Search results for 'Affectivity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Elizabeth A. Behnke (2008). Interkinaesthetic Affectivity: A Phenomenological Approach. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 41 (2):143-161.score: 24.0
    This Husserlian transcendental-phenomenological investigation of interkinaesthetic affectivity first clarifies the sense of affectivity that is at stake here, then shows how Husserl’s distinctive approach to kinaesthetic experience provides evidential access to the interkinaesthetic field. After describing several structures of interkinaesthetic-affective experience, I indicate how a Husserlian critique of the presupposition that we are “psychophysical” entities might suggest a more inclusive approach to a biosocial plenum that includes all metabolic life.
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  2. Michael Stocker (2002). Some Problems About Affectivity. Philosophical Studies 108 (1-2):151-158.score: 24.0
    Neu's work is splendid. In addition to offering wonderfully illuminating characterizations of various emotions, it helps show that these individual characterizations, rather than an overall characterization of emotions or affectivity, have always been Neu's main concern. Nonetheless he is concerned with specific instances of, and often the general nature of, affectivity: what differentiates mere thoughts, desires, and values from emotions where the complex is affectively charged. I argue that his accounts of affectivity do not succeed — in (...)
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  3. Philippe Cabestan (2004). What is It to Move Oneself Emotionally? Emotion and Affectivity According to Jean-Paul Sartre. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (1):81-96.score: 24.0
    Emotion is traditionally described as a phenomenon that dominates the subject because one does not choose to be angry, sad, or happy. However, would it be totally absurd to conceive emotion as behaviour and a manifestation of the spontaneity and liberty of consciousness? In his short text, Esquisse d''une theorie des émotions, Sartre proposes a phenomenological description of this psychological phenomenon. He distinguishes between constituted affectivity, which gives rise to emotions, and an original affectivity lacking intentionality, and tied (...)
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  4. Giovanna Colombetti & Tom Roberts (forthcoming). Extending the Extended Mind: The Case for Extended Affectivity. Philosophical Studies:1-21.score: 24.0
    The thesis of the extended mind (ExM) holds that the material underpinnings of an individual’s mental states and processes need not be restricted to those contained within biological boundaries: when conditions are right, material artefacts can be incorporated by the thinking subject in such a way as to become a component of her extended mind. Up to this point, the focus of this approach has been on phenomena of a distinctively cognitive nature, such as states of dispositional belief, and processes (...)
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  5. Qingguo Zhai, Margaret Lindorff & Brian Cooper (2013). Workplace Guanxi: Its Dispositional Antecedents and Mediating Role in the Affectivity–Job Satisfaction Relationship. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):541-551.score: 24.0
    This paper examines dispositional sources of workplace guanxi and the mediating role of workplace guanxi on the affectivity and job satisfaction relationship. Data were collected from 808 respondents in multiple industries in a city in China’s northeast. The study found that both positive affectivity and negative affectivity have an effect on supervisor–subordinate guanxi and co-worker guanxi, which supports the proposition that workplace guanxi has a dispositional source. Supervisor–subordinate guanxi has a positive relationship with job satisfaction, although co-worker (...)
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  6. Robert C. Solomon (2003). Emotions, Thoughts, and Feelings: What is a Cognitive Theory of the Emotions and Does It Neglect Affectivity? In A. Hatimoysis (ed.), Philosophy and the Emotions. Cambridge University Press. 1-18.score: 21.0
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  7. Louis A. Sass (2004). Affectivity in Schizophrenia: A Phenomenological View. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (10-11):127-147.score: 21.0
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  8. Howard L. Beams (1954). Affectivity as a Factor in the Apparent Size of Pictured Food Objects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (3):197.score: 21.0
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  9. Mikko Salmela (2002). Intentionality and Feeling. A Sketch for a Two-Level Account of Emotional Affectivity. Philosophia 3 (1):56-75.score: 21.0
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  10. Renaud Barbaras (2004). Affectivity and Movement: The Sense of Sensing in Erwin Straus. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):215-228.score: 18.0
    This paper explores the notion of sensing (Empfinden) as developed by Erwin Straus. It argues that the notion of sensing is at the center of Strauss's thought about animal and human experience. Straus's originality consists in approaching sensory experience from an existential point of view. Sensing is not a mode of knowing. Sensing is distinguished from perceiving but is still a mode of relation to exteriority, and is situated on the side of what is usually called affectivity. At the (...)
