Search results for 'African Americans Civil rights' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  5
    Carl B. Anderson (2013). The Trouble with Unifying Narratives: African Americans and the Civil Rights Movement in U.S. History Content Standards. Journal of Social Studies Research 37 (2):111-120.
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  2.  12
    Derrick Darby (2009). Rights, Race, and Recognition. Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction -- Having rights -- Rights without recognition -- Rights and recognition -- Race and rights -- What's wrong with slavery?
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  3.  35
    John David Skrentny (1998). The Effect of the Cold War on African-American Civil Rights: America and the World Audience, 1945–1968. Theory and Society 27 (2):237-285.
  4.  8
    Leslie A. Schwalm (2011). Surviving Wartime Emancipation: African Americans and the Cost of Civil War. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39 (1):21-27.
    The U.S. Civil War chained slave emancipation to war's violence, destruction and deprivation. The resulting health crisis, including illness, injury, and trauma, had immediate and lasting consequences. This essay explores the impact of ideas about race on the U.S. military's health care provisions and treatment of former slaves, both civilians and soldiers.
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  5.  1
    Barry Strauss (2005). The Black Phalanx: African-Americans and the Classics After the Civil War. Arion 12 (3):39-63.
  6. Leslie A. Schwalm (2011). Surviving Wartime Emancipation: African Americans and the Cost of Civil War. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (1):21-27.
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  7. Clarence Sholé Johnson (2003). Cornel West & Philosophy: The Quest for Social Justice. Routledge.
    Cornel West's reputation as a public and celebrity intellectual has overshadowed his important contributions to philosophy. Professor Clarence Shole Johnson provides a rectification of this situation in this benchmark, thought-provoking book. After a brief biographical sketch, Johnson leads us through a comprehensive examination of West's philosophy from his conceptions of pragmatism, existentialism, Marxism, and Prophetic Christianity to his persuasive writings on black-Jewish relations, affirmative action, and the role of black intellectuals. Special focus is given to West's writings on ethics and (...)
     
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  8. Native Americans (2008). Homo Sapiens 41; 102 Human Rights 70, 72 Human Variability 21, 94 Hypothesis 37, 42 Ideal Vs. Real Culture 11. In Philip Carl Salzman & Patricia C. Rice (eds.), Thinking Anthropologically: A Practical Guide for Students. Pearson Prentice Hall 45--120.
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  9.  39
    Thaddeus Metz (2014). African Values and Human Rights as Two Sides of the Same Coin: Reply to Oyowe. African Human Rights Law Journal 14 (2):306-21.
    In an article previously published in this Journal, Anthony Oyowe critically engages with my attempt to demonstrate how the human rights characteristic of South Africa’s Constitution can be grounded on a certain interpretation of Afro-communitarian values that are often associated with talk of ‘ubuntu’. Drawing on recurrent themes of human dignity and communal relationships in the sub-Saharan tradition, I have advanced a moral-philosophical principle that I argue entails and plausibly explains a wide array of individual rights to (...) liberties, political power, criminal procedures and economic resources. Oyowe’s most important criticism of my theory is in effect that it is caught in a dilemma: either the principle I articulate can account for human rights, in which case it does not count as communitarian, or it does count as the latter, but cannot account for the former. In this article, I reply to Oyowe, contending that he misinterprets key facets of my theory to the point of not yet engaging with its core strategy for deriving human rights from salient elements of ubuntu. I conclude that Oyowe is unjustified in claiming that there are ‘theoretical lapses’ that ‘cast enormous doubts’ on my project of deriving human rights from a basic moral principle with a recognizably sub-Saharan and communitarian pedigree. (shrink)
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  10.  4
    Leigh Raiford (2009). Photography and the Practices of Critical Black Memory. History and Theory 48 (4):112-129.
    Not too long after photography’s grand debut in 1839, physician and inventor Oliver Wendell Holmes described the new technology as a “mirror with a memory.” What might this phrase mean for the question of African Americans and their relationship to the vicissitudes of photography and the vagaries of memory in particular? Through readings of works of art and social activism that make use of lynching photographs, this essay considers ways in which photography has functioned as a technology of (...)
