Search results for 'Affective neuroscience' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Pereira A. Almada Lf (2013). What Affective Neuroscience Means for Science of Consciousness. Mens Sana Monographs 11 (1):253.score: 240.0
    The field of affective neuroscience has emerged from the efforts of Jaak Panksepp in the 1990s and reinforced by the work of, among others, Joseph LeDoux in the 2000s. It is based on the ideas that affective processes are supported by brain structures that appeared earlier in the phylogenetic scale (as the periaqueductal gray area), they run in parallel with cognitive processes, and can influence behaviour independently of cognitive judgements. This kind of approach contrasts with the hegemonic (...)
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  2. Stephen Asma, Jaak Panksepp, Rami Gabriel & Glennon Curran (2012). Philosophical Implications of Affective Neuroscience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (3-4):6-48.score: 240.0
    These papers are based on a Symposium at the COGSCI Conference in 2010. 1. Naturalizing the Mammalian Mind (Jaak Panksepp) 2. Modularity in Cognitive Psychology and Affective Neuroscience (Rami Gabriel) 3. Affective Neuroscience and the Philosophy of Self (Stephen Asma and Tom Greif) 4. Affective Neuroscience and Law (Glennon Curran and Rami Gabriel).
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  3. Leonardo Ferreira Almada, Alfredo Pereira Jr & Claudia Carrara-Augustenborg (2013). What Affective Neuroscience Means for Science of Consciousness. Mens Sana Monographs 11 (1):253.score: 240.0
    The field of affective neuroscience has emerged from the efforts of Jaak Panksepp in the 1990s and reinforced by the work of, among others, Joseph LeDoux in the 2000s. It is based on the ideas that affective processes are supported by brain structures that appeared earlier in the phylogenetic scale (as the periaqueductal gray area), they run in parallel with cognitive processes, and can influence behaviour independently of cognitive judgements. This kind of approach contrasts with the hegemonic (...)
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  4. H. M. Ravven (2003). Spinoza’s Anticipation of Contemporary Affective Neuroscience. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):257-290.score: 180.0
    Spinoza speculated on how ethics could emerge from biology and psychology rather than disrupt them and recent evidence suggests he might have gotten it right. His radical deconstruction and reconstruction of ethics is supported by a number of avenues of research in the cognitive and neurosciences. This paper gathers together and presents a composite picture of recent research that supports Spinoza’s theory of the emotions and of the natural origins of ethics. It enumerates twelve naturalist claims of Spinoza that now (...)
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  5. G. Colombetti (2013). Some Ideas for the Integration of Neurophenomenology and Affective Neuroscience. Constructivist Foundations 8 (3):288-297.score: 180.0
    Context: Affective neuroscience has not developed first-person methods for the generation of first-person data. This neglect is problematic, because emotion experience is a central dimension of affectivity. Problem: I propose that augmenting affective neuroscience with a neurophenomenological method can help address long-standing questions in emotion theory, such as: Do different emotions come with unique, distinctive patterns of brain and bodily activity? How do emotion experience, bodily feelings and brain and bodily activity relate to one another? Method: (...)
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  6. Tim Dalgleish, Barnaby D. Dunn & Dean Mobbs (2009). Affective Neuroscience: Past, Present, and Future. Emotion Review 1 (4):355-368.score: 180.0
    The discipline of affective neuroscience is concerned with the underlying neural substrates of emotion and mood. This review presents an historical overview of the pioneering work in affective neuroscience of James and Lange, Cannon and Bard, and Hess, Papez, and MacLean before summarizing the current state of research on the brain regions identified by these seminal researchers. We also discuss the more recent strides made in the field of affective neuroscience. A final section considers (...)
