Search results for 'Affordance' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Silvano Zipoli Caiani (2014). Extending the Notion of Affordance. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (2):275-293.score: 24.0
    Post-Gibson attempts to set out a definition of affordance generally agree that this notion can be understood as a property of the environment with salience for an organism’s behavior. According to this view, some scholars advocate the idea that affordances are dispositional properties of physical objects that, given suitable circumstances, necessarily actualize related actions. This paper aims at assessing this statement in light of a theory of affordance perception. After years of discontinuity between strands of empirical and theoretical (...)
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  2. Mark Reybrouck (2012). Musical Sense-Making and the Concept of Affordance: An Ecosemiotic and Experiential Approach. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 5 (3):391-409.score: 24.0
    This article is interdisciplinary in its claims. Evolving around the ecological concept of affordance, it brings together pragmatics and ecological psychology. Starting from the theoretical writings of Peirce, Dewey and James, the biosemiotic claims of von Uexküll, Gibson’s ecological approach to perception and some empirical evidence from recent neurobiological research, it elaborates on the concepts of experiential and enactive cognition as applied to music. In order to provide an operational description of this approach, it introduces some conceptual tools from (...)
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  3. Jiajie Zhang & Vimla L. Patel (2006). Distributed Cognition, Representation, and Affordance. Pragmatics and Cognition 14 (2):333-341.score: 21.0
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  4. Huang Xiang (2013). Does Conditional Affordance Imply Representational Non-Conceptual Content? Frontiers of Philosophy in China 8 (3):485-497.score: 21.0
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  5. Thomas Natsoulas (2004). To See Things is to Perceive What They Afford: James J. Gibson's Concept of Affordance. Journal of Mind and Behavior 25 (4):323-347.score: 21.0
     
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  6. Adrian Alsmith (2012). The Concept of a Structural Affordance. Avant 3 (2):94-107.score: 20.0
    I provide an analysis of the concept of an “affordance” that enables one to conceive of “structural affordance” as a kind of affordance relation that might hold between an agent and its body. I then review research in the science of humanoid bodily movement to indicate the empirical reality of structural affordance.
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  7. Damiaan Denys Sanneke de Haan, Erik Rietveld, Martin Stokhof (2013). The Phenomenology of Deep Brain Stimulation-Induced Changes in OCD: An Enactive Affordance-Based Model. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 20.0
    People suffering from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) do things they do not want to do, and/or they think things they do not want to think. In about 10 percent of OCD patients, none of the available treatment options is effective. A small group of these patients is currently being treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). Deep brain stimulation involves the implantation of electrodes in the brain. These electrodes give a continuous electrical pulse to the brain area in which they are implanted. (...)
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  8. Arthur M. Glenberg, Monica R. Cowart & Michael P. Kaschak (2001). An Affordance Field for Guiding Movement and Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):43-44.score: 18.0
    An embodied movement-planning field cannot account for behavior and cognition more abstract than that of reaching. Instead, we propose an affordance field, and we sketch how it could enhance the analysis of the A-not-B error, underlie cognition, and serve as a base for language. Admittedly, a dynamic systems account of an affordance field awaits significant further development.
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  9. Paul J. Treffner (1999). The Common Structure is the Affordance in the Ecology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):731-732.score: 18.0
    Millikan's discussion of substance concepts in terms of their information-gathering role ignores the analyses of information-based perception and action developed within the tradition of ecological psychology. Her introduction and use without definition of key Gibsonian terms such as “affordance” and “direct perception” leaves those of us investigating such concepts uncertain of the extent to which she appreciates their theoretical importance. Due recognition of the realist account of categorical perception developed by J. J. Gibson would provide mutual benefit to modern (...)
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  10. Albert Postma, Rob van der Lubbe & Sander Zuidhoek (2001). The Ventral Stream Offers More Affordance and the Dorsal Stream More Memory Than Believed. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):115-116.score: 18.0
    Opposed to Norman's proposal, processing of affordance is likely to occur not solely in the dorsal stream but also in the ventral stream. Moreover, the dorsal stream might do more than just serve an important role in motor actions. It supports egocentric location coding as well. As such, it would possess a form of representational memory, contrary to Norman's proposal.
