s and reinforced by the work of, among others, Joseph LeDoux in the 2000s. It is based on the ideas that affective processes are supported by brain structures that appeared earlier in the phylogenetic scale (as the periaqueductal gray area), they run in parallel with cognitive processes, and can influence behaviour independently of cognitive judgements. This kind of approach contrasts with the hegemonic (...)
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  4. Janna Hastings, Werner Ceusters, Kevin Mulligan & Barry Smith (2012). Annotating Affective Neuroscience Data with the Emotion Ontology. In Third International Conference on Biomedical Ontology. ICBO 1-5.
    The Emotion Ontology is an ontology covering all aspects of emotional and affective mental functioning. It is being developed following the principles of the OBO Foundry and Ontological Realism. This means that in compiling the ontology, we emphasize the importance of the nature of the entities in reality that the ontology is describing. One of the ways in which realism-based ontologies are being successfully used within biomedical science is in the annotation of scientific research results in publicly available databases. (...)
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  5.  7
    Jaak Panksepp & Douglas Watt (2011). What is Basic About Basic Emotions? Lasting Lessons From Affective Neuroscience. Emotion Review 3 (4):387-396.
    A cross-species affective neuroscience strategy for understanding the primary-process (basic) emotions is defended. The need for analyzing the brain and mind in terms of evolutionary stratification of functions into at least primary (instinctual), secondary (learned), and tertiary (thought-related) processes is advanced. When viewed in this context, the contentious battles between basic-emotion theorists and dimensional-constructivist approaches can be seen to be largely nonsubstantial differences among investigators working at different levels of analysis.
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  6.  22
    G. Colombetti (2013). Some Ideas for the Integration of Neurophenomenology and Affective Neuroscience. Constructivist Foundations 8 (3):288-297.
    Context: Affective neuroscience has not developed first-person methods for the generation of first-person data. This neglect is problematic, because emotion experience is a central dimension of affectivity. Problem: I propose that augmenting affective neuroscience with a neurophenomenological method can help address long-standing questions in emotion theory, such as: Do different emotions come with unique, distinctive patterns of brain and bodily activity? How do emotion experience, bodily feelings and brain and bodily activity relate to one another? Method: (...)
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  7.  87
    H. M. Ravven (2003). Spinoza’s Anticipation of Contemporary Affective Neuroscience. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):257-290.
    Spinoza speculated on how ethics could emerge from biology and psychology rather than disrupt them and recent evidence suggests he might have gotten it right. His radical deconstruction and reconstruction of ethics is supported by a number of avenues of research in the cognitive and neurosciences. This paper gathers together and presents a composite picture of recent research that supports Spinoza’s theory of the emotions and of the natural origins of ethics. It enumerates twelve naturalist claims of Spinoza that now (...)
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  8.  9
    Tim Dalgleish, Barnaby D. Dunn & Dean Mobbs (2009). Affective Neuroscience: Past, Present, and Future. Emotion Review 1 (4):355-368.
    The discipline of affective neuroscience is concerned with the underlying neural substrates of emotion and mood. This review presents an historical overview of the pioneering work in affective neuroscience of James and Lange, Cannon and Bard, and Hess, Papez, and MacLean before summarizing the current state of research on the brain regions identified by these seminal researchers. We also discuss the more recent strides made in the field of affective neuroscience. A final section considers (...)
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  9.  10
    D. Watt (2005). Panksepp?S Common Sense View of Affective Neuroscience is Not the Commonsense View in Large Areas of Neuroscience. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):81-88.
    Jaak Panksepp’s article ‘Affective Consciousness: Core Emotional Feelings in Animals and Humans’ is a excellent review and summary by a leading empirical contributor whose work for many years has been running counter to reigning behavioristic premises in neuroscience. It may unfortunately be true that he could not get this review published in many neuroscience journals because it attacks too many sacred cows. Panksepp has given readers of Consciousness and Cognition a nicely condensed summary of much of his (...)
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  10.  45
    Louis C. Charland (2007). Affective Neuroscience and Addiction. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):20 – 21.
    The author comments on the article “The neurobiology of addiction: Implications for voluntary control of behavior,‘ by S. E. Hyman. Hyman suggests that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The author states that brain and neurochemical systems are involved in addiction. He also suggests that neuroscience can link the diseased brain processes in addiction to the moral struggles of the addicts. Accession Number: 24077919; Authors: Charland, Louis C. 1; Email Address: charland@uwo.ca; Affiliations: 1: University of (...)
