Search results for 'Affectivity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Giovanna Colombetti & Tom Roberts (2015). Extending the Extended Mind: The Case for Extended Affectivity. Philosophical Studies 172 (5):1243-1263.
    The thesis of the extended mind (ExM) holds that the material underpinnings of an individual’s mental states and processes need not be restricted to those contained within biological boundaries: when conditions are right, material artefacts can be incorporated by the thinking subject in such a way as to become a component of her extended mind. Up to this point, the focus of this approach has been on phenomena of a distinctively cognitive nature, such as states of dispositional belief, and processes (...)
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  2. Lauren Freeman & Andreas Elpidorou (2015). Affectivity in Heidegger II: Temporality, Boredom, and Beyond. Philosophy Compass 10 (10):672-684.
    In ‘Affectivity in Heidegger I: Moods and Emotions in Being and Time’, we explicated the crucial role that Martin Heidegger assigns to our capacity to affectively find ourselves in the world. There, our discussion was restricted to Division I of Being and Time. Specifically, we discussed how Befindlichkeit as a basic existential and moods as the ontic counterparts of Befindlichkeit make circumspective engagement with the world possible. Indeed, according to Heidegger, it is primarily through moods that the world is (...)
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  3. Andreas Elpidorou & Lauren Freeman (2015). Affectivity in Heidegger I: Moods and Emotions in Being and Time. Philosophy Compass 10 (10):661-671.
    This essay provides an analysis of the role of affectivity in Martin Heidegger's writings from the mid to late 1920s. We begin by situating his account of mood within the context of his project of fundamental ontology in Being and Time. We then discuss the role of Befindlichkeit and Stimmung in his account of human existence, explicate the relationship between the former and the latter, and consider the ways in which the former discloses the world. To give a more (...)
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  4.  23
    Joel Krueger & Mads Gram Henriksen (forthcoming). Embodiment and Affectivity in Moebius Syndrome and Schizophrenia: A Phenomenological Analysis. In J. Aaron Simmons & James Hackett (eds.), Phenomenology for the 21st Century. Palgrave Macmillan
    In this comparative study, we examine experiential disruptions of embodiment and affectivity in Moebius Syndrome and schizophrenia. We suggest that using phenomenological resources to explore these experiences may help us better understand what it’s like to live with these conditions, and that such an understanding may have significant therapeutic value. Additionally, we suggest that this sort of phenomenologically-informed comparative analysis can shed light on the importance of embodiment and affectivity for the constitution of a sense of self and (...)
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  5. Elizabeth A. Behnke (2008). Interkinaesthetic Affectivity: A Phenomenological Approach. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (2):143-161.
    This Husserlian transcendental-phenomenological investigation of interkinaesthetic affectivity first clarifies the sense of affectivity that is at stake here, then shows how Husserl’s distinctive approach to kinaesthetic experience provides evidential access to the interkinaesthetic field. After describing several structures of interkinaesthetic-affective experience, I indicate how a Husserlian critique of the presupposition that we are “psychophysical” entities might suggest a more inclusive approach to a biosocial plenum that includes all metabolic life.
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  6.  8
    Qingguo Zhai, Margaret Lindorff & Brian Cooper (2013). Workplace Guanxi: Its Dispositional Antecedents and Mediating Role in the Affectivity–Job Satisfaction Relationship. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):541-551.
    This paper examines dispositional sources of workplace guanxi and the mediating role of workplace guanxi on the affectivity and job satisfaction relationship. Data were collected from 808 respondents in multiple industries in a city in China’s northeast. The study found that both positive affectivity and negative affectivity have an effect on supervisor–subordinate guanxi and co-worker guanxi, which supports the proposition that workplace guanxi has a dispositional source. Supervisor–subordinate guanxi has a positive relationship with job satisfaction, although co-worker (...)
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  7.  19
    Giovanna Colombetti (forthcoming). Enactive Affectivity, Extended. Topoi:1-11.
    In this paper I advance an enactive view of affectivity that does not imply that affectivity must stop at the boundaries of the organism. I first review the enactive notion of “sense-making”, and argue that it entails that cognition is inherently affective. Then I review the proposal, advanced by Di Paolo, that the enactive approach allows living systems to “extend”. Drawing out the implications of this proposal, I argue that, if enactivism allows living systems to extend, then it (...)