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  11.  21
    Thaddeus Metz (2014). African Values, Human Rights and Group Rights: A Philosophical Foundation for the Banjul Charter. In Oche Onazi (ed.), African Legal Theory and Contemporary Problems: Critical Essays. Springer 131-51.
    A communitarian perspective, which is characteristic of African normative thought, accords some kind of primacy to society or a group, whereas human rights are by definition duties that others have to treat individuals in certain ways, even when not doing so would be better for others. Is there any place for human rights in an Afro-communitarian political and legal philosophy, and, if so, what is it? I seek to answer these questions, in part by critically exploring one (...)
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  12.  19
    Gregory Lewis Bynum (2011). Kant's Conception of Respect and African American Education Rights. Educational Theory 61 (1):17-40.
    Immanuel Kant envisioned a kind of respect in which one recognizes each human (1) as being not fully comprehensible by any human understanding, (2) as being an end in him- or herself, and (3) as being a potential source of moral law. In this essay, Gregory Lewis Bynum uses this conception of respect as a lens with which to examine African American education rights on three levels: the individual level (the level of individual persons' moral experience and moral (...)
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  13. J. Hatch & A. Holmes (forthcoming). Rural and Small Town African American Populations and Human Rights Post Industrial Society. Bioethics Research Concerns and Directions for African Americans. Tuskegee, Alabama: Tuskegee University National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care.
     
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  14.  32
    Ugo Pagallo (2013). Online Security and the Protection of Civil Rights: A Legal Overview. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 26 (4):381-395.
    The paper examines the connection between online security and the protection of civil rights from a legal viewpoint, that is, considering the different types of rights and interests that are at stake in national and international law and whether, and to what extent, they concern matters of balancing. Over the past years, the purpose of several laws, and legislative drafts such as ACTA, has been to impose “zero-sum games”. In light of current statutes, such as HADOPI in (...)
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  15.  27
    Thaddeus Metz (2016). An African Theory of Social Justice. In Camilla Boisen & Matthew Murray (eds.), Distributive Justice Debates in Political and Social Thought: Perspectives on Finding a Fair Share. Routledge 171-190.
    A comprehensive account of justice grounded on salient Afro-communitarian values, the article attempts to unify views about the distribution of economic resources, the protection of human rights and the provision of social recognition as ultimately being about proper ways to value loving relationships.
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  16.  8
    Asta Jakutytė-Sungailienė (2012). The System of Objects of Civil Rights: Problem of Concepts. Jurisprudence 19 (1):143-157.
    The Civil Code of Lithuania (1964), in force until 2000, did not regulate the objects of civil rights, thus Chapter V of Part III of Book I of the Civil Code of Lithuania is a significant novelty. Several approaches to an abstract definition of the objects of civil rights still exists in the legal doctrine: whether the object of civil rights and the object of the civil relationship coincide; is the object (...)
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  17.  1
    Angry Decades & Darlene Clark Hine (1995). Civil Rights and Women's. In Beverly Guy-Sheftal (ed.), Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought. The New Press
  18. Thomas Sowed (2002). The Civil Rights Vision. In Tommy Lee Lott (ed.), African-American Philosophy: Selected Readings. Prentice Hall 390.
     
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  19.  59
    Jonathan Kaplan & Andrew Valls (2007). Housing Discrimination As a Basis for Black Reparations. Public Affairs Quarterly 21 (3):255-274.
    The renewed interest in the issue of black reparations, both in the public sphere and among scholars, is a welcome development because the racial injustices of the past continue to shape American society by disadvantaging African Americans in a variety of ways. Attention to the past and how it has shaped present-day inequality seems essential both to understanding our predicament and to justifying policies that would address and undermine racial inequality. Given this, any argument for policies designed to (...)
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  20.  43
    Nicolas Rost (2011). Human Rights Violations, Weak States, and Civil War. Human Rights Review 12 (4):417-440.
