Search results for 'Agriculture' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
See also:
  1. Patricia Allen & Martin Kovach (2000). The Capitalist Composition of Organic: The Potential of Markets in Fulfilling the Promise of Organic Agriculture. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):221-232.score: 27.0
    Observers of agriculture and theenvironment have noted the recent remarkable growth ofthe organic products industry. Is it possible for thisgrowth in the organics market to contribute toprogressive environmental and social goals? From theperspective of green consumerism, the organics marketis a powerful engine for positive change because itpromotes greater environmental awareness andresponsibility among producers and consumers alike.Given its environmental benefits and its ability touse and alter capitalist markets, organic agricultureis currently a positive force for environmentalism.Still, there are contradictions between organic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Miguel A. Altieri, Nelso Companioni, Kristina Cañizares, Catherine Murphy, Peter Rosset, Martin Bourque & Clara I. Nicholls (1999). The Greening of the “Barrios”: Urban Agriculture for Food Security in Cuba. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):131-140.score: 27.0
    Urban agriculture in Cuba has rapidly become a significant source of fresh produce for the urban and suburban populations. A large number of urban gardens in Havana and other major cities have emerged as a grassroots movement in response to the crisis brought about by the loss of trade, with the collapse of the socialist bloc in 1989. These gardens are helping to stabilize the supply of fresh produce to Cuba's urban centers. During 1996, Havana's urban farms provided the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Erik Bryld (2003). Potentials, Problems, and Policy Implications for Urban Agriculture in Developing Countries. Agriculture and Human Values 20 (1):79-86.score: 27.0
    Urban agriculture has, forcenturies, served as a vital input in thelivelihood strategies of urban households inthe developing countries. As a response to theeconomic crises exacerbated by the structuraladjustment programs and increasing migration,urban agriculture has expanded rapidly withinthe last 20 years. An examination of thegeneral trends in urban agriculture reveals anumber of issues policy-makers in developingcountries should address to provide services toensure a sustainable behavior towards urbancultivation. Most important is the legalizationof urban agriculture as a step towards (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Laura Saldivar-Tanaka & Marianne E. Krasny (2004). Culturing Community Development, Neighborhood Open Space, and Civic Agriculture: The Case of Latino Community Gardens in New York City. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 21 (4):399-412.score: 27.0
    To determine the role Latino community gardens play in community development, open space, and civic agriculture, we conducted interviews with 32 community gardeners from 20 gardens, and with staff from 11 community gardening support non-profit organizations and government agencies. We also conducted observations in the gardens, and reviewed documents written by the gardeners and staff from 13 support organizations and agencies. In addition to being sites for production of conventional and ethnic vegetables and herbs, the gardens host numerous social, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Steven M. Schnell (2013). Food Miles, Local Eating, and Community Supported Agriculture: Putting Local Food in its Place. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (4):615-628.score: 27.0
    The idea of “food miles,” the distance that food has to be shipped, has entered into debates in both popular and academic circles about local eating. An oft-cited figure claims that the “average item” of food travels 1,500 miles before it reaches your plate. The source of this figure is almost never given, however, and indeed, it is a figure with surprisingly little grounding in objective research. In this study, I track the evolution of this figure, and the ways that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Henning Best (2008). Organic Agriculture and the Conventionalization Hypothesis: A Case Study From West Germany. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (1):95-106.score: 27.0
    The recent growth in organic farming has given rise to the so-called “conventionalization hypothesis,” the idea that organic farming is becoming a slightly modified model of conventional agriculture. Using survey data collected from 973 organic farmers in three German regions during the spring of 2004, some implications of the conventionalization hypothesis are tested. Early and late adopters of organic farming are compared concerning farm structure, environmental concern, attitudes to organic farming, and membership in organic-movement organizations. The results indicate that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Sonja Brodt, Gail Feenstra, Robin Kozloff, Karen Klonsky & Laura Tourte (2006). Farmer-Community Connections and the Future of Ecological Agriculture in California. Agriculture and Human Values 23 (1):75-88.score: 27.0