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  11. Anna Estany & Sergio Martínez (2013). “Scaffolding” and “Affordance” as Integrative Concepts in the Cognitive Sciences. Philosophical Psychology 27 (1):1-14.score: 18.0
    There are (at least) two ways to think of the differences in basic concepts and typologies that one can find in the different scientific practices that constitute a research tradition. One is the fundamentalist view: the fewer the better. The other is a non-fundamentalist view of science whereby the integration of different concepts into the right abstraction grounds an explanation that is not grounded as the sum of the explanations supported by the parts. Integrative concepts are often associated with idealizations (...)
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  12. Michael Hammond, What is an Affordance and Can It Help Us Understand the Use of ICT in Education?score: 18.0
    This paper revisits the concept of affordance and explores its contribution to an understanding of the use of ICT for teaching and learning. It looks at Gibson‟s original idea of affordance and at some of the difficulties long associated with the use of the word. It goes on to describe the translation of the concept of affordance into the field of design through the work, in particular, of Norman. The concept has since been translated into research concerning (...)
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  13. Pheng Cheah (2002). Affordance', or Vulnerable Freedom: A Response to Cornell and Murphy's 'Anti-Racism, Multiculturalism and the Ethics of Identification. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (4):451-462.score: 15.0
  14. Siu L. Chow (1989). An Intentional Analysis of "Affordance" Revisited. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 19 (3):357–365.score: 15.0
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  15. G. P. Ginsburg (1990). The Ecological Perception Debate: An Affordance of the Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 20 (4):347–364.score: 15.0
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  16. Patric Bach, Toby Nicholson & Matthew Hudson (2014). The Affordance-Matching Hypothesis: How Objects Guide Action Understanding and Prediction. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 15.0
  17. Ettore Ambrosini, Claudia Scorolli, Anna M. Borghi & Marcello Costantini (2012). Which Body for Embodied Cognition? Affordance and Language Within Actual and Perceived Reaching Space. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1551-1557.score: 15.0
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  18. D. Cunningham (forthcoming). Abduction and Affordance: JJ Gibson and Theories of Semiosis. Semiotics:27-33.score: 15.0
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  19. Chris Fields (1989). Affordance Perception and the Y-Magnocellular Pathway. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):403.score: 15.0
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  20. Patricia Garrido-Vásquez & Anna Schubö (2014). Modulation of Visual Attention by Object Affordance. Frontiers in Psychology 5.score: 15.0
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  21. Joseph Bulbulia & Richard Sosis (2009). Ideology as Cooperative Affordance. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (6):515-516.score: 15.0
    McKay & Dennett (M&D) observe that beliefs need not be true in order to evolve. We connect this insight with Schelling's work on cooperative commitment to suggest that some beliefs are best approached as social goals. We explain why a social-interactive perspective is important to explaining the dynamics of belief formation and revision among situated partners.
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  22. Donald J. Cunningham (forthcoming). Abduction and Affordance. Semiotics:27-33.score: 15.0
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  23. Humphreys G. (2008). The Mu Rhythm Response to Object Affordance. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 15.0
  24. Mike Michael & Arthur Still (1992). A Resource for Resistance: Power-Knowledge and Affordance. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 21 (6):869-888.score: 15.0
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  25. Anthony Sinclair (2000). Constellations of Knowledge: Human Agency and Material Affordance in Lithic Technology. In Marcia-Anne Dobres & John E. Robb (eds.), Agency in Archaeology. Routledge. 196--212.score: 15.0
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  26. P. J. Treffner (1999). The Common Structure of Concepts is the Affordance in the Ecology. Commentary on Ruth Millikan's “A Common Structure of Individuals, Stuffs, and Real Kinds.”. [REVIEW] Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22:729-733.score: 15.0
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  27. M. T. Turvey, Kevin Shockley & Claudia Carello (1999). Affordance, Proper Function, and the Physical Basis of Perceived Heaviness. Cognition 73 (2):B17-B26.score: 15.0
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  28. M. Wilf, N. P. Holmes, I. Schwartz & T. R. Makin (2012). Dissociating Between Object Affordances and Spatial Compatibility Effects Using Early Response Components. Frontiers in Psychology 4:591-591.score: 14.0
    Perception and action are tightly linked: objects may be perceived not only in terms of visual features, but also in terms of possibilities for action. Previous studies showed that when a centrally located object has a salient graspable feature (e.g., a handle), it facilitates motor responses corresponding with the feature's position. However, such so-called affordance effects have been criticized as resulting from spatial compatibility effects, due to the visual asymmetry created by the graspable feature, irrespective of any affordances. In (...)