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  7. Jaak Panksepp & Douglas Watt (2011). What is Basic About Basic Emotions? Lasting Lessons From Affective Neuroscience. Emotion Review 3 (4):387-396.score: 180.0
    A cross-species affective neuroscience strategy for understanding the primary-process (basic) emotions is defended. The need for analyzing the brain and mind in terms of evolutionary stratification of functions into at least primary (instinctual), secondary (learned), and tertiary (thought-related) processes is advanced. When viewed in this context, the contentious battles between basic-emotion theorists and dimensional-constructivist approaches can be seen to be largely nonsubstantial differences among investigators working at different levels of analysis.
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  8. Louis C. Charland (2007). Affective Neuroscience and Addiction. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):20 – 21.score: 160.0
    The author comments on the article “The neurobiology of addiction: Implications for voluntary control of behavior,‘ by S. E. Hyman. Hyman suggests that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The author states that brain and neurochemical systems are involved in addiction. He also suggests that neuroscience can link the diseased brain processes in addiction to the moral struggles of the addicts. Accession Number: 24077919; Authors: Charland, Louis C. 1; Email Address: charland@uwo.ca; Affiliations: 1: University of (...)
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  9. Allan N. Schore (2005). Developmental Affective Neuroscience Describes Mechanisms at the Core of Dynamic Systems Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):217-218.score: 156.0
    Lewis describes the developmental core of dynamic systems theory. I offer recent data from developmental neuroscience on the sequential experience-dependent maturation of components of the limbic system over the stages of infancy. Increasing interconnectivity within the vertically integrated limbic system allows for more complex appraisals of emotional value. The earliest organization of limbic structures has an enduring impact on all later emotional processing.
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  10. Dan J. Stein, Mark Solms & Jack van Honk (2006). The Cognitive-Affective Neuroscience of the Unconscious. CNS Spectrums 11 (8):580-583.score: 154.0
  11. R. Ellis (2000). Review of “Affective Neuroscience” by Jaak Panksepp. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Emotion 1 (2):313-318.score: 150.0
  12. Paul Thagard (2007). The Moral Psychology of Conflicts of Interest: Insights From Affective Neuroscience. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (4):367–380.score: 150.0
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  13. Stephen T. Asma (2012). Affective Neuroscience and the Philosophy of Self. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19.score: 150.0
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  14. D. Watt (2005). Panksepp?S Common Sense View of Affective Neuroscience is Not the Commonsense View in Large Areas of Neuroscience. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):81-88.score: 150.0
  15. Andrew Tallon (2009). Levinas's Ethical Horizon, Affective Neuroscience, and Social Field Theory. Levinas Studies 4:47-67.score: 150.0
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  16. Douglas F. Watt (1999). At the Intersection of Emotion and Consciousness: Affective Neuroscience and Extended Reticular Thalamic Activating System (ERTAS) Theories of Consciousness. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & David J. Chalmers (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness Iii. Mit Press. 215--229.score: 150.0
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  17. Richard J. Davidson (1998). Affective Style and Affective Disorders: Perspectives From Affective Neuroscience. Cognition and Emotion 12 (3):307-330.score: 150.0
  18. R. Ellis (2000). Jaak Panksepp: Affective Neuroscience. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (2):313-317.score: 150.0
  19. Jaak Panksepp (2007). Affective Neuroscience and the Ancestral Sources of Human Feelings. In Henri Cohen & Brigitte Stemmer (eds.), Consciousness and Cognition: Fragments of Mind and Brain. Elxevier Academic Press.score: 150.0
     
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  20. Edmund T. Rolls (2007). The Affective Neuroscience of Consciousness: Higher Order Syntactic Thoughts, Dual Routes to Emotion and Action, and Consciousness. In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge.score: 150.0
  21. Chandra Sripada, John D. Swain, S. Shaun Ho & James E. Swain (2014). Automatic Goals and Conscious Regulation in Social Cognitive Affective Neuroscience. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):156-157.score: 150.0
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  22. D. F. Watt (1999). At the Intersection of Emotion and Consciousness: Review of Panksepp, Affective Neuroscience. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (6/7).score: 150.0
     
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  23. Mary Helen Immordino-Yang (2011). Implications of Affective and Social Neuroscience for Educational Theory. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):98-103.score: 144.0
    The past decade has seen major advances in cognitive, affective and social neuroscience that have the potential to revolutionize educational theories about learning. The importance of emotion and social learning has long been recognized in education, but due to technological limitations in neuroscience research techniques, treatment of these topics in educational theory has largely not had the benefit of biological evidence to date. In this article, I lay out two general, complementary findings that have emerged from the (...)
