Search results for 'Agnes Mure Mackenzie' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Agnes Mure Mackenzie (1929). The Process of Literature. London, G. Allen & Unwin Ltd..score: 870.0
     
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  2. J. S. Mackenzie (1895). Mr. MacKenzie's Reply. International Journal of Ethics 5 (3):377-383.score: 180.0
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  3. Catriona Mackenzie & Natalie Stoljar (eds.) (2000). Relational Autonomy: Feminist Perspectives on Automony, Agency, and the Social Self. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    This collection of original essays explores the social and relational dimensions of individual autonomy. Rejecting the feminist charge that autonomy is inherently masculinist, the contributors draw on feminist critiques of autonomy to challenge and enrich contemporary philosophical debates about agency, identity, and moral responsibility. The essays analyze the complex ways in which oppression can impair an agent's capacity for autonomy, and investigate connections, neglected by standard accounts, between autonomy and other aspects of the agent, including self-conception, self-worth, memory, and the (...)
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  4. Matthew D. MacKenzie (2007). The Illumination of Consciousness: Approaches to Self-Awareness in the Indian and Western Traditions. Philosophy East and West 57 (1):40-62.score: 30.0
    : Philosophers in the Indian and Western traditions have developed and defended a range of sophisticated accounts of self-awareness. Here, four of these accounts are examined, and the arguments for them are assessed. Theories of self-awareness developed in the two traditions under consideration fall into two broad categories: reflectionist or other-illumination theories and reflexivist or self-illumination theories. Having assessed the main arguments for these theories, it is argued here that while neither reflectionist nor reflexivist theories are adequate as traditionally formulated (...)
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  5. Matthew MacKenzie (2010). Enacting the Self: Buddhist and Enactivist Approaches to the Emergence of the Self. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):75-99.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I take up the problem of the self through bringing together the insights, while correcting some of the shortcomings, of Indo–Tibetan Buddhist and enactivist accounts of the self. I begin with an examination of the Buddhist theory of non-self ( anātman ) and the rigorously reductionist interpretation of this doctrine developed by the Abhidharma school of Buddhism. After discussing some of the fundamental problems for Buddhist reductionism, I turn to the enactive approach to philosophy of mind and (...)
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  6. Matthew MacKenzie (2008). Self-Awareness Without a Self: Buddhism and the Reflexivity of Awareness. Asian Philosophy 18 (3):245 – 266.score: 30.0
    _In this paper, I show that a robust, reflexivist account of self-awareness (such as was defended by Dignamacrga and Dharmakīrti, most phenomenologists, and others) is compatible with reductionist view of persons, and hence with a rejection of the existence of a substantial, separate self. My main focus is on the tension between Buddhist reflexivism and the central Buddhist doctrine of no-self. In the first section of the paper, I give a brief sketch of reflexivist (...)
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  7. Catriona Mackenzie (1992). Abortion and Embodiment. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 70 (2):136 – 155.score: 30.0
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  8. Craig Mackenzie (1994). Reviews : Bonnie Honig, Political Theory and the Displacement of Politics. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1993. Paper $17.55, Xi + 269 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 7 (3):113-116.score: 30.0
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  9. Nicki Hedge & Alison Mackenzie (2012). Beyond Care? Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (2):192-206.score: 30.0
    Care is a feature of all of our lives, all of the time. An analysis of Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence reveals that care and caring permeate complex dimensions of life in and after school and we ask here, if, on some accounts, care can do the work required of it. Acknowledging the significance of her contribution to care, we focus on the work of Nel Noddings suggesting that she pays insufficient attention to other emotions implicated in the work of morally (...)
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  10. Catriona Mackenzie (2007). Bare Personhood? Velleman on Selfhood. Philosophical Explorations 10 (3):263 – 282.score: 30.0
    In the Introduction to Self to Self, J. David Velleman claims that 'the word "self" does not denote any one entity but rather expresses a reflexive guise under which parts or aspects of a person are presented to his own mind' (Velleman 2006, 1). Velleman distinguishes three different reflexive guises of the self: the self of the person's self-image, or narrative self-conception; the self of self-sameness over time; and the self as autonomous agent. Velleman's account of each of these different (...)