    This study examines the role of human rights violations as a harbinger of civil wars to come, as well as the links between repression, state weakness, and conflict. Human rights violations are both part of the escalating process that may end in civil war and can contribute to an escalation of conflict to civil war, particularly in weak states. The role of government repression and state weakness in leading to civil war is tested empirically. (...)
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  21.  11
    William B. Turner, The Racial Integration of Emory University: Ben F. Johnson, Jr., and the Humanity of Law.
    This article describes the racial integration of Emory University and the subsequent creation of Pre-Start, an affirmative action program at Emory Law School from 1966 to 1972. It focuses on the initiative of the Dean of Emory Law School at the time, Ben F. Johnson, Jr.. Johnson played a number of leadership roles throughout his life, including successfully arguing a case before the United States Supreme Court while he was an Assistant Attorney General of Georgia, promoting legislation to create Atlanta (...)
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  22.  1
    Carlo Ruzza (2014). Civil Society Actors and EU Fundamental Rights Policy: Opportunities and Challenges. Human Rights Review 15 (1):65-81.
    This paper examines how civil society actors in the EU utilize the political and legal opportunities provided by the EU’s fundamental rights policy to mobilize against discrimination, notably racism, and xenophobia. It emphasizes the multiple enabling roles that this policy provides to civil society associations engaged in judicial activism, political advocacy, and service delivery both at the EU and Member State levels, and assesses their effectiveness. It describes several factors that hinder the implementation of EU fundamental (...) policy and reviews the strategies of civil society to overcome them. It highlights the reluctance of parts of public opinion to combat ethnic prejudice, considers reactions against what at a time of crisis is perceived as a costly project of social regulation, and examines civil society responses. The data sources consist of interviews with bureaucratic and civil society actors at EU level. (shrink)
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  23.  3
    Adam Fairclough (2004). Thurgood Marshall's Pursuit of Equality Through Law. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 7 (4):177-199.
    Thurgood Marshall (1908?1993) profoundly shaped the direction and success of the American civil rights struggle. Joining the staff of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1936, he headed its Legal Defense and Educational Fund from 1939 until 1961, subsequently becoming a federal appeals court judge, Solicitor General, and Justice of the US Supreme Court. Marshall was more an egalitarian integrationist than a pluralist and deployed the law in pursuit of this moral objective. Although (...)
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  24. Elizabeth Anderson (2010). The Imperative of Integration. Princeton University Press.
    More than forty years have passed since Congress, in response to the Civil Rights Movement, enacted sweeping antidiscrimination laws in the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Fair Housing Act of 1968. As a signal achievement of that legacy, in 2008, Americans elected their first African American president. Some would argue that we have finally arrived at a postracial America, butThe Imperative of Integration indicates otherwise. Elizabeth (...)
     
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  25. E. Culpepper Clark (1995). The Schoolhouse Door: Segregation's Last Stand at the University of Alabama. Oxford University Press Usa.
    On June 11, 1963, in a dramatic gesture that caught the nation's attention, Governor George Wallace physically blocked the entrance to Foster Auditorium on the University of Alabama's campus. His intent was to defy Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach, sent on behalf of the Kennedy administration to force Alabama to accept court-ordered desegregation. After a tense confrontation, President Kennedy federalized the Alabama National Guard and Wallace backed down, allowing Vivian Malone and James Hood to become the first African Americans (...)
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  26.  50
    Giorgio Baruchello & Rachael Lorna Johnstone (2011). Rights and Value: Construing the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights as Civil Commons. Studies in Social Justice 5 (1):91-125.
    This article brings together the United Nations’ International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) and John McMurtry’s theory of value. In this perspective, the ICESCR is construed as a prime example of “civil commons,” while McMurtry’s theory of value is proposed as a tool of interpretation of the covenant. In particular, McMurtry’s theory of value is a hermeneutical device capable of highlighting: (a) what alternative conception of value systemically operates against the fulfilment of the rights (...)