    While questions about the environmental sustainability of contemporary farming practices and the socioeconomic viability of rural communities are attracting increasing attention throughout the US, these two issues are rarely considered together. This paper explores the current and potential connections between these two aspects of sustainability, using data on community members’ and farmers’ views of agricultural issues in California’s Central Valley. These views were collected from a series of individual and group interviews with biologically oriented and conventional farmers as well as (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Kate Clancy (1997). 1996 Presidential Address to the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society. Agriculture and Human Values 14 (2):111-114.score: 27.0
    Concerns about values and caring in the USA are being widelyvoiced in many sectors of the society, including agriculture.The time seems right to bring new ideas about the ethics ofagriculture and eating into public discourse. The Society iswell situated to initiate the dialogue, and Paul Thompson'sbook {\it Spirit of the Soil} (1995) provides an excellentstarting point.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Laura B. DeLind (2002). Place, Work, and Civic Agriculture: Common Fields for Cultivation. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 19 (3):217-224.score: 27.0
    ``Civic agriculture'' identifies adiverse and growing body of food and farmingenterprises fitted to the needs of localgrowers, consumers, rural economies, andcommunities. The term lends shape andlegitimacy to development paradigms that existin opposition to the global,corporately-dominated food system. Civicagriculture also widens the scope of ag-relatedconcerns, moving away from a strictlymechanistic focus on production and capitalefficiency, and toward the more holisticreintegration of people in place. To date,researchers and practitioners have attendedclosely to the economic benefits of newmarketing arrangements and institutions (e.g.,value-added co-ops, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jessica R. Goldberger (2008). Non-Governmental Organizations, Strategic Bridge Building, and the “Scientization” of Organic Agriculture in Kenya. Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):271-289.score: 27.0
    This paper contributes to the growing social science scholarship on organic agriculture in the global South. A “boundary” framework is used to understand how negotiation among socially and geographically disparate social worlds (e.g., non-governmental organizations (NGOs), foreign donors, agricultural researchers, and small-scale farmers) has resulted in the diffusion of non-certified organic agriculture in Kenya. National and local NGOs dedicated to organic agriculture promotion, training, research, and outreach are conceptualized as “boundary organizations.” Situated at the intersection of multiple (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jill Harrison (2008). Lessons Learned From Pesticide Drift: A Call to Bring Production Agriculture, Farm Labor, and Social Justice Back Into Agrifood Research and Activism. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):163-167.score: 27.0
    I use the case of pesticide drift to discuss the neoliberal shift in agrifood activism and its implications for public health and social justice. I argue that the benefits of this shift have been achieved at the cost of privileging certain bodies and spaces over others and absolving the state of its responsibility to ensure the conditions of social justice. I use this critical intervention as a means of introducing several opportunities for strengthening agrifood research and advocacy. First, I call (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Maki Hatanaka, Jason Konefal & Douglas H. Constance (2012). A Tripartite Standards Regime Analysis of the Contested Development of a Sustainable Agriculture Standard. Agriculture and Human Values 29 (1):65-78.score: 27.0
    As concerns over the negative social and environmental impacts of industrial agriculture become more widespread, efforts to define and regulate sustainable agriculture have proliferated in the US. Whereas the USDA spearheaded previous efforts, today such efforts have largely shifted to Tripartite Standards Regimes (TSRs). Using a case study of the Leonardo Academy’s initiative to develop a US sustainable agriculture standard, this paper examines the standards-development process and efforts by agribusiness to influence the process. Specifically, we analyze how (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Maija Heimo, Alfred H. Siemens & Richard Hebda (2004). Prehispanic Changes in Wetland Topography and Their Implications to Past and Future Wetland Agriculture at Laguna Mandinga, Veracruz, Mexico. Agriculture and Human Values 21 (4):313-327.score: 27.0