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  11.  23
    Allan N. Schore (2005). Developmental Affective Neuroscience Describes Mechanisms at the Core of Dynamic Systems Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):217-218.
    Lewis describes the developmental core of dynamic systems theory. I offer recent data from developmental neuroscience on the sequential experience-dependent maturation of components of the limbic system over the stages of infancy. Increasing interconnectivity within the vertically integrated limbic system allows for more complex appraisals of emotional value. The earliest organization of limbic structures has an enduring impact on all later emotional processing.
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  12.  9
    Richard J. Davidson (1998). Affective Style and Affective Disorders: Perspectives From Affective Neuroscience. Cognition and Emotion 12 (3):307-330.
  13.  21
    Paul Thagard (2007). The Moral Psychology of Conflicts of Interest: Insights From Affective Neuroscience. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (4):367–380.
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  14.  55
    Dan J. Stein, Mark Solms & Jack van Honk (2006). The Cognitive-Affective Neuroscience of the Unconscious. CNS Spectrums 11 (8):580-583.
  15.  14
    Andrew Tallon (2009). Levinas's Ethical Horizon, Affective Neuroscience, and Social Field Theory. Levinas Studies 4:47-67.
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  16.  8
    Donné van der Westhuizen & Mark Solms (2015). Social Dominance and the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales. Consciousness and Cognition 33:90-111.
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  17.  17
    Stephen T. Asma (2012). Affective Neuroscience and the Philosophy of Self. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19.
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  18.  10
    Douglas F. Watt (1999). At the Intersection of Emotion and Consciousness: Affective Neuroscience and Extended Reticular Thalamic Activating System (ERTAS) Theories of Consciousness. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & David J. Chalmers (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness Iii. MIT Press 215--229.
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  19.  2
    Alessandro Grecucci & Remo Job (2015). Rethinking Reappraisal: Insights From Affective Neuroscience. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  20.  6
    Edmund T. Rolls (2007). The Affective Neuroscience of Consciousness: Higher Order Syntactic Thoughts, Dual Routes to Emotion and Action, and Consciousness. In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge
  21.  21
    R. Ellis (2000). Review of “Affective Neuroscience” by Jaak Panksepp. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Emotion 1 (2):313-318.
  22.  2
    Chandra Sripada, John D. Swain, S. Shaun Ho & James E. Swain (2014). Automatic Goals and Conscious Regulation in Social Cognitive Affective Neuroscience. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):156-157.
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  23.  1
    J. Panksepp (2015). Toward the Constitution of Emotional Feelings: Synergistic Lessons From Izard's Differential Emotions Theory and Affective Neuroscience. Emotion Review 7 (2):110-115.
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  24. R. Ellis (2000). Jaak Panksepp: Affective Neuroscience. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (2):313-317.
     
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  25. Jaak Panksepp (2007). Affective Neuroscience and the Ancestral Sources of Human Feelings. In Henri Cohen & Brigitte Stemmer (eds.), Consciousness and Cognition: Fragments of Mind and Brain. Elxevier Academic Press
     
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  26. D. F. Watt (1999). At the Intersection of Emotion and Consciousness: Review of Panksepp, Affective Neuroscience. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (6/7).
  27.  33
    Mary Helen Immordino-Yang (2011). Implications of Affective and Social Neuroscience for Educational Theory. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):98-103.
    The past decade has seen major advances in cognitive, affective and social neuroscience that have the potential to revolutionize educational theories about learning. The importance of emotion and social learning has long been recognized in education, but due to technological limitations in neuroscience research techniques, treatment of these topics in educational theory has largely not had the benefit of biological evidence to date. In this article, I lay out two general, complementary findings that have emerged from the (...)
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  28. Richard D. R. Lane, L. Nadel & G. L. Ahern (eds.) (2000). Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotion. Series in Affective Science. Oxford University Press.
  29.  3
    Robin Mackenzie (2011). How the Politics of Inclusion/Exclusion and the Neuroscience of Dehumanization/Rehumanization Can Contribute to Animal Activists' Strategies: Bestia Sacer II. Society and Animals 19 (4):407-424.