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  27.  14
    Fernando Arlettaz (2013). Minority Rights in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights: Conceptual Considerations. Jurisprudence 20 (3):901-922.
    The article discusses the rights of minorities in the system of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. It establishes a conceptual distinction between universal rights, specific rights of minorities in general and specific rights of particular minorities. Universal rights correspond to all individuals (e,g,, “no one shall be subjected to torture”) or all groups of a certain class (e.g., “all families are entitled to protection”). Minority groups and their members are entitled (...)
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  28.  1
    Luke Wilcox (2010). Secularists and Islamists in Morocco: Prospects for Building Trust and Civil Society Through Human Rights Reform. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (20):3-25.
    In Morocco’s process of liberalization (and democratization), the dynamics between social actors defining themselves as “secular” and those labeled “Islamist” are critical. This paper probes the possibility of these actors transcending their frequent opposition and building mutual trust and “civil” interaction, thereby strengthening civil society and the possibility of continued reform in Morocco. Using Morocco’s recent Equity and Reconciliation Commission as an analytical tool, the paper focuses on the human rights arena as a potentially fruitful place for (...)
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  29. Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (1991). Reassessing Civil Rights.
     
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  30. Charles Vert Willie, Michael K. Grady & Richard O. Hope (1991). African-Americans and the Doctoral Experience Implications for Policy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  31.  17
    Sondra Harcourt & Mark Harcourt (2002). Do Employers Comply with Civil/Human Rights Legislation? New Evidence From New Zealand Job Application Forms. Journal of Business Ethics 35 (3):207-221.
    This study assesses the extent to which job application forms violate the New Zealand Human Rights Act. The sample for the study includes 229 job application forms, collected from a variety of large and small, public- and private-sector organizations that together employ approximately 200,000 workers. Two hundred and four or 88% of the job application forms contain at least one violation of the Act. One hundred and sixty five or 72% contain two or more and 140 or 61% contain (...)
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  32.  20
    Oritsegbubemi Anthony Oyowe (2014). An African Conception of Human Rights? Comments on the Challenges of Relativism. Human Rights Review 15 (3):329-347.
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  33.  2
    Mihaela Mudure (2010). From the Gypsies to the African Americans. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (4):58-74.
    This paper is an analysis of comparative multiculturalisms. Starting from the historical reality that both the Roma and the African-Americans were reified through slavery and discriminated against because of their racial visibility, the author analyses the position of the two groups in the Romanian, namely, the American society. The lead of the African-Americans in overcoming the racial stigma is explained by the author through: the opportunities offered by a powerful and consolidated democracy, and by the existence (...)
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  34.  35
    Ziad Swaidan, Scott J. Vitell & Mohammed Y. A. Rawwas (2003). Consumer Ethics: Determinants of Ethical Beliefs of African Americans. Journal of Business Ethics 46 (2):175-186.
    This study explores the ethical ideologies and ethical beliefs of African American consumers using the Forsyth ethical position questionnaire and the Muncy-Vitell consumer ethics questionnaire . The two dimensions of the EPQ were the independent constructs and the four dimensions of the MVQ were the dependent variables. In addition, this paper explores the consumer ethics of African Americans across four demographic factors . A sample of 315 African American consumers was used to explore these relationships. Results (...)
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  35.  50
    Troy W. Hartley (1995). Environmental Justice: An Environmental Civil Rights Value Acceptable to All World Views. Environmental Ethics 17 (3):277-289.
    In accordance with environmental injustice, sometimes called environmental racism, minority communities are disproportionately subjected to a higher level of environmental risk than other segments of society. Growing concern over unequal environmental risk and mounting evidence of both racial and economic injustices have led to a grass-roots civil rights campaign called the environmental justice movement. The environmental ethics aspects of environmental injustice challenge narrow utilitarian views and promote Kantian rights and obligations. Nevertheless, an environmentaljustice value exists in all (...)
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  36.  22
    Dwayne A. Tunstall (2007). 8. Why Violence Can Be Viewed as a Legitimate Means of Combating White Supremacy for Some African Americans. Radical Philosophy Today 2007:159-173.