    We report core stratigraphy and chronology that explains the diachronic history of the surface in a prehispanic wetland agricultural complex of planting platforms and canals at Mandinga, central Veracruz, Mexico. Using recognizable stratigraphic horizons, elevations of prehistoric surfaces were measured for the wetland prior to the construction of platforms and canals, immediately following construction, at the time of abandonment, and of the present-day surface. Significant topographic and hydrological changes are evident. We discuss our results in the light of prehispanic water (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. C. Clare Hinrichs & Rick Welsh (2003). The Effects of the Industrialization of US Livestock Agriculture on Promoting Sustainable Production Practices. Agriculture and Human Values 20 (2):125-141.score: 27.0
    US livestock agriculture hasdeveloped and intensified according to a strictproductionist model that emphasizes industrialefficiency. Sustainability problems associatedwith this model have become increasinglyevident and more contested. Traditionalapproaches to promoting sustainable agriculturehave emphasized education and outreach toencourage on-farm adoption of alternativeproduction systems. Such efforts build on anunderlying assumption that farmers areempowered to make decisions regarding theorganization and management of theiroperations. However, as vertical coordinationin agriculture continues, especially in theanimal agriculture sectors, this assumptionbecomes less valid. This paper examines how thechanging (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Kristina Hubbard & Neva Hassanein (2013). Confronting Coexistence in the United States: Organic Agriculture, Genetic Engineering, and the Case of Roundup Ready® Alfalfa. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):325-335.score: 27.0
    In agriculture, the principle of coexistence refers to a condition where different primary production systems can exist in the vicinity of each other, and can be managed in such a way that they affect each other as little as possible. Coexistence policies aim to ensure that farmers are able to freely grow the crops they choose—be they genetically engineered (GE), non-GE conventional, or organic. In the United States (US), the issue of coexistence has very recently come into sharp relief (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Valerie Imbruce (2007). Bringing Southeast Asia to the Southeast United States: New Forms of Alternative Agriculture in Homestead, Florida. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 24 (1):41-59.score: 27.0
    Immigrant farmers from Southeast Asia have brought knowledge of tropical fruit and vegetable production from their home countries to Homestead, Florida. They have developed a new style of farming, one that most closely resembles agricultural systems described as “homegardens.” Although biodiverse agricultural systems are generally thought to be commercially unviable, homegarden farmers successfully manage crop diversity as an economic strategy. By focusing on growing a mixture of specialty Southeast Asian herbs, fruits, and vegetables, the farmers have created their own economic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Harvey S. James Jr (2006). Sustainable Agriculture and Free Market Economics: Finding Common Ground in Adam Smith. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):427-438.score: 27.0
    There are two competing approaches to sustainability in agriculture. One stresses a strict economic approach in which market forces should guide the activities of agricultural producers. The other advocates the need to balance economic with environmental and social objectives, even to the point of reducing profitability. The writings of the eighteenth century moral philosopher Adam Smith could bridge the debate. Smith certainly promoted profit-seeking, private property, and free market exchange consistent with the strict economic perspective. However, his writings are (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Stewart Lockie (1998). Environmental and Social Risks, and the Construction of “Best-Practice” in Australian Agriculture. Agriculture and Human Values 15 (3):243-252.score: 27.0
    Amongst the environmental and social externalities generated by Australian agriculture are a number of risks both to the health and safety of communities living near sites of agricultural production, and to the end consumers of agricultural products. Responses to these potential risks – and to problems of environmental sustainability more generally – have included a number of programs to variously: define “best-practice” for particular industries; implement “Quality Assurance” procedures; and encourage the formation of self-help community “Landcare” groups. Taken together, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Damian M. Parr, Cary J. Trexler, Navina R. Khanna & Bryce T. Battisti (2007). Designing Sustainable Agriculture Education: Academics' Suggestions for an Undergraduate Curriculum at a Land Grant University. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 24 (4):523-533.score: 27.0
    Historically, land grant universities and their colleges of agriculture have been discipline driven in both their curricula and research agendas. Critics call for interdisciplinary approaches to undergraduate curriculum. Concomitantly, sustainable agriculture (SA) education is beginning to emerge as a way to address many complex social and environmental problems. University of California at Davis faculty, staff, and students are developing an undergraduate SA major. To inform this process, a web-based Delphi survey of academics working in fields related to SA (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Neil Ravenscroft, Niamh Moore, Ed Welch & Rachel Hanney (2013). Beyond Agriculture: The Counter-Hegemony of Community Farming. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (4):629-639.score: 27.0