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  8.  60
    Philippe Cabestan (2004). What is It to Move Oneself Emotionally? Emotion and Affectivity According to Jean-Paul Sartre. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (1):81-96.
    Emotion is traditionally described as a phenomenon that dominates the subject because one does not choose to be angry, sad, or happy. However, would it be totally absurd to conceive emotion as behaviour and a manifestation of the spontaneity and liberty of consciousness? In his short text, Esquisse d''une theorie des émotions, Sartre proposes a phenomenological description of this psychological phenomenon. He distinguishes between constituted affectivity, which gives rise to emotions, and an original affectivity lacking intentionality, and tied (...)
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  9.  64
    Michael Stocker (2002). Some Problems About Affectivity. Philosophical Studies 108 (1-2):151-158.
    Neu's work is splendid. In addition to offering wonderfully illuminating characterizations of various emotions, it helps show that these individual characterizations, rather than an overall characterization of emotions or affectivity, have always been Neu's main concern. Nonetheless he is concerned with specific instances of, and often the general nature of, affectivity: what differentiates mere thoughts, desires, and values from emotions where the complex is affectively charged. I argue that his accounts of affectivity do not succeed — in (...)
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  10.  28
    Brian Harding (2012). Auto-Affectivity and Michel Henry's Material Phenomenology. Philosophical Forum 43 (1):91-100.
    This paper provides an introduction and overview of Michel Henry's work, with particular emphasis on his understanding of auto-affectivity. It concludes by pointing to some objections or questions sympathetic phenomenologists may have for his work.
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  11.  52
    Robert C. Solomon (2003). Emotions, Thoughts, and Feelings: What is a Cognitive Theory of the Emotions and Does It Neglect Affectivity? In A. Hatimoysis (ed.), Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement. Cambridge University Press 1-18.
    I have been arguing, for almost thirty years now, that emotions have been unduly neglected in philosophy. Back in the seventies, it was an argument that attracted little sympathy. I have also been arguing that emotions are a ripe for philosophical analysis, a view that, as evidenced by the Manchester 2001 conference and a large number of excellent publications, has now become mainstream. My own analysis of emotion, first published in 1973, challenged the sharp divide between emotions and rationality, insisted (...)
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  12.  17
    Louis A. Sass (2004). Affectivity in Schizophrenia: A Phenomenological View. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (10-11):127-147.
    Schizophrenia involves profound but enigmatic disturbances of affective or emotional life. The affective responses as well as expression of many patients in the schizophrenia spectrum can seem odd, incongruent, inadequate, or otherwise off-the-mark. Such patients are, in fact, often described in rather contradictory terms: as being prone both to exaggerated and to diminished levels of emotional or affective response. According to Ernst Kretschmer, they actually tend to have both kinds of experience at the same time. This paper attempts to explain (...)
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  13.  6
    Michelle Maiese (forthcoming). Transformative Learning, Enactivism, and Affectivity. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-20.
    Education theorists have emphasized that transformative learning is not simply a matter of students gaining access to new knowledge and information, but instead centers upon personal transformation: it alters students’ perspectives, interpretations, and responses. How should learning that brings about this sort of self-transformation be understood from the perspectives of philosophy of mind and cognitive science? Jack Mezirow has described transformative learning primarily in terms of critical reflection, meta-cognitive reasoning, and the questioning of assumptions and beliefs. And within mainstream philosophy (...)
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  14.  8
    Mikko Salmela (2002). Intentionality and Feeling. A Sketch for a Two-Level Account of Emotional Affectivity. Philosophia 3 (1):56-75.
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  15.  3
    Howard L. Beams (1954). Affectivity as a Factor in the Apparent Size of Pictured Food Objects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (3):197.
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  16.  57
    Laszlo Tengelyi (2009). Selfhood, Passivity and Affectivity in Henry and Lévinas. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (3):401 - 414.
    When we compare Henry and Levinas, we stumble upon a difficulty. Henry tries to reduce transcendence to immanence; Levinas, on the contrary, strives to call immance into question and to lend a new dignity to transcendence. Hence, the two thinkers seem to be diametrically opposed to one another. Yet, if one does not limit oneself to such an overall view, one finds some similarities between them. There is an affinity between the two approaches which results from the fact that both (...)