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  29. François Osiurak (2013). Apraxia of Tool Use is Not a Matter of Affordances. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:890.score: 12.0
    Apraxia of tool use is not a matter of affordances.
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  30. John T. Sanders (1997). An Ontology of Affordances. Ecological Psychology 9 (1):97-112.score: 10.0
    I argue that the most promising approach to understanding J.J. Gibson's "affordances" takes affordances themselves as ontological primitives, instead of treating them as dispositional properties of more primitive things, events, surfaces, or substances. These latter are best treated as coalescences of affordances present in the environment (or "coalescences of use-potential," as in Sanders (1994) and Hilditch (1995)). On this view, even the ecological approach's stress on the complementary organism/environment pair is seen as expressing a particular affordance relation between the (...)
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  31. Erik Rietveld (2012). Bodily Intentionality and Social Affordances in Context. In Fabio Paglieri (ed.), Consciousness in Interaction. !e role of the natural and social context in shaping consciousness. John Benjamins Publishing Company.score: 10.0
    There are important structural similarities in the way that animals and humans engage in unreflective activities, including unreflective social interactions in the case of higher animals. Firstly, it is a form of unreflective embodied intelligence that is ‘motivated’ by the situation. Secondly, both humans and non-human animals are responsive to ‘affordances’ (Gibson 1979); to possibilities for action offered by an environment. Thirdly, both humans and animals are selectively responsive to one affordance rather than another. Social affordances are a subcategory (...)
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  32. Alan Costall (2012). Canonical Affordances in Context. Avant 3 (2):85-93.score: 10.0
    James Gibson’s concept of affordances was an attempt to undermine the traditional dualism of the objective and subjective. Gibson himself insisted on the continuity of “affordances in general” and those attached to human artifacts. However, a crucial distinction needs to be drawn between “affordances in general” and the “canonical affordances” that are connected primarily to artifacts. Canonical affordances are conventional and normative. It is only in such cases that it makes sense to talk of the affordance of the object. (...)
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  33. Eric Arnau & Andreu Ballús (2013). Innovative Scaffolding: Understanding Innovation as the Disclosure of Hidden Affordances. Revista Iberoamericana de Argumentación 7:1-11.score: 10.0
    Much attention has been drawn to the cognitive basis of innovation. While interesting in many ways, this poses the threat of falling back to traditional internalist assumptions with regard to cognition. We oppose the ensuing contrast between internal cognitive processing and external public practices and technologies that such internal cognitive systems might produce and utilize. We argue that innovation is best understood from the gibsonian notion of affordance, and that many innovative practices emerge from the external scaffolding of cognitive (...)
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  34. Damiano Menin & Andrea Schiavio (2012). Rethinking Musical Affordances. Avant 3 (2):202-215.score: 10.0
    The notion of affordance has been introduced by Gibson (1977, 1979) as the feature of an object or the environment that allows the observer to perform an action, a set of “environmental supports for an organism’s intentional activities” (Reybrouck 2005). Studied under very different perspectives, this concept has become a crucial issue not only for the ecological psychology, but also for cognitive sciences, artificial intelligence studies, and philosophy of mind. This variety of approaches has widened the already ambiguous definition (...)
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  35. David Kirsh (2005). Metacognition, Distributed Cognition and Visual Design. In Peter Gardenfors, Petter Johansson & N. J. Mahwah (eds.), Cognition, education, and communication technology. Erlbaum Associates. 147--180.score: 9.0
    Metacognition is associated with planning, monitoring, evaluating and repairing performance Designers of elearning systems can improve the quality of their environments by explicitly structuring the visual and interactive display of learning contexts to facilitate metacognition. Typically page layout, navigational appearance, visual and interactivity design are not viewed as major factors in metacognition. This is because metacognition tends to be interpreted as a process in the head, rather than an interactive one. It is argued here, that cognition and metacognition are part (...)