    In this paper we seek to understand the interplay between increasingly widely held concerns about the hegemony of industrialized agriculture and the emergence of counter-hegemonic activities, such as membership of community supported agriculture (CSA) initiatives. Informed by Blackshaw’s (Leisure, Abingdon, Routledge, 2010) work on “liquid leisure,” we offer a new leisure-based conceptualization of the tactics of counter-hegemony, arguing in the process that food politics offers a rich site for new, transitional identity formation. Using a case study of a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Jennifer L. Wilkins (2009). Civic Dietetics: Opportunities for Integrating Civic Agriculture Concepts Into Dietetic Practice. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (1-2):57-66.score: 27.0
    When Thomas Lyson developed the concept of Civic Agriculture, he provided a useful framework for considering a range of distinct but related professional areas. One such profession is dietetics. Registered dietitians work in a broad range of professional settings, including academic, clinical, administrative, hospitality, food service, and consulting. Dietetic practice has traditionally and primarily been informed by advances in understanding of the role nutrients and food play in enhancing health and reducing chronic disease risk. With support from the American (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Jessica M. Bagdonis, C. Clare Hinrichs & Kai A. Schafft (2009). The Emergence and Framing of Farm-to-School Initiatives: Civic Engagement, Health and Local Agriculture. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (1-2):107-119.score: 27.0
    Interest in and initiation of farm-to-school (FTS) programs have increased in recent years, spurred on by converging public concerns about child obesity trends and risks associated with industrialization and distancing in the modern food system. A civic agriculture framework that more specifically considers civic engagement and problem solving offers insights about variations in the development and prospects for FTS programs. Drawing on comparative case studies of two emerging FTS initiatives in Pennsylvania—one in a rural setting and one in an (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Mora Campbell (1998). Dirt in Our Mouths and Hunger in Our Bellies: Metaphor, Theory-Making, and Systems Approaches to Sustainable Agriculture. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 15 (1):57-64.score: 27.0
    The metaphor of the food system,dominant in current research approaches to sustainableagriculture, mirrors the productionist paradigm, whichreduces our relationship to land and food to theproduction and consumption of commodities. Theenactment of the familiar values of nourishment andhospitality is what the goal of sustainableagriculture would amount to in terms of our day to daylived experience. The metaphor of an ’’earthen bowl‘‘ asa theory of food and agriculture can ’’embody‘‘ thesevalues such that broader change might be achievedthrough embracing the idea and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Michael S. Carolan (2006). Social Change and the Adoption and Adaptation of Knowledge Claims: Whose Truth Do You Trust in Regard to Sustainable Agriculture? [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 23 (3):325-339.score: 27.0
    This paper examines sustainable agriculture’s steady rise as a legitimate farm management system. In doing this, it offers an account of social change that centers on trust and its intersection with networks of knowledge. The argument to follow is informed by the works of Foucault and Latour but moves beyond this literature in important ways. Guided by and building upon earlier conceptual framework first forwarded by Carolan and Bell (2003, Environmental Values 12: 225–245), sustainable agriculture is examined through (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Janel M. Curry (2002). Care Theory and ``Caring'' Systems of Agriculture. Agriculture and Human Values 19 (2):119-131.score: 27.0
    Care Theory is a growing schoolof ethics that starts with the assumption ofthe relational nature of human beings. Incontrast, the dominant assumption of theautonomous view of human nature has made itdifficult to integrate ``relational'' aspects ofreality into the realm of political actionrelated to agriculture. Variables such ascommunity attachment, community vitality andrichness, and environmental ``fit'' cannot beincorporated into policy because such variablesare perceived to be tainted by ``attachment,''and compromise rational judgement. Feministagricultural theorists parallel Care Theory andhave the potential of extending (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Christoffel den Biggelaar & Murari Suvedi (2000). Farmers' Definitions, Goals, and Bottlenecks of Sustainable Agriculture in the North-Central Region. Agriculture and Human Values 17 (4):347-358.score: 27.0