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  24. Richard D. R. Lane, L. Nadel & G. L. Ahern (eds.) (2000). Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotion. Series in Affective Science. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
  25. P. Vrtička & P. Vuilleumier (2011). Neuroscience of Human Social Interactions and Adult Attachment Style. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:212-212.score: 102.0
    Since its first description four decades ago, attachment theory has become one of the principal developmental psychological frameworks for describing the role of individual differences in the establishment and maintenance of social bonds between people. Yet, still little is known about the neurobiological underpinnings of attachment orientations and their well-established impact on a range of social and affective behaviors. In the present review, we summarize data from recent studies using cognitive and imaging approaches to characterize attachment styles and their (...)
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  26. Robin Mackenzie (2011). How the Politics of Inclusion/Exclusion and the Neuroscience of Dehumanization/Rehumanization Can Contribute to Animal Activists' Strategies: Bestia Sacer II. Society and Animals 19 (4):407-424.score: 90.0
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  27. Kathryn E. Patten (2011). The Somatic Appraisal Model of Affect: Paradigm for Educational Neuroscience and Neuropedagogy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):87-97.score: 80.0
    This chapter presents emotion as a function of brain-body interaction, as a vital part of a multi-tiered phylogenetic set of neural mechanisms, evoked by both instinctive processes and learned appraisal systems, and argues to establish the primacy of emotion in relation to cognition. Primarily based on Damasio's somatic marker hypothesis, but also incorporating elements of Lazarus' appraisal theory, this paper presents a neuropedagogical model of emotion, the somatic appraisal model of affect (SAMA). SAMA identifies quintessential components, facets, and functions of (...)
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  28. Patrick David Schelenz, Martin Klasen, Barbara Reese, Christina Regenbogen, Dhana Wolf, Yutaka Kato & Klaus Mathiak (2013). Multisensory Integration of Dynamic Emotional Faces and Voices: Method for Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Measurements. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 68.0
    Combined EEG-fMRI analysis correlates time courses from single electrodes or independent EEG components with the hemodynamic response. Implementing information from only one electrode, however, may miss relevant information from complex electrophysiological networks. Component based analysis, in turn, depends on a priori knowledge of the signal topography. Complex designs such as studies on multisensory integration of emotions investigate subtle differences in distributed networks based on only a few trials per condition. Thus, they require a sensitive and comprehensive approach which does not (...)
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  29. Jan Slaby (2010). Steps Towards a Critical Neuroscience. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):397-416.score: 66.0
    This paper introduces the motivation and idea behind the recently founded interdisciplinary initiative Critical Neuroscience ( http://www.critical-neuroscience.org ). Critical Neuroscience is an approach that strives to understand, explain, contextualize, and, where called for, critique developments in and around the social, affective, and cognitive neurosciences with the aim to create the competencies needed to responsibly deal with new challenges and concerns emerging in relation to the brain sciences. It addresses scholars in the humanities as well as, importantly, (...)
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  30. Christine D. Wilson-Mendenhall, Lisa Feldman Barrett & Lawrence W. Barsalou (2013). Situating Emotional Experience. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
  31. Pierre Philippot Alexandre Heeren, Rudi De Raedt, Ernst H. W. Koster (2013). The (Neuro)Cognitive Mechanisms Behind Attention Bias Modification in Anxiety: Proposals Based on Theoretical Accounts of Attentional Bias. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    Recently, researchers have investigated the causal nature of attentional bias for threat (AB) in the maintenance of anxiety disorders by experimentally manipulating it. They found that training anxious individuals to attend to nonthreat stimuli reduces AB, which, in turn, reduces anxiety. This effect supports the hypothesis that AB can causally impact the maintenance of anxiety. At a fundamental level, however, uncertainty still abounds regarding the nature of the processes that mediate this effect. In the present paper, we propose that two (...)