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  17.  54
    Jason Del Gandio (2012). From Affectivity to Bodily Emanation: An Introduction to the Human Vibe. Phaenex 7 (2):28-58.
    This essay investigates a particular form of “affection” that has been neglected by the phenomenological tradition. This particular phenomenon is often referred to as the vibe, vibrations, or some variation thereof. This essay rearticulates “the vibe” as bodily emanation: human beings emanate feeling that is experienced by and through our bodies. My study of bodily emanation begins with Edmund Husserl’s notion of affectivity and then moves to Eugene T. Gendlin’s notion of the sentient body. This discussion enables my own (...)
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  18.  60
    Renaud Barbaras (2004). Affectivity and Movement: The Sense of Sensing in Erwin Straus. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):215-228.
    This paper explores the notion of sensing (Empfinden) as developed by Erwin Straus. It argues that the notion of sensing is at the center of Strauss's thought about animal and human experience. Straus's originality consists in approaching sensory experience from an existential point of view. Sensing is not a mode of knowing. Sensing is distinguished from perceiving but is still a mode of relation to exteriority, and is situated on the side of what is usually called affectivity. At the (...)
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  19.  52
    Béatrice Han-Pile, Affectivity in Existentialist Philosophy.
    Since fully covering such a topic in the short space imparted to this paper is an impossible task, I have chosen to focus on three philosophers: Nietzsche, Heidegger and Sartre. Of the three, only the latter was undoubtedly an existentialist ⎯ Heidegger explicitly rejected the categorisation (in the Letter on Humanism), and there is disagreement among commentators about Nietzsche’s status1. However, they have two major common points which justify my focusing on them: firstly, they uphold the primacy of existence over (...)
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  20.  1
    Anna Bortolan (forthcoming). Affectivity and Moral Experience: An Extended Phenomenological Account. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-20.
    The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between affectivity and moral experience from a phenomenological perspective. I will start by showing how in a phenomenologically oriented account emotions can be conceived as intentional evaluative feelings which play a role in both moral epistemology and the motivation of moral behaviour. I will then move to discuss a particular kind of affect, “existential feelings”, 43–60, 2005, 2008), which has not been considered so far in the discourse on moral (...)
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  21.  7
    P. Valiaho (2012). Affectivity, Biopolitics and the Virtual Reality of War. Theory, Culture and Society 29 (2):63-83.
    At the focal point of contemporary biopolitical knowledge and power is human life in its contingent, evolutionary and emergent properties: the living as adaptive and affective beings, characterized in particular by their capacity to experience stress and fear that works together with vital survival mechanisms. This article addresses new techniques of psychiatric power and therapeutic epistemologies that have emerged in present-day military-scientific as well as media technological assemblages to define and capture the human in its psychobiological states of emergency. Specifically, (...)
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  22. Lee Rice (1999). Action in Spinoza's Account of Affectivity. In Yirmiyahu Yovel (ed.). Little Room Press 155--168.
    Despite the considerable attention given to Spinoza’s account of affectivity, especially in recent years, scant attention has been paid to the distinction between action and passion, or to the problems which it presents internally and externally. This essay offers a clarification and defense of Spinoza’s account of action and passion. A second theme is the behavioristic nature of Spinoza’s account of human affectivity. Despite the bad press which behaviorism is receiving these days, I argue that the behavioristic aspects (...)
     
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  23.  2
    Jason Del Gandio (2012). From Affectivity to Bodily Emanation: An Introduction to the Human Vibe. Phaenex 7 (2):28-58.
    This essay investigates a particular form of “affection” that has been neglected by the phenomenological tradition. This particular phenomenon is often referred to as the vibe, vibrations, or some variation thereof. This essay rearticulates “the vibe” as bodily emanation: human beings emanate feeling that is experienced by and through our bodies. My study of bodily emanation begins with Edmund Husserl’s notion of affectivity and then moves to Eugene T. Gendlin’s notion of the sentient body. This discussion enables my own (...)
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  24. Karel Novotny, Pierre Rodrigo, Jenny Slatman & Silvia Stoller (eds.) (2013). Corporeity and Affectivity: Dedicated to Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Brill.
    This volume focuses on Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s important contribution to the phenomenology of corporeity and affectivity, and it explores the various influences his work had and still has on other disciplines.
     
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  25. Robert Zaborowski (2011). Max Scheler's Model of Stratified Affectivity and its Relevance for Research on Emotions. Appraisal 8 (3).