    Juxtaposing the continental philosophy of inclusion/exclusion and the cognitive and affective neuroscience of dehumanization, infrahumanization, and rehumanization may inform animal activists’ strategies. Both fields focus upon how we decide who counts and who doesn’t. Decisions over who’s human and who isn’t are not simply about species membership but involve biopolitical value judgments over who we wish to include or exclude. Posthumanists seek to disrupt the biopolitics of inclusion/exclusion, partly to heal ethical and political relations between human and nonhuman (...)
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  30. Peter Railton (2014). The Affective Dog and its Rational Tale. Ethics 124 (4):813-859.
    Intuition—spontaneous, nondeliberative assessment—has long been indispensable in theoretical and practical philosophy alike. Recent research by psychologists and experimental philosophers has challenged our understanding of the nature and authority of moral intuitions by tracing them to “fast,” “automatic,” “button-pushing” responses of the affective system. This view of the affective system contrasts with a growing body of research in affective neuroscience which suggests that it is instead a flexible learning system that generates and updates a multidimensional evaluative landscape (...)
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  31.  24
    Jan Slaby (2010). Steps Towards a Critical Neuroscience. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):397-416.
    This paper introduces the motivation and idea behind the recently founded interdisciplinary initiative Critical Neuroscience ( http://www.critical-neuroscience.org ). Critical Neuroscience is an approach that strives to understand, explain, contextualize, and, where called for, critique developments in and around the social, affective, and cognitive neurosciences with the aim to create the competencies needed to responsibly deal with new challenges and concerns emerging in relation to the brain sciences. It addresses scholars in the humanities as well as, importantly, (...)
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  32. Mog Stapleton (2013). Steps to a "Properly Embodied" Cognitive Science. Cognitive Systems Research 22 (June):1-11.
    Cognitive systems research has predominantly been guided by the historical distinction between emotion and cognition, and has focused its efforts on modelling the “cognitive” aspects of behaviour. While this initially meant modelling only the control system of cognitive creatures, with the advent of “embodied” cognitive science this expanded to also modelling the interactions between the control system and the external environment. What did not seem to change with this embodiment revolution, however, was the attitude towards (...)
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  33.  26
    Christian Coseru (2014). Buddhism, Comparative Neurophilosophy, and Human Flourishing. Zygon 49 (1):208-219.
    Owen Flanagan's The Bodhisattva's Brain represents an ambitious foray into cross-cultural neurophilosophy, making a compelling, though not entirely unproblematic, case for naturalizing Buddhist philosophy. While the naturalist account of mental causation challenges certain Buddhist views about the mind, the Buddhist analysis of mind and mental phenomena is far more complex than the book suggests. Flanagan is right to criticize the Buddhist claim that there could be mental states that are not reducible to their neural correlates; however, when the mental states (...)
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  34.  17
    Adrian Johnston & Catherine Malabou (2013). Self and Emotional Life: Philosophy, Psychoanalysis, and Neuroscience. Cup.
    <span class='Hi'>Adrian</span> <span class='Hi'>Johnston</span> and Catherine Malabou defy theoretical humanities' deeply-entrenched resistance to engagements with the life sciences. Rather than treat biology and its branches as hopelessly reductive and politically suspect, they view recent advances in neurobiology and its adjacent scientific fields as providing crucial catalysts to a radical rethinking of <span class='Hi'>subjectivity</span>. Merging three distinct disciplines--European philosophy from Descartes to the present, Freudian-Lacanian psychoanalysis, and affective neuroscience--<span class='Hi'>Johnston</span> and Malabou triangulate the emotional life of (...) subjects as conceptualized in philosophy and psychoanalysis with neuroscience. Their experiments yield different outcomes. <span class='Hi'>Johnston</span> finds psychoanalysis and neurobiology have the potential to enrich each other, though affective neuroscience demands a reconsideration of whether affects can be unconscious. Investigating this vexed issue has profound implications for theoretical and practical analysis, as well as philosophical understandings of the emotions. Malabou believes scientific explorations of the brain seriously problematize established notions of affective <span class='Hi'>subjectivity</span> in Continental philosophy and Freudian-Lacanian analysis. She confronts philosophy and psychoanalysis with something neither field has seriously considered: the concept of wonder and the cold, disturbing visage of those who have been affected by disease or injury, such that they are no longer affected emotionally. At stake in this exchange are some of philosophy's most important claims concerning the relationship between the subjective mind and the objective body, the structures and dynamics of the unconscious dimensions of mental life, the role emotion plays in making us human, and the functional differences between philosophy and science. (shrink)
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  35.  12
    Jean Decety, Kalina J. Michalska & Katherine D. Kinzler (2011). The Developmental Neuroscience of Moral Sensitivity. Emotion Review 3 (3):305-307.