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  36. Joel Krueger (2011). Doing Things with Music. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):1-22.score: 9.0
    This paper is an exploration of how we do things with music—that is, the way that we use music as an esthetic technology to enact micro-practices of emotion regulation, communicative expression, identity construction, and interpersonal coordination that drive core aspects of our emotional and social existence. The main thesis is: from birth, music is directly perceived as an affordance-laden structure. Music, I argue, affords a sonic world, an exploratory space or nested acoustic environment that further affords possibilities for, among (...)
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  37. Adrian J. T. Smith (2009). Acting on (Bodily) Experience. Psyche 15 (1):82 - 99.score: 9.0
    The complexities of bodily experience are outlined; its spatial phenomenology is specified as the explanatory target. The mereological structure of body representation is discussed; it is claimed that global spatial representations of the body are not necessary, as structural features of the actual body can be exploited in partial internal representation. The spatial structure of bodily experience is discussed; a structural affordance theory is introduced; it is claimed that bodily experience and subpersonal representation have action-orientated content; and that egocentric (...)
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  38. John Weckert (2010). Comments on “Trust and New Communication Technologies: Vicious Circles, Virtuous Circles, Possible Futures”. [REVIEW] Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):307-309.score: 9.0
    These comments claim that a shift has occurred between early discussions of online trust, where the focus was on the possibility of such trust and later ones, such as Ess’s, where the concern is more with the influence of the new communication technologies on trust in general. The comments, then, focus on affordance as examined by Ess, arguing that it is, indeed, a central issue in new communications and trust.
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  39. Anna M. Borghi Filomena Anelli, Roberto Nicoletti, Roberto Bolzani (2013). Keep Away From Danger: Dangerous Objects in Dynamic and Static Situations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 9.0
    Behavioral and neuroscience studies have shown that objects observation evokes specific affordances (i.e., action possibilities) and motor responses. Recent findings provide evidence that even dangerous objects can modulate the motor system evoking aversive affordances. This sounds intriguing since so far the majority of behavioral, brain imaging, and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies with painful and dangerous stimuli strictly concerned the domain of pain, excepted for evidence suggesting sensitivity to objects’ affordances when neutral objects are located in participants’ peripersonal space. This study (...)
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  40. Harry Heft (1989). Affordances and the Body: An Intentional Analysis of Gibson's Ecological Approach to Visual Perception. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 19 (1):1–30.score: 8.0
    In his ecological approach to perception, james gibson introduced the concept of affordance to refer to the perceived meaning of environmental objects and events. this paper examines the relational and causal character of affordances, as well as the grounds for extending affordances beyond environmental features with transcultural meaning to include those features with culturally-specific meaning. such an extension is seen as warranted once affordances are grounded in an intentional analysis of perception. toward this end, aspects of merleau-ponty's treatment of (...)
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  41. Andrea Scarantino (2003). Affordances Explained. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):949-961.score: 8.0
    I examine the central theoretical construct of ecological psychology, the concept of an affordance. In the first part of the paper, I illustrate the role affordances play in Gibson's theory of perception. In the second part, I argue that affordances are to be understood as dispositional properties, and explain what I take to be their characteristic background circumstances, triggering circumstances and manifestations. The main purpose of my analysis is to give affordances a theoretical identity enriched by Gibson's visionary insight, (...)
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  42. Jan Almäng (2008). Affordances and the Nature of Perceptual Content. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (2):161 - 177.score: 8.0
    According to John McDowell,<span class='Hi'></span> representational perceptual content is conceptual through and through.<span class='Hi'></span> This paper criticizes this view by claiming that there is a certain kind of representational and non-conceptual perceptual content that is sensitive to bodily skills.<span class='Hi'></span> After a brief introduction to McDowell's position,<span class='Hi'></span> Merleau-Ponty's notion of body schema and Gibson's notion of affordance are presented.<span class='Hi'></span> It is argued that affordances are constitutive of representational perceptual content,<span class='Hi'></span> and that at least some affordances,<span class='Hi'></span> (...)