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  26. Joel Krueger (2010). Radical Enactivism and Inter-Corporeal Affectivity. In Thomas Fuchs, Heribert Sattel & Peter Heningnsen (eds.), The Embodied Self: Dimensions, Coherence, and Disorders. Schattauer
  27. Kenneth W. Stikkers (2011). The Politics of Survival: Peirce, Affectivity, and Social Criticism. The Pluralist 6 (2):74-80.
    Although Charles Peirce is generally not interpreted primarily as a social-political philosopher, several commentators on Peirce have contended, along with Lara Trout, that his philosophy “provides significant resources to add to contemporary discussions of social criticism” (11). Trout’s bold, creative, and lively volume, however, is perhaps the first to develop that point systematically and in depth. By reading Peirce as a social critic, Trout argues, we allow the various strands of his thought to come together more fully and, at the (...)
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  28.  3
    Frédéric Seyler (2016). Renaud Barbaras and Michel Henry: A Contemporary Debate on the Status of Affectivity and a Farewell to the "Flesh of the World". Journal of Speculative Philosophy 30 (3):395-403.
    “We accept the original theoretical path opened by Michel Henry, which consists in considering the body from the point of view of the flesh and, hence, of life. But, precisely, the question is to know what is the meaning of life that is attested through the phenomenon of the flesh.”1 Such is Renaud Barbaras’s starting point in La vie lacunaire, one of his most recent contributions to a phenomenology of life and to the debate with Michel Henry’s concept of life (...)
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  29. Christian Lotz (2007). From Affectivity to Subjectivity: Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Christian Lotz shows in this book that Husserl's Phenomenology and its key concept--subjectivity--is based on a concrete anthropological structure, such as self-affection and the bodily experience of the other. The analysis of the sensual sphere and the lived Body forces Husserl to an ongoing correction of his strong methodological assumptions. Subjectivity turns out to be an ambivalent phenomenon, as the subject is unable to fully present itself to itself, and therefore is forced to allow for a fundamental non-transparency in itself.
     
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  30.  20
    Kevin A. Aho (2013). Depression and Embodiment: Phenomenological Reflections on Motility, Affectivity, and Transcendence. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):751-759.
    This paper integrates personal narratives with the methods of phenomenology in order to draw some general conclusions about ‘what it means’ and ‘what it feels like’ to be depressed. The analysis has three parts. First, it explores the ways in which depression disrupts everyday experiences of spatial orientation and motility. This disruption makes it difficult for the person to move and perform basic functional tasks, resulting in a collapse or contraction of the life-world. Second, it illustrates how depression creates a (...)
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  31.  2
    Alfonseca Guerra & Pedro Fernández Olazábal (2016). Affectivity in Women with Depressive Disorders through Rorschach Test. Humanidades Médicas 16 (2):195-214.
    Se realizó una investigación descriptiva con el objetivo de caracterizar la esfera afectiva de mujeres diagnosticadas con trastornos depresivos, en el período comprendido entre 2012 y 2015. La muestra estuvo conformada por 46 mujeres residentes en la provincia de Camagüey, seleccionadas de manera intencional, a partir de los criterios establecidos por los autores del estudio. Se aplicó el Psicodiagnóstico de Rorschach, según la codificación e interpretación del Sistema Comprehensivo de Exner. Como principales resultados se obtuvo que, en la mayoría de (...)
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  32.  10
    Elizabeth A. Behnke (2008). Husserl's Protean Concept of Affectivity. Philosophy Today 52 (Supplement):46-53.
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  33.  2
    Jan Slaby (2016). Mind Invasion: Situated Affectivity and the Corporate Life Hack. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  34.  73
    Robert Zaborowski (2010). From Thumos to Emotion and Feeling. Some Observations on the Passivity and Activity of Affectivity. History and Philosophy of Psychology 12 (1):1–25.
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  35.  15
    F. Scott Scribner (2002). Affectivity, Transparency, Rapport. Idealistic Studies 32 (2):159-170.
    At last scholars are recognizing that the great generative architectonics of idealism’s account of self-consciousness would demand or imply, from a genealogical perspective, an unconscious. Yet, between Foucaultian inspired analyses of madness in Hegel, and Slavoj Zizek’s Lacanian readings of the unconscious in the work of F. W. J. Schelling, there has been essentially no mention of J. G. Fichte. As an attempt to redress this failure, I will begin to sketch Fichte’s own unique articulation of an unconscious (Unbewusst) by (...)