    Though traditional accounts of moral development focus on the development of rational and deliberate thinking, recent work in developmental affective neuroscience suggests that moral cognition is tightly related to affective and emotional processing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies show age-related changes in response to empathy-eliciting stimuli, with a gradual shift from the monitoring of somatovisceral responses in young children mediated by the amygdala, insula and medial aspect of the orbitofrontal cortex, to the executive control and evaluation of (...)
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  36.  30
    G. R. Semin & Eliot R. Smith (eds.) (2008). Embodied Grounding: Social, Cognitive, Affective, and Neuroscientific Approaches. Cambridge University Press.
    In recent years there has been an increasing awareness that a comprehensive understanding of language, cognitive and affective processes, and social and interpersonal phenomena cannot be achieved without understanding the ways these processes are grounded in bodily states. The term ‘embodiment’ captures the common denominator of these developments, which come from several disciplinary perspectives ranging from neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology, and affective sciences. For the first time, this volume brings together these varied developments under one umbrella (...)
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  37.  21
    Richard D. R. Lane, L. Nadel, G. L. Ahern, J. Allen & Alfred W. Kaszniak (eds.) (2000). Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotion. Oxford University Press.
    This book, a member of the Series in Affective Science, is a unique interdisciplinary sequence of articles on the cognitive neuroscience of emotion by some of ...
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  38.  54
    Andrea Scarantino (2009). Core Affect and Natural Affective Kinds. Philosophy of Science 76 (5):940-957.
    It is commonly assumed that the scientific study of emotions should focus on discrete categories such as fear, anger, sadness, joy, disgust, shame, guilt, and so on. This view has recently been questioned by the emergence of the “core affect movement,” according to which discrete emotions are not natural kinds. Affective science, it is argued, should focus on core affect, a blend of hedonic and arousal values. Here, I argue that the empirical evidence does not support the thesis that (...)
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  39.  5
    W. P. Seeley (2013). Art, Meaning, and Perception: A Question of Methods for a Cognitive Neuroscience of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (4):443-460.
    Neuroscience of art might give us traction with aesthetic issues. However it can be seen to have trouble modeling the artistically salient semantic properties of artworks. So if meaning really matters, and it does, even in aesthetic contexts, the prospects for this nascent field are dim. The issue boils down to a question of whether or not we can get a grip on the kinds of constraints present and available to guide interpretive behavior in our engagement with works of (...)
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  40. Donald D. Price, James J. Barrell & Pierre Rainville (2002). Integrating Experiential–Phenomenological Methods and Neuroscience to Study Neural Mechanisms of Pain and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):593-608.
    Understanding the nature of pain at least partly depends on recognizing its inherent first person epistemology and on using a first person experiential and third person experimental approach to study it. This approach may help to understand some of the neural mechanisms of pain and consciousness by integrating experiential–phenomenological methods with those of neuroscience. Examples that approximate this strategy include studies of second pain summation and its relationship to neural activities and brain imaging-psychophysical studies wherein sensory and affective (...)
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  41.  15
    Jonathan Cole & Barbara Montero (2007). Affective Proprioception. Janus Head 9 (2):299-317.
    Proprioception has been considered, within neuroscience, in the context of the control of movement. Here we discuss a possible second role for this ‘sixth sense’, pleasure in and of movement, homologous with the recently described affective touch. We speculate on its evolution and place in human society and suggest that pleasure in movement may depend not on feedback but also on harmony between intention and action. Examples come from expert movers, dancers and sportsmen, and from those without proprioception (...)
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  42.  19
    D. Barrell Price & Rainville J. (2002). Integrating Experimental-Phenomenological Methods and Neuroscience to Study Neural Mechanisms of Pain and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):593-608.
    Understanding the nature of pain at least partly depends on recognizing its inherent first person epistemology and on using a first person experiential and third person experimental approach to study it. This approach may help to understand some of the neural mechanisms of pain and consciousness by integrating experiential–phenomenological methods with those of neuroscience. Examples that approximate this strategy include studies of second pain summation and its relationship to neural activities and brain imaging-psychophysical studies wherein sensory and affective (...)