    Philosophers often entertain positions that they themselves do not hold. This article is an example of this. While I do not advocate localized acts of violence to combat white supremacy, I think that it is worthwhile to explore why it might be theoretically justifiable for some African Americans to commit such acts of violence. I contend that acts of localized violence are at least theoretical justifiable for some African Americans from the vantage point of racial realism. (...)
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  37.  17
    Marilyn Fischer (2014). Addams on Cultural Pluralism, European Immigrants, and African Americans. The Pluralist 9 (3):38-58.
    addams wrote movingly about how significant her immigrant neighbors’ cultures were, both to the immigrants and to non-immigrant Americans. She lived in one of Chicago’s many densely populated immigrant districts, with Italians, Greeks, Russians, Poles, Bohemians, and Eastern European Jews in the immediate vicinity of Hull House.1 Through countless interactions with these neighbors, Addams developed the empirical knowledge base and the perceptual sensitivities with which to reflect on the role of culture in sustaining and enriching human and community life. (...)
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  38.  11
    Paul Gottfried (1996). On the Civil Rights Movement: Reply to Murray. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1996 (106):139-142.
    Hugh Murray's comments on the civil rights movement recall Marge Schott's badly received observations on the Nazi regime. Murray is also describing something that turned out badly but which he insists began well. Contrary to Murray and Dinesh D'Souza, whose book he reviews, the continuities of the Civil Rights Movement and affirmative action policies are more significant than its alleged turning points. Affirmative action as a practice goes back to the last year of the Johnson administration, (...)
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  39.  9
    Drucilla Byars (1996). Traditional African American Foods and African Americans. Agriculture and Human Values 13 (3):74-78.
    Traditional African American foods, also referred to as “soul food,” are often given a blanket label of “poor food choices.” The cultural value of these ethnic foods may be disregarded without sufficient study of their nutrient content. This study showed that of the various foods perceived as traditionally African American by the local sampled population, greens were the most often identified as such by 78% and the most frequently consumed (22%) by the subjects. 37% perceived chitterlings as a (...)
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  40.  19
    Alexinia Young Baldwin (2003). Understanding the Challenge of Creativity Among African Americans. Inquiry 22 (3):13-18.
    Creative activities in a classroom can often be mistaken for negligence of academic requirements. This is especially true for many African American students. Recognition of the mental processes used in the expression of creative behaviors should give teachers the opportunity to harness this creative energy to develop academic skills. This article draws upon a historical perspective of creativity and its relationship to this trait in African Americans. Although many of the behaviors listed are common in all ethnic (...)
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  41.  8
    V. Denise James (2014). Comments on Marilyn Fischer's "Addams on Cultural Pluralism, European Immigrants, and African Americans". The Pluralist 9 (3):66-71.
    marilyn fischer’s careful historiographical treatment of the ideas and life of Jane Addams deepens our understanding of Addams’s important work as a thinker and practitioner. The paper paints a picture of the ideological and sociological landscape of Addams’s world, paying close attention to the relationships Addams had with other prominent thinkers of the day, such as the African Americans W. E. B. Du Bois and Ida B. Wells-Barnett, as well as the pragmatist Josiah Royce. Fischer seems to have (...)
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  42.  24
    Melinda Vadas (1992). The Pornography / Civil Rights Ordinance V. The BOG: And the Winner Is...? Hypatia 7 (3):94 - 109.
    The Supreme Court dismissed the Pornography/Civil Rights Ordinance as an unconstitutional restriction of speech. The Court's dismissal itself violates the free speech of the proposers of the Ordinance. It is not possible for both pornographers to perform the speech act of making pornography and feminists to perform the speech act of proposing the Ordinance. I show that the speech act of proposing the Ordinance takes First Amendment precedence over the speech act of making pornography.
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  43.  6
    Lloyd L. Weinreb (1991). What Are Civil Rights? Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (2):1.