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  11. H. N., W. McD, Sidney Ball, W. D. Morrison, J. S. Mackenzie, J. Shawcross, B. C. & B. W. (1902). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 11 (43):402-417.score: 30.0
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  12. T. B., John Sime, W. H. Winch, W. Leslie Mackenzie, Joseph Rickaby, Norman Smith, M. L., Alfred W. Benn, John Edgar & J. Lewis McIntyre (1905). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 14 (56):552-567.score: 30.0
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  13. J. S. MacKenzie (1895). Book Review:Monism, as Connecting Religion and Science. Ernst Haeckel. [REVIEW] Ethics 5 (3):403-.score: 30.0
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  14. M. A., P. Leon, H. B. Acton, W. G. de Burgh, F. R. Tennant, H. R. Mackintosh, A. S., J. Wisdom, Rex Knight, F. C. S. Schiller, T. E. Jessop & J. S. Mackenzie (1934). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 43 (170):238-265.score: 30.0
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  15. Robin Mackenzie (2011). The Neuroethics of Pleasure and Addiction in Public Health Strategies Moving Beyond Harm Reduction: Funding the Creation of Non-Addictive Drugs and Taxonomies of Pleasure. Neuroethics 4 (2):103-117.score: 30.0
    We are unlikely to stop seeking pleasure, as this would prejudice our health and well-being. Yet many psychoactive substances providing pleasure are outlawed as illicit recreational drugs, despite the fact that only some of them are addictive to some people. Efforts to redress their prohibition, or to reform legislation so that penalties are proportionate to harm have largely failed. Yet, if choices over seeking pleasure are ethical insofar as they avoid harm to oneself or others, public health strategies should foster (...)
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  16. Catriona Mackenzie (2002). Critical Reflection, Self-Knowledge, and the Emotions. Philosophical Explorations 5 (3):186-206.score: 30.0
    Drawing on recent cognitive theories of the emotions, this article develops an account of critical reflection as requiring emotional flexibility and involving the ability to envisage alternative reasons for action. The focus on the role of emotions in critical reflection, and in agents' resistance to reflection, suggests the need to move beyond an introspective to a more social and relational conception of the process of reflection. It also casts new light on the intractable problem of explaining how oppressive socialisation impairs (...)
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  17. Catriona Mackenzie (2008). Relational Autonomy, Normative Authority and Perfectionism. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (4):512-533.score: 30.0
  18. A. M. Bodkin, T. Loveday, W. McD, W. H. Winch, David Morrison, W. Leslie Mackenzie, George Galloway, T. M. Forsyth, John Edgar & A. W. Benn (1908). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 17 (66):264-285.score: 30.0
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  19. Matthew D. Mackenzie (2004). Self-Awareness: Issues in Classical Indian and Contemporary Western Philosophy. Dissertation, University of Hawai'iscore: 30.0
    In this dissertation I critically engage and draw insights from classical Indian, Anglo-American, phenomenological, and cognitive scientific approaches to the topic of self-awareness. In particular, I argue that in both the Western and the Indian tradition a common and influential view of self-awareness---that self-awareness is the product of an act of introspection in which consciousness takes itself as an object---distorts our understanding of both self-awareness and consciousness as such. In contrast, I argue for the existence and primacy of pre-reflective self-awareness (...)
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  20. C. D. Broad, G. Galloway, Godfrey H. Thomson, W. Leslie Mackenzie, G. A. Johnston, M. L., Arthur Robinson, A. E. Taylor, L. J. Russell, W. D. Ross, R. M. MacIver, Herbert W. Blunt, A. Wolf, Helen Wodehouse & B. Bosanquet (1914). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 23 (90):274-306.score: 30.0
  21. Harold H. Joachim, S. F., W. Leslie MacKenzie, E. F. Stevenson & W. B. Pillsbury (1900). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 9 (34):267-279.score: 30.0
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  22. Craig Mackenzie (1998). The Choice of Criteria in Ethical Investment. Business Ethics 7 (2):81–86.score: 30.0
    How do ethical investment funds choose their ethical criteria? How intelligent is this process from an ethical point of view? This paper reports on his field work carried out as part of the Bath University ‘Morals and Money’ Project. After completing this research, Dr. Craig Mackenzie left academia to become ethics development officer at Friends Provident. He can be contacted at 15 Old Bailey, London, EC4M 7AP; c.mackenzie@stewardship.co.uk.