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  43. John T. Sanders (1999). Affordances: An Ecological Approach to First Philosophy. In Gail Weiss & Honi Fern Haber (eds.), Perspectives on Embodiment: The Intersections of Nature and Culture. Routledge. 121--42.score: 8.0
    Interest in "embodiment", and over how one may best express the implications of embodiment, is no parochial question, of interest only to a small number of effete philosophers. It confronts perceptual psychologists, developmental psychologists, and psychotherapists, of course. It may not be surprising, either, that it has become an important issue to some students of history and sociology, and to linguists, literary theorists and aestheticians. But that's not all. As physicists -- working within the very bastion of "objective" analysis -- (...)
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  44. Simon Prosser (2011). Affordances and Phenomenal Character in Spatial Perception. Philosophical Review 120 (4):475-513.score: 8.0
    Intentionalism is the view that the phenomenal character of a conscious experience is wholly determined by, or even reducible to, its representational content. In this essay I put forward a version of intentionalism that allows (though does not require) the reduction of phenomenal character to representational content. Unlike other reductionist theories, however, it does not require the acceptance of phenomenal externalism (the view that phenomenal character does not supervene on the internal state of the subject). According the view offered here, (...)
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  45. Anthony Chemero & Michael T. Turvey, Gibsonian Affordances for Roboticists.score: 8.0
    Using hypersets as an analytic tool, we compare traditionally Gibsonian (Chemero 2003; Turvey 1992) and representationalist (Sahin et al. this issue) understandings of the notion ‘affordance’. We show that representationalist understandings are incompatible with direct perception and erect barriers between animal and environment. They are, therefore, scarcely recognizable as understandings of ‘affordance’. In contrast, Gibsonian understandings are shown to treat animal-environment systems as unified complex systems and to be compatible with direct perception. We discuss the fruitful connections between (...)
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  46. Garry Young (2005). Ecological Perception Affords an Explanation of Object Permanence. Philosophical Explorations 8 (2):189-208.score: 8.0
    In this paper I aim to present an explanation of object permanence that is derived from an ecological account of perceptually based action. In understanding why children below a certain age do not search for occluded objects, one must first understand the process by which these children perform certain intentional actions on non-occluded items; and to do this one must understand the role affordances play in eliciting retrieval behaviour. My affordance-based explanation is contrasted with Shinskey and Munakata's graded representation (...)
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  47. Rob Withagen & Anthony Chemero (2011). Affordances and Classification: On the Significance of a Sidebar in James Gibson's Last Book. Philosophical Psychology 25 (4):521 - 537.score: 8.0
    This article is about a sidebar in James Gibson's last book, The ecological approach to visual perception. In this sidebar, Gibson, the founder of the ecological perspective of perception and action, argued that to perceive an affordance is not to classify an object. Although this sidebar has received scant attention, it is of great significance both historically and for recent discussions about specificity, direct perception, and the functions of the dorsal and ventral streams. It is argued that Gibson's acknowledgment (...)
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  48. T. Ziemke (2011). Realism Redux: Gibson's Affordances Get a Well-Deserved Update. Constructivist Foundations 7 (1):87-89.score: 8.0
    Upshot: Chemero provides a modern re-interpretation of Gibson’s ecological psychology and his affordance concept that is more coherent than the original and in line with antirepresentationalist, dynamical theories in embodied cognitive science. He argues for a radical embodied cognitive science, in which ecological and enactive approaches join forces against the more watered-down, mainstream embodied cognitive science that still maintains traditional commitments to representationalism and computationalism. He also defends a special version of realism, entity realism, which many constructivists might not (...)
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  49. Peter West-Oram (2013). Freedom of Conscience and Health Care in the United States of America: The Conflict Between Public Health and Religious Liberty in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (3):237-247.score: 8.0
    The recent confirmation of the constitutionality of the Obama administration’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) by the US Supreme Court has brought to the fore long-standing debates over individual liberty and religious freedom. Advocates of personal liberty are often critical, particularly in the USA, of public health measures which they deem to be overly restrictive of personal choice. In addition to the alleged restrictions of individual freedom of choice when it comes to the question of whether or not (...)
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