    For all the discussion and debate about civil rights, it is striking how little attention is given initially to the question of what civil rights are. There is no well-understood principle of inclusion or exclusion that defines the category. Nor is there an agreed list of civil rights, except perhaps a very short, avowedly nonexhaustive one, with rather imprecise entries. Yet, if the extension of the category of civil rights is uncertain, its (...)
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  44.  8
    Robert E. Emerick (1996). Mad Liberation: The Sociology of Knowledge and the Ultimate Civil Rights Movement. Journal of Mind and Behavior 17 (2):135-160.
    Mad liberation — the former mental patient self-help movement — is characterized in this paper as a true progressive social movement. A sociology of knowledge perspective is used to account for much of the research literature that argues, to the contrary, that self-help groups do not represent a true social movement. Based on the "myth of individualism" and the "myth of simplicity," the psychological literature on self-help has defined empowerment in self-help groups as an individual-change or therapeutic orientation. This paper, (...)
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  45.  7
    William C. Hine (1992). South Carolina's Challenge to Civil Rights: The Case of South Carolina State College, 1945–1954. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 9 (1):38-50.
    South Carolina State College was founded in 1896. As one of the Black institutions taking advantage of the Second Morrill Act of 1890, a large portion of the college's limited financial resources, its energies, and its programs were devoted to training students in agriculture, home economics, vocational trades, and in the education of teachers. These curriculums were considered appropriate for young Black men and women in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.When the civil rights movement began to (...)
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  46.  15
    Thomas C. Grey (1991). Civil Rights Vs. Civil Liberties: The Case of Discriminatory Verbal Harassment. Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (2):81.
    American liberals believe that both civil liberties and civil rights are harmonious aspects of a basic commitment to human rights. But recently these two clusters of values have seemed increasingly to conflict – as, for example, with the feminist claim that the legal toleration of pornography, long a goal sought by civil libertarians, actually violates civil rights as a form of sex discrimination. Here I propose an interpretation of the conflict of civil (...)
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  47.  12
    Marvin Lynn (2006). Race, Culture, and the Education of African Americans. Educational Theory 56 (1):107-119.
    In this essay, Marvin Lynn explores a range of perspectives on African American education, with particular focus on three works: Black American Students in an Affluent Suburb: A Study of Academic Disengagement, by social anthropologist John Ogbu; African‐Centered Pedagogy: Developing Schools of Achievement for African American Children, by teacher education expert Peter Murrell; and African American Literacies, by Elaine Richardson, professor of English and applied linguistics. Lynn draws on Charles Valentine's sociological framework for understanding culture in (...)
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  48.  10
    Mark Tushnet (1991). Change and Continuity in the Concept of Civil Rights: Thurgood Marshall and Affirmative Action. Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (2):150.
    In analyzing the development of the concept of civil rights since the adoption of the Fourteenth Amendment, two historical accounts seem available. According to the first account, the concept initially encompassed a relatively limited set of rights, associated with the ability of all citizens to engage in the productive activities of the economy and avail themselves of the protection of the legal system. Then the concept gradually expanded to include what had initially been thought of as political (...)
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  49.  6
    Richard A. Epstein (1991). Two Conceptions of Civil Rights. Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (2):38.
    I. What Vintage of Civil Rights? In this paper I wish to compare and contrast two separate conceptions of civil rights and to argue that the older, more libertarian conception of the subject is preferable to the more widely accepted version used in the modern civil rights movement. The first conception of civil rights focuses on the question of individual capacity. The antithesis of a person with civil rights is the (...)
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  50.  5
    J. Wasserman, M. A. Flannery & J. M. Clair (2007). Rasing the Ivory Tower: The Production of Knowledge and Distrust of Medicine Among African Americans. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (3):177-180.
    African American distrust of medicine has consequences for treatment seeking and healthcare behaviour. Much work has been done to examine acute events that have contributed to this phenomenon and a sophisticated bioethics discipline keeps watch on current practices by medicine. But physicians and clinicians are not the only actors in the medical arena, particularly when it comes to health beliefs and distrust of medicine. The purpose of this paper is to call attention not just to ethical shortcomings of the (...)
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