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  23. J. S. Mackenzie, H. Wildon Carr, Alan Dorward, Harold Jeffreys, H. R. Mackintosh, F. C. S. Schiller, A. E. Taylor, F. C. Bartlett, John Laird, I. A. Richards & C. W. Valentine (1923). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 32 (1):93-125.score: 30.0
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  24. J. S. MacKenzie (1911). Mind and Body. Mind 20 (80):489-506.score: 30.0
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  25. E. A. Menneer, L. T., Clement C. J. Webb, T. Loveday, R. R. Marett, W. Leslie MacKenzie, J. H. & C. A. F. Rhys Davids (1900). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 9 (35):405-422.score: 30.0
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  26. G. R. G. Mure (1975). Cause and Because in Aristotle. Philosophy 50 (193):356 - 357.score: 30.0
    Philosophy , October 1974, contains an article entitled ‘Aristotle's Four Becauses’, by Professor Max Hocutt, who contends that Aristotle's aitia means ‘a because’ or ‘an explanation’ rather than ‘a cause’ and should be translated accordingly. He argues that only Aristotle's efficient ‘cause’ is a cause in the English sense of the word, and that ‘Aristotle's theory of “causes” is simply an application of his theory of syllogistic to the analysis of scientific knowledge’ . Both contentions deserve a word.
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  27. Rachel Batchelor, Ania Bobrowicz, Robin Mackenzie & Alisoun Milne (2012). Challenges of Ethical and Legal Responsibilities When Technologies' Uses and Users Change: Social Networking Sites, Decision-Making Capacity and Dementia. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 14 (2):99-108.score: 30.0
    Successful technologies’ ubiquity changes uses, users and ethicolegal responsibilities and duties of care. We focus on dementia to review critically ethicolegal implications of increasing use of social networking sites (SNS) by those with compromised decision-making capacity, assessing concerned parties’ responsibilities. Although SNS contracts assume ongoing decision-making capacity, many users’ may be compromised or declining. Resulting ethicolegal issues include capacity to give informed consent to contracts, protection of online privacy including sharing and controlling data, data leaks between different digital platforms, and (...)
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  28. Geo Galloway, David Morrison, W. Leslie MacKenzie, F. C. S. Schiller, John Sime, T. B., John Edgar, W. McD, G. R. T. Ross, R. F. A. Hoernle, A. R. Brown & B. Russell (1906). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 15 (58):261-280.score: 30.0
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  29. J. Grossman & F. Mackenzie (2005). The Randomized Controlled Trial: Gold Standard or Merely Standard? Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48 (4):516-34.score: 30.0
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  30. Ian MacKenzie (2000). Improvisation, Creativity, and Formulaic Language. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2):173-179.score: 30.0
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  31. Catriona Mackenzie & Jackie Leach Scully (2007). Moral Imagination, Disability and Embodiment. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (4):335–351.score: 30.0
  32. Catriona Mackenzie & Kim Atkins (eds.) (2008). Practical Identity and Narrative Agency. Routledge.score: 30.0
    The essays collected in this volume address a range of issues that arise when the focus of philosophical reflection on identity is shifted from metaphysical to ...
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  33. Cameron MacKenzie (2013). Wittgenstein's Antiphilosophy by Alain Badiou (Review). Substance 42 (1):180-184.score: 30.0
    The appearance of Wittgenstein's Antiphilosophy provides the opportunity to deepen our understanding of Alain Badiou's groundbreaking work on the obsessive Austrian. Both thinkers mix high style with logical rigor and are recognized for having proposed radically different directions for philosophy.For decades, Wittgenstein has been seen as the great exemplar of the "linguistic turn" in philosophy. Badiou has repeatedly accused Wittgenstein of initiating a century of sophistic language games that have done little for philosophy other than isolate its discourse and drain (...)
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  34. Jim Mackenzie (1989). Reasoning and Logic. Synthese 79 (1):99 - 117.score: 30.0
    Gilbert Harman, in Logic and Reasoning (Synthese 60 (1984), 107–127) describes an unsuccessful attempt ... to develop a theory which would give logic a special role in reasoning. Here reasoning is psychological, a procedure for revising one''s beliefs. In the present paper, I construe reasoning sociologically, as a process of linguistic interaction; and show how both reasoning in the psychologistic sense and logic are related to that process.
