Search results for 'Agnes Mure Mackenzie' (try it on Scholar)

999 found
Sort by:
  1. Agnes Mure Mackenzie (1929). The Process of Literature. London, G. Allen & Unwin Ltd..score: 290.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. J. S. Mackenzie (1895). Mr. MacKenzie's Reply. International Journal of Ethics 5 (3):377-383.score: 120.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Catriona Mackenzie & Natalie Stoljar (eds.) (2000). Relational Autonomy: Feminist Perspectives on Automony, Agency, and the Social Self. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    This collection of original essays explores the social and relational dimensions of individual autonomy. Rejecting the feminist charge that autonomy is inherently masculinist, the contributors draw on feminist critiques of autonomy to challenge and enrich contemporary philosophical debates about agency, identity, and moral responsibility. The essays analyze the complex ways in which oppression can impair an agent's capacity for autonomy, and investigate connections, neglected by standard accounts, between autonomy and other aspects of the agent, including self-conception, self-worth, memory, and the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Matthew MacKenzie (2010). Enacting the Self: Buddhist and Enactivist Approaches to the Emergence of the Self. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):75-99.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I take up the problem of the self through bringing together the insights, while correcting some of the shortcomings, of Indo–Tibetan Buddhist and enactivist accounts of the self. I begin with an examination of the Buddhist theory of non-self ( anātman ) and the rigorously reductionist interpretation of this doctrine developed by the Abhidharma school of Buddhism. After discussing some of the fundamental problems for Buddhist reductionism, I turn to the enactive approach to philosophy of mind and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Matthew D. MacKenzie (2007). The Illumination of Consciousness: Approaches to Self-Awareness in the Indian and Western Traditions. Philosophy East and West 57 (1):40-62.score: 30.0
    : Philosophers in the Indian and Western traditions have developed and defended a range of sophisticated accounts of self-awareness. Here, four of these accounts are examined, and the arguments for them are assessed. Theories of self-awareness developed in the two traditions under consideration fall into two broad categories: reflectionist or other-illumination theories and reflexivist or self-illumination theories. Having assessed the main arguments for these theories, it is argued here that while neither reflectionist nor reflexivist theories are adequate as traditionally formulated (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Matthew MacKenzie (2008). Self-Awareness Without a Self: Buddhism and the Reflexivity of Awareness. Asian Philosophy 18 (3):245 – 266.score: 30.0
    _In this paper, I show that a robust, reflexivist account of self-awareness (such as was defended by Dignamacrga and Dharmakīrti, most phenomenologists, and others) is compatible with reductionist view of persons, and hence with a rejection of the existence of a substantial, separate self. My main focus is on the tension between Buddhist reflexivism and the central Buddhist doctrine of no-self. In the first section of the paper, I give a brief sketch of reflexivist (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Catriona Mackenzie (1992). Abortion and Embodiment. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 70 (2):136 – 155.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Catriona Mackenzie (2007). Bare Personhood? Velleman on Selfhood. Philosophical Explorations 10 (3):263 – 282.score: 30.0
    In the Introduction to Self to Self, J. David Velleman claims that 'the word "self" does not denote any one entity but rather expresses a reflexive guise under which parts or aspects of a person are presented to his own mind' (Velleman 2006, 1). Velleman distinguishes three different reflexive guises of the self: the self of the person's self-image, or narrative self-conception; the self of self-sameness over time; and the self as autonomous agent. Velleman's account of each of these different (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. J. S. MacKenzie (1895). Book Review:Monism, as Connecting Religion and Science. Ernst Haeckel. [REVIEW] Ethics 5 (3):403-.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Robin Mackenzie (2011). The Neuroethics of Pleasure and Addiction in Public Health Strategies Moving Beyond Harm Reduction: Funding the Creation of Non-Addictive Drugs and Taxonomies of Pleasure. Neuroethics 4 (2):103-117.score: 30.0
    We are unlikely to stop seeking pleasure, as this would prejudice our health and well-being. Yet many psychoactive substances providing pleasure are outlawed as illicit recreational drugs, despite the fact that only some of them are addictive to some people. Efforts to redress their prohibition, or to reform legislation so that penalties are proportionate to harm have largely failed. Yet, if choices over seeking pleasure are ethical insofar as they avoid harm to oneself or others, public health strategies should foster (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Matthew D. MacKenzie, Self-Awareness: Issues in Classical Indian and Contermporary Western Philosophy.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Catriona Mackenzie (2008). Relational Autonomy, Normative Authority and Perfectionism. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (4):512-533.score: 30.0
  13. Catriona Mackenzie (2002). Critical Reflection, Self-Knowledge, and the Emotions. Philosophical Explorations 5 (3):186-206.score: 30.0