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  11. Laszlo Tengelyi (2009). Selfhood, Passivity and Affectivity in Henry and Lévinas. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (3):401 - 414.score: 18.0
    When we compare Henry and Levinas, we stumble upon a difficulty. Henry tries to reduce transcendence to immanence; Levinas, on the contrary, strives to call immance into question and to lend a new dignity to transcendence. Hence, the two thinkers seem to be diametrically opposed to one another. Yet, if one does not limit oneself to such an overall view, one finds some similarities between them. There is an affinity between the two approaches which results from the fact that both (...)
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  12. Béatrice Han-Pile, Affectivity in Existentialist Philosophy.score: 18.0
    Since fully covering such a topic in the short space imparted to this paper is an impossible task, I have chosen to focus on three philosophers: Nietzsche, Heidegger and Sartre. Of the three, only the latter was undoubtedly an existentialist ⎯ Heidegger explicitly rejected the categorisation (in the Letter on Humanism), and there is disagreement among commentators about Nietzsche’s status1. However, they have two major common points which justify my focusing on them: firstly, they uphold the primacy of existence over (...)
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  13. Jason Del Gandio (2012). From Affectivity to Bodily Emanation: An Introduction to the Human Vibe. Phaenex 7 (2):28-58.score: 18.0
    This essay investigates a particular form of “affection” that has been neglected by the phenomenological tradition. This particular phenomenon is often referred to as the vibe, vibrations, or some variation thereof. This essay rearticulates “the vibe” as bodily emanation: human beings emanate feeling that is experienced by and through our bodies. My study of bodily emanation begins with Edmund Husserl’s notion of affectivity and then moves to Eugene T. Gendlin’s notion of the sentient body. This discussion enables my own (...)
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  14. Lee Rice (1999). Action in Spinoza's Account of Affectivity. In Yirmiyahu Yovel (ed.). Little Room Press. 155--168.score: 18.0
    Despite the considerable attention given to Spinoza’s account of affectivity, especially in recent years, scant attention has been paid to the distinction between action and passion, or to the problems which it presents internally (i.e., to Spinozism) and externally (as an adequate component of any theory of affectively). This essay offers a clarification and defense of Spinoza’s account of action and passion. A second theme is the behavioristic nature of Spinoza’s account of human affectivity. Despite the bad press (...)
     
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  15. Tyler Tritten (2012). Entsetzung as Affectivity: An Account of Passivity in the Late Schelling. Idealistic Studies 42 (1):23-35.score: 16.0
    This article argues that Schelling, contrary to the traditional view which situates him as the mediator between Fichte and Hegel, the link from the absolute activity of the ego to the absolute activity constitutive of transcendental idealism, offered one of the first attempts to ground philosophy in a fundamental passivity. Schelling’s Erlangen lectures (1820-21) in particular provide a penetrating critique of idealistic modes of thought. I will show that these lectures, along with Schelling’s late philosophy as a whole, elaborate consciousness (...)
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  16. Christian Lotz (2007). From Affectivity to Subjectivity: Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 16.0
    Christian Lotz shows in this book that Husserl's Phenomenology and its key concept--subjectivity--is based on a concrete anthropological structure, such as self-affection and the bodily experience of the other. The analysis of the sensual sphere and the lived Body forces Husserl to an ongoing correction of his strong methodological assumptions. Subjectivity turns out to be an ambivalent phenomenon, as the subject is unable to fully present itself to itself, and therefore is forced to allow for a fundamental non-transparency in itself.
     
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  17. F. Scott Scribner (2002). Affectivity, Transparency, Rapport. Idealistic Studies 32 (2):159-170.score: 16.0
    At last scholars are recognizing that the great generative architectonics of idealism’s account of self-consciousness would demand or imply, from a genealogical perspective, an unconscious. Yet, between Foucaultian inspired analyses of madness in Hegel, and Slavoj Zizek’s Lacanian readings of the unconscious in the work of F. W. J. Schelling, there has been essentially no mention of J. G. Fichte. As an attempt to redress this failure, I will begin to sketch Fichte’s own unique articulation of an unconscious (Unbewusst) by (...)