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  35. J. S. Mackenzie (1914). The Meaning of Reality. Mind 23 (89):19-40.score: 30.0
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  36. S. H. Mellone, John Edgar, W. Leslie Mackenzie, C. A. F. Rhys Davids, P. E. Winter, G. Dawes Hicks, A. E. Taylor, J. L. McIntyre & A. W. Benn (1905). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 14 (54):272-283.score: 30.0
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  37. F. C. S. Schiller, H. F. Hallett, S. R., M. H. Carré, J. Drever, John Laird, A. C. Ewing, J. S. MacKenzie, S. N. Dasgupta, E. S. Waterhouse, W. D. Ross, V. W., M. A. & T. E. (1926). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 35 (137):98-119.score: 30.0
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  38. Mary Margaret Mackenzie (1982). Parmenides' Dilemma. Phronesis 27 (1):1 - 12.score: 30.0
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  39. J. S. Mackenzie (1894). Reply to Some Criticisms. International Journal of Ethics 4 (3):380-384.score: 30.0
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  40. F. C. S. Schiller, W. Leslie Mackenzie, P. E. Winter, M. D., T. B., W. J., H. A., D. M. & C. A. F. Rhys Davids (1907). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 16 (64):605-618.score: 30.0
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  41. J. S. Mackenzie (1929). Kalki, or the Future of Civilization. By S. Radhakrishnan. (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co. 1929. Pp. 96. Price 2s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 4 (14):281-.score: 30.0
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  42. Robin Mackenzie (2007). Regulating Reprogenetics: Strategic Sacralisation and Semantic Massage. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 15 (4):305-319.score: 30.0
    This paper forms part of the feminist critique of the regulatory consequences of biomedicine’s systematic exclusion of the role of women’s bodies in the development of reprogenetic technologies. I suggest that strategic use of notions of the sacred to decontextualise and delimit disagreement fosters this marginalisation. Here conceptions of the sacred and sacralisation afford a means by which pragmatic consensus over regulation may be achieved, through the deployment of a bricolage of dense images associated with cultural loyalties to solidify support (...)
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  43. Catriona MacKenzie (1993). Reason and Sensibility: The Ideal of Women's Self-Governance in the Writings of Mary Wollstonecraft. Hypatia 8 (4):35 - 55.score: 30.0
    It is standard in feminist commentaries to argue that Wollstonecraft's feminism is vitiated by her commitment to a liberal philosophical framework, relying on a valuation of reason over passion and on the notion of a sex-neutral self. I challenge this interpretation of Wollstonecraft's feminism and argue that her attempt to articulate an ideal of self-governance for women was an attempt to diagnose and resolve some of the tensions and inadequacies within traditional liberal thought.
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  44. J. S. MacKenzie (1916). Laws of Thought. Mind 25 (99):289-307.score: 30.0
  45. Adrian Mackenzie (2005). Problematising the Technological: The Object as Event? Social Epistemology 19 (4):381 – 399.score: 30.0
    The paper asks how certain zones of technical practice or technologies come to matter as "the Technological", a way of construing political change in terms of technical innovation and invention. The social construction of technology (SCOT) established that things mediate social relations, and that social practices are constantly needed to maintain the workability of technologies. It also linked the production, representation and use of contemporary technologies to scientific knowledge. However, it did all this at a certain cost. To understand something (...)
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  46. J. S. Mackenzie (1909). Moral Education: The Task of the Teacher. International Journal of Ethics 19 (4):399-418.score: 30.0
  47. Jim MacKenzie (2000). The Idea of Literacy. Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (2):209–228.score: 30.0
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  48. J. H. Muirhead, J. S. Mackenzie, S. Alexander & David G. Ritchie (1894). The Meaning of "Motive". International Journal of Ethics 4 (2):229-238.score: 30.0
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  49. Nimal Ratnesar & Jim Mackenzie (2006). The Quantitative-Qualitative Distinction and the Null Hypothesis Significance Testing Procedure. Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (4):501–509.score: 30.0
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  50. Catriona Mackenzie (2006). Imagining Other Lives. Philosophical Papers 35 (3):293-325.score: 30.0
    In his recent book Reflective Democracy, Robert Goodin argues that 'external-collaborative' models of democratic deliberation procedures need to be supplemented by 'internal-reflective' deliberation. The exercise of the moral imagination plays a central role in Goodin's account of 'democratic deliberation within'. By imaginatively putting ourselves in the place of a range of others, he argues, including those who maybe not be able to represent their own interests, we can make their points of view 'communicatively present' in deliberation. Goodin's argument emphasizes the (...)
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