    Drawing on recent cognitive theories of the emotions, this article develops an account of critical reflection as requiring emotional flexibility and involving the ability to envisage alternative reasons for action. The focus on the role of emotions in critical reflection, and in agents' resistance to reflection, suggests the need to move beyond an introspective to a more social and relational conception of the process of reflection. It also casts new light on the intractable problem of explaining how oppressive socialisation impairs (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Craig Mackenzie (1998). The Choice of Criteria in Ethical Investment. Business Ethics 7 (2):81–86.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. G. R. G. Mure (1975). Cause and Because in Aristotle. Philosophy 50 (193):356 - 357.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Rachel Batchelor, Ania Bobrowicz, Robin Mackenzie & Alisoun Milne (2012). Challenges of Ethical and Legal Responsibilities When Technologies' Uses and Users Change: Social Networking Sites, Decision-Making Capacity and Dementia. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 14 (2):99-108.score: 30.0
    Successful technologies’ ubiquity changes uses, users and ethicolegal responsibilities and duties of care. We focus on dementia to review critically ethicolegal implications of increasing use of social networking sites (SNS) by those with compromised decision-making capacity, assessing concerned parties’ responsibilities. Although SNS contracts assume ongoing decision-making capacity, many users’ may be compromised or declining. Resulting ethicolegal issues include capacity to give informed consent to contracts, protection of online privacy including sharing and controlling data, data leaks between different digital platforms, and (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Catriona Mackenzie & Jackie Leach Scully (2007). Moral Imagination, Disability and Embodiment. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (4):335–351.score: 30.0
  18. Mary Margaret Mackenzie (1982). Parmenides' Dilemma. Phronesis 27 (1):1 - 12.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Catriona Mackenzie & Kim Atkins (eds.) (2008). Practical Identity and Narrative Agency. Routledge.score: 30.0
    The essays collected in this volume address a range of issues that arise when the focus of philosophical reflection on identity is shifted from metaphysical to ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jim MacKenzie (2000). The Idea of Literacy. Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (2):209–228.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Jim Mackenzie (1989). Reasoning and Logic. Synthese 79 (1):99 - 117.score: 30.0
    Gilbert Harman, in Logic and Reasoning (Synthese 60 (1984), 107–127) describes an unsuccessful attempt ... to develop a theory which would give logic a special role in reasoning. Here reasoning is psychological, a procedure for revising one''s beliefs. In the present paper, I construe reasoning sociologically, as a process of linguistic interaction; and show how both reasoning in the psychologistic sense and logic are related to that process.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Catriona Mackenzie (2006). Imagining Other Lives. Philosophical Papers 35 (3):293-325.score: 30.0
    In his recent book Reflective Democracy, Robert Goodin argues that 'external-collaborative' models of democratic deliberation procedures need to be supplemented by 'internal-reflective' deliberation. The exercise of the moral imagination plays a central role in Goodin's account of 'democratic deliberation within'. By imaginatively putting ourselves in the place of a range of others, he argues, including those who maybe not be able to represent their own interests, we can make their points of view 'communicatively present' in deliberation. Goodin's argument emphasizes the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Catriona Mackenzie (2007). Feminist Bioethics and Genetic Termination. Bioethics 21 (9):515–516.score: 30.0
  24. Adrian Mackenzie (2005). Problematising the Technological: The Object as Event? Social Epistemology 19 (4):381 – 399.score: 30.0
    The paper asks how certain zones of technical practice or technologies come to matter as "the Technological", a way of construing political change in terms of technical innovation and invention. The social construction of technology (SCOT) established that things mediate social relations, and that social practices are constantly needed to maintain the workability of technologies. It also linked the production, representation and use of contemporary technologies to scientific knowledge. However, it did all this at a certain cost. To understand something (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Nimal Ratnesar & Jim Mackenzie (2006). The Quantitative-Qualitative Distinction and the Null Hypothesis Significance Testing Procedure. Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (4):501–509.score: 30.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Catriona MacKenzie (1993). Reason and Sensibility: The Ideal of Women's Self-Governance in the Writings of Mary Wollstonecraft. Hypatia 8 (4):35 - 55.score: 30.0
    It is standard in feminist commentaries to argue that Wollstonecraft's feminism is vitiated by her commitment to a liberal philosophical framework, relying on a valuation of reason over passion and on the notion of a sex-neutral self. I challenge this interpretation of Wollstonecraft's feminism and argue that her attempt to articulate an ideal of self-governance for women was an attempt to diagnose and resolve some of the tensions and inadequacies within traditional liberal thought.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Matthew D. MacKenzie (2001). The Five Factors of Action and the Decentring of Agency in the Bhagavad Gtā. Asian Philosophy 11 (3):141 – 150.score: 30.0
    I will here analyse the five factors of action given in the Bhagavad Gtā, paying specific attention to the implications of this account for the Gtā's moral and soteriological psychologies. I argue that the Gtā's account of action constitutes a decentring of agency which paves the way for liberation. Further, while the ethics and moral psychology of the Gtā are often seen as similar to Kant's, I will argue that the decentring of agency in the Gtā places the liberated person (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Cameron MacKenzie (2013). Wittgenstein's Antiphilosophy by Alain Badiou (Review). Substance 42 (1):180-184.score: 30.0