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  32. José H. Kerstholt Jos J. A. Van Berkum, Dieuwke De Goede, Petra M. Van Alphen, Emma R. Mulder (2013). How Robust is the Language Architecture? The Case of Mood. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 66.0
    In neurocognitive research on language, the processing principles of the system at hand are usually assumed to be relatively invariant. However, research on attention, memory, decision-making, and social judgment has shown that mood can substantially modulate how the brain processes information. For example, in a bad mood, people typically have a narrower focus of attention and rely less on heuristics. In the face of such pervasive mood effects elsewhere in the brain, it seems unlikely that language processing would remain untouched. (...)
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  33. Mog Stapleton (2013). Steps to a "Properly Embodied" Cognitive Science. Cognitive Systems Research 22 (June):1-11.score: 62.0
    Cognitive systems research has predominantly been guided by the historical distinction between emotion and cognition, and has focused its efforts on modelling the “cognitive” aspects of behaviour. While this initially meant modelling only the control system of cognitive creatures, with the advent of “embodied” cognitive science this expanded to also modelling the interactions between the control system and the external environment. What did not seem to change with this embodiment revolution, however, was the attitude towards affect and emotion in cognitive (...)
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  34. Peter Railton (forthcoming). The Affective Dog and its Rational Tale. Ethics.score: 60.0
    Intuition—spontaneous, nondeliberative assessment—has long been indispensable in theoretical and practical philosophy alike. Recent research by psychologists and experimental philosophers has challenged our understanding of the nature and authority of moral intuitions by tracing them to “fast,” “automatic,” “button-pushing” responses of the affective system. This view of the affective system contrasts with a growing body of research in affective neuroscience which suggests that it is instead a flexible learning system that generates and updates a multidimensional evaluative landscape (...)
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  35. Christian Coseru (2014). Buddhism, Comparative Neurophilosophy, and Human Flourishing. Zygon 49 (1):208-219.score: 60.0
    Owen Flanagan's The Bodhisattva's Brain represents an ambitious foray into cross-cultural neurophilosophy, making a compelling, though not entirely unproblematic, case for naturalizing Buddhist philosophy. While the naturalist account of mental causation challenges certain Buddhist views about the mind, the Buddhist analysis of mind and mental phenomena is far more complex than the book suggests. Flanagan is right to criticize the Buddhist claim that there could be mental states that are not reducible to their neural correlates; however, when the mental states (...)
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  36. Fabian Guénolé, Geoffrey Marcaggi & Jean-Marc Baleyte (2013). Do Dreams Really Guard Sleep? Evidence for and Against Freud's Theory of the Basic Function of Dreaming. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 60.0
    Do dreams really guard sleep? Evidence for and against Freud's theory of the basic function of dreaming.
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  37. George F. R. Ellis Judith A. Toronchuk (2012). Affective Neuronal Selection: The Nature of the Primordial Emotion Systems. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 60.0
    Based on studies in affective neuroscience and evolutionary psychiatry, a tentative new proposal is made here as to the nature and identification of primordial emotional systems. Our model stresses phylogenetic origins of emotional systems, which we believe is necessary for a full understanding of the functions of emotions and additionally suggests that emotional organising systems play a role in sculpting the brain during ontogeny. Nascent emotional systems thus affect cognitive development. A second proposal concerns two additions to the (...)