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  18. Joel Krueger (2010). Radical Enactivism and Inter-Corporeal Affectivity. In Thomas Fuchs, Heribert Sattel & Peter Heningnsen (eds.), The Embodied Self: Dimensions, Coherence, and Disorders. Schattauer.score: 15.0
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  19. Eva Schwarz (2010). Christian Lotz. 'From Affectivity to Subjectivity. Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited'. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 26 (2):157-165.score: 15.0
  20. A. D. Smith (2008). Review of Christian Lotz, From Affectivity to Subjectivity: Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (8).score: 15.0
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  21. Brian Harding (2012). Auto-Affectivity and Michel Henry's Material Phenomenology. Philosophical Forum 43 (1):91-100.score: 15.0
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  22. Eva Schwarz (2010). Christian Lotz, From Affectivity to Subjectivity. Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited Palgrave Macmillan, 2007, 169 Pages, Isbn 9780230535336, $74.95/€58.99. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 26 (2):157-165.score: 15.0
  23. Mufid James Hannush (2011). R. D. Stolorow (2011). World, Affectivity, Trauma: Heidegger and Post-Cartesian Psychoanalysis. New York: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, 121 Pp., ISBN 978-0-415-89344-2, $19.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 42 (2):217-221.score: 15.0
  24. Dietrich Von Hildebrand (1958). The Role of Affectivity in Morality. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 32:85-95.score: 15.0
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  25. Martin Heinze (2009). Affectivity and Personality: Mediated by the Social. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):273-275.score: 15.0
  26. Kenneth W. Stikkers (2011). The Politics of Survival: Peirce, Affectivity, and Social Criticism. The Pluralist 6 (2):74-80.score: 15.0
    Although Charles Peirce is generally not interpreted primarily as a social-political philosopher, several commentators on Peirce have contended, along with Lara Trout, that his philosophy “provides significant resources to add to contemporary discussions of social criticism” (11). Trout’s bold, creative, and lively volume, however, is perhaps the first to develop that point systematically and in depth. By reading Peirce as a social critic, Trout argues, we allow the various strands of his thought to come together more fully and, at the (...)
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  27. Laurence Thomas (1988). Rationality and Affectivity: The Metaphysics of the Moral Self. Social Philosophy and Policy 5 (02):154-.score: 15.0
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  28. Kevin A. Aho (2013). Depression and Embodiment: Phenomenological Reflections on Motility, Affectivity, and Transcendence. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):751-759.score: 15.0
    This paper integrates personal narratives with the methods of phenomenology in order to draw some general conclusions about ‘what it means’ and ‘what it feels like’ to be depressed. The analysis has three parts. First, it explores the ways in which depression disrupts everyday experiences of spatial orientation and motility. This disruption makes it difficult for the person to move and perform basic functional tasks, resulting in a collapse or contraction of the life-world. Second, it illustrates how depression creates a (...)
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  29. David A. Dilworth (2012). The Politics of Survival: Peirce, Affectivity, and Social Criticism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (4):524-528.score: 15.0
    In this book Lara Trout provides provocative but problematic food for thought. She crafts an exegesis of Peirce's concepts of evolutionary agapism and critical commonsensism as resources for a theory of social justice aligned with contemporary race and gender theories. Conforming Peirce's tenets to her own agenda, she develops a radical politics of societal inclusiveness by way of analyzing and critiquing putative "nonconscious biases" in the "background" beliefs of broad segments of the contemporary populace. Unfortunately, this steers Peirce's ship on (...)
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  30. Anthony Vincent Fernandez (2014). Robert Stolorow's World, Affectivity, Trauma: Heidegger and Post-Cartesian Psychoanalysis. [REVIEW] Human Studies 37 (2):287-292.score: 15.0
    The community of psychiatrists and psychologists in early twentieth century Europe cultivated a strong interest in the phenomenologically informed accounts of human existence offered by Heidegger. The psychiatrists, Binswanger (1968) and Boss (1957/1963; 1970/1979), developed personal relationships with Heidegger, and while Heidegger ultimately rejected Binswanger’s work, Boss worked closely with him throughout his life in order to keep his own work on a sound phenomenological footing. This interest in phenomenologically informed psychological practice and theory continued into the latter half of (...)