    Since its inception in 1988, the SAREprogram has sponsored hundreds of projects to exploreand apply economically viable, environmentally sound,and socially acceptable farming systems. Recognizingthat researchers often collaborated with producers andthat producer interest in sustainable agriculture wasincreasing, SARE's North-Central Region began directlyfunding farmers and ranchers in 1992 to test their ownideas on sustainable agriculture. The present articleis based on data from the formative evaluation of thefirst five years (1992 to 1996) of the NCR-SAREProducer Grant Program. The evaluation used acombination (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Carrie Furman, Carla Roncoli, Donald R. Nelson & Gerrit Hoogenboom (2013). Growing Food, Growing a Movement: Climate Adaptation and Civic Agriculture in the Southeastern United States. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values:1-14.score: 27.0
    This article examines the role that civic agriculture in Georgia (US) plays in shaping attitudes, strategies, and relationships that foster both sustainability and adaptation to a changing climate. Civic agriculture is a social movement that attracts a specific type of “activist” farmer, who is linked to a strong social network that includes other farmers and consumers. Positioning farmers’ practices within a social movement broadens the understanding of adaptive capacity beyond how farmers adapt to understand why they do so. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Courtney M. Gallaher, John M. Kerr, Mary Njenga, Nancy K. Karanja & Antoinette M. G. A. WinklerPrins (2013). Urban Agriculture, Social Capital, and Food Security in the Kibera Slums of Nairobi, Kenya. Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):389-404.score: 27.0
    Much of the developing world, including Kenya, is rapidly urbanizing. Rising food and fuel prices in recent years have put the food security of the urban poor in a precarious position. In cities worldwide, urban agriculture helps some poor people gain access to food, but urban agriculture is less common in densely populated slums that lack space. In the Kibera slums of Nairobi, Kenya, households have recently begun a new form of urban agriculture called sack gardening in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Andrew Marshall (2000). Sustaining Sustainable Agriculture: The Rise and Fall of the Fund for Rural America. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):267-277.score: 27.0
    Sustainable agriculture has lately madesignificant inroads into US agricultural policydiscourse. An examination of the ``life cycle'' of theFund for Rural America, a component of the 1996 farmbill, provides an example of the complex and contestedways in which the goals of sustainable agriculture areadvocated, negotiated, and implemented at the level ofnational policy, in the context of the evolvingpolitical and institutional arrangements of Americanagricultural policy. The Fund, with its relativelylarge endowment of $100 million annually, and itsexplicit emphasis on alternative (...) research,is emblematic of both the growing politicaleffectiveness of the alternative agriculture movementand the increasing institutionalization of alternativeagriculture representatives in Federal agencies. Theuntimely demise of the Fund in the appropriationsprocess, however, illustrates the extent to whichcertain key spaces within the state remain outsidesustainable agriculture's broadening sphere ofinfluence. This suggests that while some aspects ofthe movement's organizing strategy are indeedeffective, some may need to be rethought in light ofthe experience with the FRA. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Anna Peterson (2000). Alternatives, Traditions, and Diversity in Agriculture. Agriculture and Human Values 17 (1):95-106.score: 27.0
    This review essay examines several recentbooks about agriculture, including two books on thelinks between cultural and biological diversity intraditional agriculture, two books on the US farmcrisis, and a collected volume examining globalaspects of agricultural restructuring andsustainability. Finally, a history of ``alternative''agriculture provides a framework for thinking aboutthe ways the different cases shed light on the complexrelations between tradition and innovation inagriculture. A historical perspective highlights theextent to which ``alternative'' is a relative term. Themonocrop, ``factory'' mode that dominate (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Antoinette Pole & Margaret Gray (2013). Farming Alone? What's Up with the “C” in Community Supported Agriculture. Agriculture and Human Values 30 (1):85-100.score: 27.0
    This study reconsiders the purported benefits of community found in Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). Using an online survey of members who belong to CSAs in New York, between November and December 2010, we assess members’ reasons for joining a CSA, and their perceptions of community within their CSA and beyond. A total of 565 CSA members responded to the survey. Results show an overwhelming majority of members joined their CSA for fresh, local, organic produce, while few respondents joined their (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jennifer Sumner (2005). Value Wars in the New Periphery: Sustainability, Rural Communities and Agriculture. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 22 (3):303-312.score: 27.0