    The appearance of Wittgenstein's Antiphilosophy provides the opportunity to deepen our understanding of Alain Badiou's groundbreaking work on the obsessive Austrian. Both thinkers mix high style with logical rigor and are recognized for having proposed radically different directions for philosophy.For decades, Wittgenstein has been seen as the great exemplar of the "linguistic turn" in philosophy. Badiou has repeatedly accused Wittgenstein of initiating a century of sophistic language games that have done little for philosophy other than isolate its discourse and drain (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. J. S. Mackenzie (1904). Book Review:Principia Ethica. George Edward Moore. [REVIEW] Ethics 14 (3):377-.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jim Mackenzie (2012). Evidence-Based Education Policy: What Evidence? What Basis? Whose Policy? – Edited by D. Bridges, P. Smeyers and R. Smith. [REVIEW] Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (1):117-119.score: 30.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jim Mackenzie (1990). Four Dialogue Systems. Studia Logica 49 (4):567 - 583.score: 30.0
    The paper describes four dialogue systems, developed in the tradition of Charles Hamblin. The first system provides an answer for Achilles in Lewis Carroll's parable, the second an analysis of the fallacy of begging the question, the third a non-psychologistic account of conversational implicature, and the fourth an analysis of equivocation and of objections to it. Each avoids combinatorial explosions, and is intended for real-time operation.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. P. T. Mackenzie (1969). The Analyticity of `Stealing'. Mind 78 (312):611-615.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jim Mackenzie (1993). What the Good Samaritan Didn't Know. Journal of Value Inquiry 27 (1):39-41.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Jim Mackenzie (2010). Plato – by Robin Barrow. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (4):501-503.score: 30.0
  35. Matthew MacKenzie (2008). Ontological Deflationism in Madhyamaka. Contemporary Buddhism 9 (2):197-207.score: 30.0
  36. J. Grossman & F. Mackenzie (2005). The Randomized Controlled Trial: Gold Standard or Merely Standard? Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48 (4):516-34.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. J. S. Mackenzie (1929). Kalki, or the Future of Civilization. By S. Radhakrishnan. (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co. 1929. Pp. 96. Price 2s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 4 (14):281-.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Matthew MacKenzie (2013). Enacting Selves, Enacting Worlds: On the Buddhist Theory of Karma. Philosophy East and West 63 (2):194-212.score: 30.0
    The concept of karma is one of the most general and basic for the philosophical traditions of India, one of an interconnected cluster of concepts that form the basic presuppositions of Indian philosophy. And like many general, pervasive, and basic philosophical concepts, the idea of karma exhibits both semantic complexity and a certain fluidity and open texture. That is, the concept may not have a determinate application in all possible cases, it can be fleshed out in quite different ways in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. W. Leslie Mackenzie (1910). Observations on the Case of Sally Beauchamp. Mind 19 (73):1-29.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Jim Mackenzie (2011). Positivism and Constructivism, Truth and 'Truth'. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):534-546.score: 30.0
    This paper is concerned with the reversal in meaning of the word positivism, which has come to mean ‘theory which assumes the existence of a world beyond our ideas’ whereas once it meant ‘theory which is agnostic about the existence of a world beyond our ideas', and with educational writers’ persistent mistakes in using quotation marks, as a consequence of this reversal.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. J. D. Mackenzie (1979). Question-Begging in Non-Cumulative Systems. Journal of Philosophical Logic 8 (1):117 - 133.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Craig Mackenzie (1994). Reviews : Bonnie Honig, Political Theory and the Displacement of Politics. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1993. Paper $17.55, Xi + 269 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 7 (3):113-116.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Mary Margaret Mackenzie (1988). The Virtues of Socratic Ignorance. Classical Quarterly 38 (02):331-.score: 30.0
  44. G. R. G. Mure (1949). The Organic State. Philosophy 24 (90):205 - 218.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Alan Lewis & Craig Mackenzie (2000). Support for Investor Activism Among U.K. Ethical Investors. Journal of Business Ethics 24 (3):215 - 222.score: 30.0
    An important goal of ethical investment is to influence companies to improve their ethical and environmental performance. The principal means that many ethical funds employ is passive market signalling, which may not, on its own, have a significant effect. A much more promising approach may be active engagement. This paper reports on a questionnaire study of a sample of 1146 ethical investors in order to assess whether U.K. ethical investors would support more activist ethical investment and whether they would be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Ian Mackenzie (1986). Gadamer's Hermeneutics and the Uses of Forgery. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 45 (1):41-48.score: 30.0
  47. Matthew MacKenzie (2007). Review of Shyam Ranganathan, Ethics and the History of Indian Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (10).score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Catriona Mackenzie (2009). Review of Moral Psychology, Volume 3. The Neuroscience of Morality. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (3):528 – 532.score: 30.0
  49. J. S. Mackenzie (1922). Book Review:Education and World Citizenship: An Essay Towards a Science of Education. James Clerk Maxwell Garnett. [REVIEW] Ethics 32 (4):445-.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 999