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  38. Matthew D. Lieberman Meghan L. Meyer (2012). Social Working Memory: Neurocognitive Networks and Directions for Future Research. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 60.0
    Navigating the social world requires the ability to maintain and manipulate information about people’s beliefs, traits, and mental states. We characterize this capacity as social working memory. To date, very little research has explored this phenomenon, in part because of the assumption that general working memory systems would support working memory for social information. Various lines of research, however, suggest that social cognitive processing relies on a neurocognitive network (i.e., the ‘mentalizing network’) that is functionally distinct from, and considered antagonistic (...)
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  39. Klaus R. Scherer, Tanja Bänziger & Etienne Roesch (eds.) (2010). A Blueprint for Affective Computing: A Sourcebook and Manual. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    'Affective computing' is a branch of computing concerned with the theory and construction of machines which can detect, respond to, and simulate human emotional states. It is an interdisciplinary field spanning the computer sciences, psychology, and cognitive science. Affective computing is a rapidly developing field within industry and science. There is now a great drive to make technologies such as robotic systems, avatars in service-related human computer interaction, e-learning, game characters, or companion devices more marketable by endowing the (...)
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  40. B. Gelder (2009). The Grand Challenge for Frontiers in Emotion Science. Frontiers in Psychology 1:187-187.score: 60.0
    The Grand Challenge for Frontiers in Emotion Science.
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  41. Jean Decety, Kalina J. Michalska & Katherine D. Kinzler (2011). The Developmental Neuroscience of Moral Sensitivity. Emotion Review 3 (3):305-307.score: 60.0
    Though traditional accounts of moral development focus on the development of rational and deliberate thinking, recent work in developmental affective neuroscience suggests that moral cognition is tightly related to affective and emotional processing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies show age-related changes in response to empathy-eliciting stimuli, with a gradual shift from the monitoring of somatovisceral responses in young children mediated by the amygdala, insula and medial aspect of the orbitofrontal cortex, to the executive control and evaluation of (...)
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  42. Silvio Ionta Ilaria Bufalari (2013). The Social and Personality Neuroscience of Empathy for Pain and Touch. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 60.0
    First- and third-person experiences of bodily sensations, like pain and touch, recruit overlapping neural networks including sensorimotor, insular, and anterior cingulate cortices. Here we illustrate the peculiar role of these structures in coding the sensory and affective qualities of the observed bodily sensations. Subsequently we show that such neural activity is critically influenced by a range of social, emotional, cognitive factors, and importantly by inter-individual differences in the separate components of empathic traits. Finally we suggest some fundamental issues that (...)
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  43. Andrea Scarantino (2009). Core Affect and Natural Affective Kinds. Philosophy of Science 76 (5):940-957.score: 54.0
    It is commonly assumed that the scientific study of emotions should focus on discrete categories such as fear, anger, sadness, joy, disgust, shame, guilt, and so on. This view has recently been questioned by the emergence of the “core affect movement,” according to which discrete emotions are not natural kinds. Affective science, it is argued, should focus on core affect, a blend of hedonic and arousal values. Here, I argue that the empirical evidence does not support the thesis that (...)
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  44. G. R. Semin & Eliot R. Smith (eds.) (2008). Embodied Grounding: Social, Cognitive, Affective, and Neuroscientific Approaches. Cambridge University Press.score: 54.0
    In recent years there has been an increasing awareness that a comprehensive understanding of language, cognitive and affective processes, and social and interpersonal phenomena cannot be achieved without understanding the ways these processes are grounded in bodily states. The term ‘embodiment’ captures the common denominator of these developments, which come from several disciplinary perspectives ranging from neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology, and affective sciences. For the first time, this volume brings together these varied developments under one umbrella (...)
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  45. Richard D. R. Lane, L. Nadel, G. L. Ahern, J. Allen & Alfred W. Kaszniak (eds.) (2000). Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotion. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    This book, a member of the Series in Affective Science, is a unique interdisciplinary sequence of articles on the cognitive neuroscience of emotion by some of ...