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  31. Arthur Bultmann Grenoble (1975). Attitude, Affectivity and Prediction. Journal of Value Inquiry 9 (4):312-314.score: 15.0
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  32. Andrew Tallon (1996). Triune Consciousness and Some Recent Studies of Affectivity. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 70 (2):243-273.score: 15.0
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  33. David A. Dilworth (2011). The Politics of Survival: Peirce, Affectivity, and Social Criticism By Lara Trout. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (4):524-528.score: 15.0
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  34. David M. Hammond (1992). Affectivity, Imagination, and Intellect in Newman's Apologia. Thought 67 (3):271-286.score: 15.0
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  35. Elizabeth A. Behnke (2008). Husserl's Protean Concept of Affectivity. Philosophy Today 52 (Supplement):46-53.score: 15.0
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  36. Rajiv Kaushik (2008). Affectivity and Religious Experience. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 8:55-71.score: 15.0
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  37. Mikko Salmela (2002). The Problem of Affectivity in Cognitive Theories of Emotion. Consciousness and Emotion 3 (2):159-182.score: 15.0
  38. Donn Welton (2012). Bodily Intentionality, Affectivity, and Basic Affects. In Dan Zahavi (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Phenomenology. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
     
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  39. Scott Davis (1994). Morality, “Affectivity”, and Practical Knowledge. Modern Theology 10 (1):59-79.score: 15.0
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  40. John Green (2008). The Philosophic Transvaluation of the 'Affectivity' of the Judaeo-Christian Inheritance. Australasian Catholic Record, The 85 (1):69.score: 15.0
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  41. John Kaag (2013). The Politics of Survival: Peirce, Affectivity, and Social Criticism by Lara Trout (Review). The Pluralist 8 (1):119-123.score: 15.0
    Pragmatism, with its insistence that philosophy attend to practical affairs of what Charles Sanders Peirce called "vital importance," has always faced a unique double bind. If it spent too much time on philosophical speculation, it made no difference to practical affairs. But if it fixated on the practical affairs of the social and political realm, it was no longer engaged in philosophy. This double bind is not unique to pragmatism and has shown itself repeatedly in the last two hundred years (...)
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  42. Neil Campbell (2000). Physicalism, Qualia Inversion, and Affective States. Synthese 124 (2):239-256.score: 12.0
    I argue that the inverted spectrum hypothesis is nota possibility we should take seriously. The principlereason is that if someone's qualia were inverted inthe specified manner there is reason to believe thephenomenal difference would manifest itself inbehaviour. This is so for two reasons. First, Isuggest that qualia, including phenomenal colours, arepartly constituted by an affective component whichwould be inverted along with the connected qualia. Theresulting affective inversions will, given theintimate connections that exist between emotions andbehaviour, likely manifest themselves in behaviour, (...)
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  43. Thomas Fuchs & Sabine C. Koch (2014). Embodied Affectivity: On Moving and Being Moved. Frontiers in Psychology 5.score: 10.0
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  44. Joona Taipale (2008). Christian Lotz: From Subjectivity to Affectivity: Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited. Hampshire: Palgrave, 2007 (169 Pp.). [REVIEW] SATS 9 (1):151-157.score: 10.0
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  45. Fausto Eduardo Menon Pinto (2002). As Razões Do Coração: As (Prováveis) Características da Afetividade Na Psicologia; The Reasons of the Heart: The (Probable) Characteristics of Affectivity in Psychology. Aletheia 16:129-135.score: 10.0
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  46. Jason Del Gandio (2012). From Affectivity to Bodily Emanation: An Introduction to the Human Vibe. Phaenex 7 (2):28-58.score: 10.0
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  47. Rajiv Kaushik (2011). Affectivity and Religious Experience: Husserl's “God” in the Unpublished Manuscripts. The New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 8 (1):55-71.score: 10.0
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  48. Thomas Berry (2003). Affectivity in Classical Confucian Tradition. In Weiming Tu & Mary Evelyn Tucker (eds.), Confucian Spirituality. Crossroad Pub. Company. 1--96.score: 10.0
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  49. Boyd Taylor Coolman (2007). The Salvific Affectivity of Christ According to Alexander of Hales. The Thomist 71 (1):1-38.score: 10.0
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  50. R. Durie (forthcoming). 'Affectivity', The British Society for Phenomenology Conference. Radical Philosophy.score: 10.0
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