    Sustainability has been the subject of prolonged debate within both academic and mainstream literature, rendered all the more heated because many of the disagreements come down to deep differences in values. These "value wars'' play out in decisions made about issues ranging from development and investment to livelihoods and agriculture. Using rural communities as the context for discussion, this article proposes new directions for this contested concept, based on the life code of values. These life values ground sustainability in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Amy Trauger, Carolyn Sachs, Mary Barbercheck, Kathy Brasier & Nancy Ellen Kiernan (2010). “Our Market is Our Community”: Women Farmers and Civic Agriculture in Pennsylvania, USA. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 27 (1):43-55.score: 27.0
    Civic agriculture is characterized in the literature as complementary and embedded social and economic strategies that provide economic benefits to farmers at the same time that they ostensibly provide socio-environmental benefits to the community. This paper presents some ways in which women farmers practice civic agriculture. The data come from in-depth interviews with women practicing agriculture in Pennsylvania. Some of the strategies women farmers use to make a living from the farm have little to do with food (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Marleen van de Kerkhof, Annemarie Groot, Marien Borgstein & Leontien Bos-Gorter (2010). Moving Beyond the Numbers: A Participatory Evaluation of Sustainability in Dutch Agriculture. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 27 (3):307-319.score: 27.0
    Environmental pollution, animal diseases, and food scandals have marked the agricultural sector in the Netherlands and elsewhere in the 1990s. The sector was high on the political and societal agenda and plans were developed to redesign the sector into a more sustainable direction. Generally, monitoring of the agricultural sector is done by means of quantitative indicators to measure social, ecological, and economic performance. To give more attention to the normative character of sustainable development, the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture, Nature, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Murray Bruges & Willie Smith (2008). Participatory Approaches for Sustainable Agriculture: A Contradiction in Terms? [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (1):13-23.score: 27.0
    This paper examines the adoption and application of a participatory approach to the transfer of scientific research to farmers with the objective of supporting government policies for sustainable agriculture. Detailed interviews with scientists and farmers in two case studies in New Zealand are used to identify the potential and constraints of such an approach. One case study involves Māori growers wishing to develop organic vegetable production; the other involves commercial wheat farmers who want to improve their profitability and face (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. David Campbell (2001). Conviction Seeking Efficacy: Sustainable Agriculture and the Politics of Co-Optation. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 18 (4):353-363.score: 27.0
    Proponents of sustainable agriculture seek deeply rooted social changes, but to advance this agenda requires political credibility and work with diverse partners. Asthe literature on political co-optation makesclear, the tension between conviction andcredibility is persistent and unavoidable; nota problem to be solved so much as a built-incondition of movement politics. Drawing on acase history of California's largestsustainable agriculture organization, astructural assessment is made of the strategicchoices facing movement leaders, organizationaltensions that accompany these choices, andperceived gains and losses. The (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Corinna Hawkes (2004). A Journey in and Out of American Agriculture. Reflections on Debt and Dispossession by Kathryn Marie Dudley (University of Chicago Press, 2000). Agriculture and Human Values 21 (4):413-418.score: 27.0
    I was optimistic of a new beginning in an open society when I came to America in 1999. Since then, I have indeed benefited from many aspects of American life. I have learned a lot – especially through my experience with small farms and farmers. But now, it's time to move on. And it was reading Debt and Dispossession, a book about American agriculture and human values, that crystallized in me why I wanted to leave. By telling the story (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Bryan J. Hubbell & Rick Welsh (1998). Transgenic Crops: Engineering a More Sustainable Agriculture? [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 15 (1):43-56.score: 27.0