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  43.  10
    Gemma Corradi Fiumara (2001). The Mind's Affective Life: A Psychoanalytic and Philosophical Inquiry. Brunner-Routledge.
    The Mind's Affective Life is a refreshing and innovative examination of the relationship between feeling and thinking. Our thoughts and behavior are shaped by both our emotions and reason; yet until recently most of the literature analyzing thought has concentrated largely on philosophical reasoning and neglected emotions. This book is an original and provocative contribution to the rapidly growing literature on the neglected "affective" dimensions of modern thought. The author draws on contemporary psychoanalysis, philosophy, feminist theory, and recent (...)
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  44.  9
    Cindy Hamon-Hill & Simon Gadbois (2013). From the Bottom Up: The Roots of Social Neuroscience at Risk of Running Dry? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):426-427.
    A second-person neuroscience, as an emerging area of neuroscience and the behavioral sciences, cannot afford to avoid a bottom-up, subcortical, and conative-affective perspective. An example with canid social play and a modern motivational behavioral neursocience will illustrate our point.
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  45.  7
    R. J. R. Blair (2011). Should Affective Arousal Be Grounded in Perception-Action Coupling? Emotion Review 3 (1):109-110.
    Decety (2011) considers the cognitive neuroscience of empathy and, in particular, his three-component model of empathic responding. His position is highly influential with its emotional awareness/understanding and emotional regulation components representing clear extensions of previous theorizing on empathy. In this brief commentary, I will critically consider the third of his components: affective arousal. In particular, I will consider the implications of the literature to the proposed computations, based on perception—action coupling, that underlie this component of his model. I (...)
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  46.  8
    Klaus R. Scherer, Tanja Bnziger & Etienne Roesch (eds.) (2010). A Blueprint for Affective Computing: A Sourcebook and Manual. OUP Oxford.
    'Affective computing' is a branch of computing concerned with the theory and construction of machines which can detect, respond to, and simulate human emotional states. This book presents an interdisciplinary exploration of this rapidly expanding field, aimed at those in psychology, computational neuroscience, computer science, and AI.
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  47.  6
    Paul J. Whalen, Hannah Raila, Randi Bennett, Alison Mattek, Annemarie Brown, James Taylor, Michelle van Tieghem, Alexandra Tanner, Matthew Miner & Amy Palmer (2013). Neuroscience and Facial Expressions of Emotion: The Role of Amygdala–Prefrontal Interactions. Emotion Review 5 (1):78-83.
    The aim of this review is to show the fruitfulness of using images of facial expressions as experimental stimuli in order to study how neural systems support biologically relevant learning as it relates to social interactions. Here we consider facial expressions as naturally conditioned stimuli which, when presented in experimental paradigms, evoke activation in amygdala–prefrontal neural circuits that serve to decipher the predictive meaning of the expressions. Facial expressions offer a relatively innocuous strategy with which to investigate these normal variations (...)
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  48.  40
    Henrik Walter (2012). Social Cognitive Neuroscience of Empathy: Concepts, Circuits, and Genes. Emotion Review 4 (1):9-17.
    This article reviews concepts of, as well as neurocognitive and genetic studies on, empathy. Whereas cognitive empathy can be equated with affective theory of mind, that is, with mentalizing the emotions of others, affective empathy is about sharing emotions with others. The neural circuits underlying different forms of empathy do overlap but also involve rather specific brain areas for cognitive (ventromedial prefrontal cortex) and affective (anterior insula, midcingulate cortex, and possibly inferior frontal gyrus) empathy. Furthermore, behavioral and (...)
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  49.  50
    Arthur M. Jacobs (2012). Comment on Walter's “Social Cognitive Neuroscience of Empathy: Concepts, Circuits, and Genes”. Emotion Review 4 (1):20-21.
    In his review, Walter (2012) links conceptual perspectives on empathy with crucial results of neurocognitive and genetic studies and presents a descriptive neurocognitive model that identifies neuronal key structures and links them with both cognitive and affective empathy via a high and a low road. After discussion of this model, the remainder of this comment deals more generally with the possibilities and limitations of current neurocognitive models, considering ways to develop process models allowing specific quantitative predictions.
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  50.  52
    Silke Anders, Niels Birbaumer, Bettina Sadowski, Michael Erb, Irina Mader, Wolfgang Grodd & Martin Lotze (2004). Parietal Somatosensory Association Cortex Mediates Affective Blindsight. Nature Neuroscience 7 (4):339-340.
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