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  36.  19
    Tyler Tritten (2012). Entsetzung as Affectivity: An Account of Passivity in the Late Schelling. Idealistic Studies 42 (1):23-35.
    This article argues that Schelling, contrary to the traditional view which situates him as the mediator between Fichte and Hegel, the link from the absolute activity of the ego to the absolute activity constitutive of transcendental idealism, offered one of the first attempts to ground philosophy in a fundamental passivity. Schelling’s Erlangen lectures (1820-21) in particular provide a penetrating critique of idealistic modes of thought. I will show that these lectures, along with Schelling’s late philosophy as a whole, elaborate consciousness (...)
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  37.  44
    Eva Schwarz (2010). Christian Lotz. 'From Affectivity to Subjectivity. Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited'. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 26 (2):157-165.
  38.  16
    David M. Hammond (1992). Affectivity, Imagination, and Intellect in Newman's Apologia. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 67 (3):271-286.
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  39.  10
    John Kaag (2013). The Politics of Survival: Peirce, Affectivity, and Social Criticism by Lara Trout (Review). The Pluralist 8 (1):119-123.
    Pragmatism, with its insistence that philosophy attend to practical affairs of what Charles Sanders Peirce called "vital importance," has always faced a unique double bind. If it spent too much time on philosophical speculation, it made no difference to practical affairs. But if it fixated on the practical affairs of the social and political realm, it was no longer engaged in philosophy. This double bind is not unique to pragmatism and has shown itself repeatedly in the last two hundred years (...)
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  40.  4
    Joona Taipale (2008). Christian Lotz: From Subjectivity to Affectivity: Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited. Hampshire: Palgrave, 2007. SATS 9 (1).
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  41. David Watson & James W. Pennebaker (1989). Health Complaints, Stress, and Distress: Exploring the Central Role of Negative Affectivity. Psychological Review 96 (2):234-254.
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  42.  7
    E. Imbeault & P. W. Hughes (2015). Phenomenal Consciousness, Affectivity, and Conation: Where Extended Cognition Has Never Gone Before. Review of Feeling Extended: Sociality as Extended Body-Becoming-Mind by Douglas Robinson. Constructivist Foundations 10 (2):271-273.
    Upshot: Douglas Robinson argues for a revision of the extended mind theory that incorporates intersubjectivity and qualia. Robinson argues that “material extendedness” is less important than accounting for the subjective experience of what he terms “body-becoming-mind,” and that this experience, rather than mere computational equivalence between intra- and transcranial cognition, is the strongest argument in favour of the EMT.
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  43.  3
    Mikko Salmela (2002). Intentionality and Feeling. A Sketch for a Two-Level Account of Emotional Affectivity. SATS 3 (1).
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  44.  5
    John Kaag (2013). Review The Politics of Survival: Peirce, Affectivity, and Social Criticism Trout Lara Fordham U P New York. The Pluralist 8 (1):119-123.
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  45.  30
    A. D. Smith (2008). Review of Christian Lotz, From Affectivity to Subjectivity: Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (8).
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  46.  1
    Robert C. Solomon (2003). I. Emotions, Thoughts and Feelings: What is a ‘Cognitive Theory’ of the Emotions and Does It Neglect Affectivity? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:1-18.
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  47.  11
    Joona Taipale (2008). Christian Lotz: From Subjectivity to Affectivity: Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited. Hampshire: Palgrave, 2007 (169 Pp.). [REVIEW] SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):151-157.
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  48.  19
    Dietrich Von Hildebrand (1958). The Role of Affectivity in Morality. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 32:85-95.
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  49.  6
    Kenneth W. Stikkers (2011). The Politics of Survival: Peirce, Affectivity, and Social Criticism, Lara Trout The Politics of Survival: Peirce, Affectivity, and Social Criticism Trout Lara Fordham UP, New York. The Pluralist 6 (2):74-80.
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  50.  20
    Eva Schwarz (2010). Christian Lotz, From Affectivity to Subjectivity. Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited Palgrave Macmillan, 2007, 169 Pages, Isbn 9780230535336, $74.95/€58.99. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 26 (2):157-165.
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