    Transgenic crops currently available foruse potentially provide environmental benefits, suchas reduction in insecticide use and substitution ofless toxic for more toxic herbicides. These benefitsare contingent on a host of factors, such as thepotential for development of resistant pests,out-crossing to weedy relatives, and transgenic cropmanagement regimes. Three scenarios are used toexamine the potential sustainability of transgeniccrop technologies. These scenarios demonstrate thatexisting transgenic varieties, while potentiallyimproving the sustainability of agriculture relativeto existing chemical based production systems, fail inenabling a fully sustainable (...). Genetictraits that have a higher potential for promoting asustainable agriculture have been precluded fromdevelopment for a number of reasons. These include thelack of EPA and USDA regulatory policies thatexplicitly promote sustainable traits; the structureof the agricultural biotechnology industry, which isdominated by agricultural chemical companies; andpatent law and industry policies that proscribe farmhouseholds from saving transgenic seed and tailoringtransgenic crops to their local environmentalconditions – ecological, social, and economic. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Martin H. Lenihan & Kathryn J. Brasier (2009). Scaling Down the European Model of Agriculture: The Case of the Rural Environmental Protection Scheme in Ireland. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (4):365-378.score: 27.0
    Recent reforms of the Common Agricultural Policy have led to much discussion of the European multifunctional model of agriculture in both policy and academic circles. Accordingly, European agriculture provides numerous social and environmental benefits and as a result should be supported through a system of payments which directly target those benefits. The agri-environmental measures specified under pillar II of the Common Agricultural Policy are supposed to exemplify the multifunctional model of agriculture, and the macro-level debates surrounding the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Aimee Shreck, Christy Getz & Gail Feenstra (2006). Social Sustainability, Farm Labor, and Organic Agriculture: Findings From an Exploratory Analysis. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):439-449.score: 27.0
    Much of the attention by social scientists to the rapidly growing organic agriculture sector focuses on the benefits it provides to consumers (in the form of pesticide-free foods) and to farmers (in the form of price premiums). By contrast, there has been little discussion or research about the implications of the boom in organic agriculture for farmworkers on organic farms. In this paper, we ask the question: From the perspective of organic farmers, does “certified organic” agriculture encompass (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Betty L. Wells & Shelly Gradwell (2001). Gender and Resource Management: Community Supported Agriculture as Caring-Practice. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 18 (1):107-119.score: 27.0
    Interviews with Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) growers in Iowa, a majority of whom are women, shed light on the relationship between gender and CSA as a system of resource management. Growers, male and female alike, are differentiated by care and caring-practices. Care-practices, historically associated with women, place priority on local context and relationships. The concern of these growers for community, nature, land, water, soil, and other resources is manifest in care-motives and care-practices. Their specific mix of motives differs: providing (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Karl S. Zimmerer (2003). Just Small Potatoes (and Ulluco)? The Use of Seed-Size Variation in “Native Commercialized” Agriculture and Agrobiodiversity Conservation Among Peruvian Farmers. Agriculture and Human Values 20 (2):107-123.score: 27.0
    Farmers of the Peruvian Andesmake use of seed-size variation as a source offlexibility in the production of ``nativecommercial'' farmer varieties of Andeanpotatoes and ulluco. In a case study of easternCuzco, the use of varied sizes of seed tubers isfound to underpin versatile farm strategiessuited to partial commercialization (combinedwith on-farm consumption and the next season'sseed). Use of seed-size variation also providesadaptation to diverse soil-moistureenvironments. The importance and widespread useof seed-size variation among farmers isdemonstrated in the emphasis and consistency oflinguistic expressions about (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Holger Kirchmann (1994). Biological Dynamic Farming — an Occult Form of Alternative Agriculture? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 7 (2):173-187.score: 25.0
    An analysis of the theory of biodynamic farming is presented. The founder of biological dynamic agriculture, the Austrian Rudolf Steiner, Ph.D., (1861–1925), introduced methods of preparation and use of eight compounds forming the nucleus of his agricultural theory. His instructions were based on insights and inner visions from spiritualistic exercises and not on agricultural experiments. His purpose was to show mankind a form of agriculture that enables not only the production of healthy foods but also the achievement of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Martha L. Crouch (1995). Biotechnology is Not Compatible with Sustainable Agriculture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (2):98-111.score: 25.0