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  46. Gemma Corradi Fiumara (2001). The Mind's Affective Life: A Psychoanalytic and Philosophical Inquiry. Brunner-Routledge.score: 54.0
    The Mind's Affective Life is a refreshing and innovative examination of the relationship between feeling and thinking. Our thoughts and behavior are shaped by both our emotions and reason; yet until recently most of the literature analyzing thought has concentrated largely on philosophical reasoning and neglected emotions. This book is an original and provocative contribution to the rapidly growing literature on the neglected "affective" dimensions of modern thought. The author draws on contemporary psychoanalysis, philosophy, feminist theory, and recent (...)
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  47. Jean Decety, Chenyi Chen, Carla Harenski & Kent A. Kiehl (2013). An fMRI Study of Affective Perspective Taking in Individuals with Psychopathy: Imagining Another in Pain Does Not Evoke Empathy. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 54.0
    While it is well established that individuals with psychopathy have a marked deficit in affective arousal, emotional empathy, and caring for the well-being of others, the extent to which perspective taking can elicit an emotional response has not yet been studied despite its potential application in rehabilitation. In healthy individuals, affective perspective taking has proven to be an effective means to elicit empathy and concern for others. To examine neural responses in individuals who vary in psychopathy during (...) perspective taking, 121 incarcerated males, classified as high (n = 37; Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised, PCL-R ≥ 30), intermediate (n = 44; PCL-R between 21-29), and low (n = 40; PCL-R ≤ 20) psychopaths, were scanned while viewing stimuli depicting bodily injuries and adopting an imagine-self and an imagine-other perspective. During the imagine-self perspective, participants with high psychopathy showed a typical response within the network involved in empathy for pain, including the anterior insula, anterior midcingulate cortex, supplementary motor area, inferior frontal gyrus, somatosensory cortex, and right amygdala. Conversely, during the imagine-other perspective, psychopaths exhibited an atypical pattern of brain activation and effective connectivity seeded in the anterior insula and amygdala with the orbitofrontal cortex and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. The response in the amygdala and insula was inversely correlated with PCL-R factor 1 (interpersonal/affective) during the imagine-other perspective. In high psychopaths, scores on PCL-R Factor 1 predicted the neural response in ventral striatum when imagining others in pain. These patterns of brain activation and effective connectivity associated with differential perspective-taking provide a better understanding of empathy dysfunction in psychopathy, and have the potential to inform intervention programs for this complex clinical problem. (shrink)
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  48. Kai Vogeley Bojana Kuzmanovic, Anneli Jefferson, Gary Bente (2013). Affective and Motivational Influences in Person Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 54.0
    Interpersonal impression formation is highly consequential for social interactions in private and public domains. These perceptions of others rely on different sources of information and processing mechanisms, all of which have been investigated in independent research fields. In social psychology, inferences about states and traits of others as well as activations of semantic categories and corresponding stereotypes have attracted great interest. On the other hand, research on emotion and reward demonstrated affective and motivational influences of social cues on the (...)
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  49. R. J. R. Blair (2011). Should Affective Arousal Be Grounded in Perception-Action Coupling? Emotion Review 3 (1):109-110.score: 54.0
    Decety (2011) considers the cognitive neuroscience of empathy and, in particular, his three-component model of empathic responding. His position is highly influential with its emotional awareness/understanding and emotional regulation components representing clear extensions of previous theorizing on empathy. In this brief commentary, I will critically consider the third of his components: affective arousal. In particular, I will consider the implications of the literature to the proposed computations, based on perception—action coupling, that underlie this component of his model. I (...)
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  50. Cindy Hamon-Hill & Simon Gadbois (2013). From the Bottom Up: The Roots of Social Neuroscience at Risk of Running Dry? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):426-427.score: 54.0
    A second-person neuroscience, as an emerging area of neuroscience and the behavioral sciences, cannot afford to avoid a bottom-up, subcortical, and conative-affective perspective. An example with canid social play and a modern motivational behavioral neursocience will illustrate our point.
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