    Biotechnology increases commercialization of food production, which competes with food for home use. Most people in the world grow their own food, and are more secure without the mediation of the market. To the extent that biotechnology enhances market competitiveness, world food security will decrease. This instability will result in a greater gap between rich and poor, increasing poverty of women and children, less ability and incentive to protect the environment, and greater need for militarization to maintain order. Therefore, biotechnology (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Michael C. Appleby (2005). Sustainable Agriculture is Humane, Humane Agriculture is Sustainable. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (3):293-303.score: 25.0
    Procedures that increase the sustainability of agriculture often result in animals being treated more humanely:both livestock in animal and mixed farming and wildlife in arable farming. Equally, procedures ensuring humane treatment of farm animals often increase sustainability, for example in disease control and manure management. This overlap between sustainability and humaneness is not coincidental. Both approaches can be said to be animal centered, to be based on the fact that animal production is primarily a biological process. Proponents of both (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Laura B. Delind & Jim Bingen* (2008). Place and Civic Culture: Re-Thinking the Context for Local Agriculture. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (2):127-151.score: 25.0
    This article considers the qualitative concept of place – what it means, how it feels, how it is expressed, and how it is managed across time and space as (1) the appropriate context within which to study and promote local agriculture and (2) the locus of relationships, both cultural and political, that prefigure a local civic culture. It argues that civic as a description of local food and farming is conceptually and practically shallow in the absence of our ability (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Charles V. Blatz (1992). Ethics, Ecology and Development: Styles of Ethics and Styles of Agriculture. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 5 (1):59-85.score: 25.0
    This paper proposes to test the ethical acceptability of four styles of agricultural resource management: (1) contemporary industrial integrated systems agriculture, (2) modern industrial input dependent agriculture, (3) continuous traditional agriculture and (4) non-continuous (or swidden) traditional agriculture. The test of ethical acceptability is whether or not these styles of agricultural resource management embrace or are even compatible with that pattern of practical reasoning and interaction among ethical agents which we have independent theoretic grounds for preferring. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Christian J. Peters (2000). Genetic Engineering in Agriculture: Who Stands to Benefit? [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 13 (3-4):313-327.score: 25.0
    The use of genetic engineering inagriculture has been the source of much debate. Todate, arguments have focused most strongly on thepotential human health risks, the flow of geneticmaterial to related species, and ecologicalconsequences. Little attention appears to have beengiven to a more fundamental concern, namely, who willbe the beneficiaries of this technology?Given the prevalence of chronic hunger and thestark economics of farming, it is arguable thatfarmers and the hungry should be the mainbeneficiaries of agricultural research. However, theapplication of genetic engineering (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Melania Salazar-Ordóñez & Samir Sayadi (2011). Environmental Care in Agriculture: A Social Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (3):243-258.score: 25.0
    At its beginning, the European Union’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) did not include measures to guide farmers in preserving ecosystems. At the same time, the social context on the 1960s and 1970s did not encourage environmental care to become a priority. Since the 1980s, new social concern expressed alarm over ecology, recognizing that agriculture can pollute. These social changes moved the CAP to add measures that linked agriculture and environment. In order to study if the EU decision-makers have (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Rajiv K. Sinha (1997). Embarking on the Second Green Revolution for Sustainable Agriculture in India: A Judicious Mix of Traditional Wisdom and Modern Knowledge in Ecological Farming. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (2):183-197.score: 25.0
    The Green Revolution in India which was heralded in the 1960‘s was a mixed blessing. Ambitious use of agro-chemicals boosted food production but also destroyed the agricultural ecosystem. Of late Indian farmers and agricultural scientists have realized this and are anxious to find alternatives – perhaps a non-chemical agriculture – and have even revived their age-old traditional techniques of natural farming. Scientists are working to find economically cheaper and ecologically safer alternatives to agro-chemicals. Blue-Green Algae Biofertilizers, Earthworm Vermicomposts (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000