Search results for 'Ahimsa' (try it on Scholar)

52 found
Order:
  1. Nand Kishore Acharya (ed.) (2010). Ahiṃsā-Viśvakośa. Bhaṃvaralāla-Kāntābāī Jaina Malṭīparpaza Phāuṇḍeśana.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Nathaniel Altman (1988). The Nonviolent Revolution: A Comprehensive Guide to Ahimsa, the Philosophy of Dynamic Harmlessness. Element Books.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. A. Chakravarti (1957). The Religion of Ahimsa: The Essence of Jaina Philosophy and Ethics. Varthamanan Pathipagam.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Lokesh Chandra (1981). Vibrations of Ahimsa in China. International Academy of Indian Culture.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Indu Mala Ghosh (1988). Ahiṁsā, Buddhist and Gandhian. Balaji Enterprises.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. George Kotturan (1973). Ahimsa: Gautama to Gandhi. New Delhi,Sterling Publishers.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Kanhaiyālāla Loṛhā (2011). Positive Non-Violence: Canonical and Practical Bases of Compassionate Aspects of Ahimsā. Prakrit Bharati Academy.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Meeta Nath (2011). Ahiṁsā: Based on Buddhism and Gandhism. Vidyanidhi Prakashan.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Shree Chand Rampuria (1947). The Cult of Ahimsa. Sri Jain Swetamber Terapanthi Mahasabha.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Subhadra, Dāmodara Śāstrī & Maheśa Jaina (eds.) (2004). Ahiṃsā-Viśvakośa: Ahiṃsā Ke Dārśanika, Dhārmika, Va Sāṃskr̥tika Svarūpoṃ Ko Vyākhyāyita Karane Vāle Prācīna Śāstrīya Viśiṣṭa Sandarbhoṃ Ka Saṅkalana. Yūnivarsiṭī Pablikeśana.
    1. Vaidika/Brāhmaṇa saṃskr̥ti -- 2. Jaina saṃskr̥ti.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Unto Tähtinen (1976). Ahiṃsā: Non-Violence in Indian Tradition. Rider.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Koshelya Walli (1974). The Conception of Ahiṁsā in Indian Thought, According to Sanskrit Sources. Bharata Manisha.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  25
    John E. Cort (2000). "Intellectual Ahiṃsā" Revisited: Jain Tolerance and Intolerance of Others. Philosophy East and West 50 (3):324-347.
    It has been widely proposed that the Jain logical methods of linguistic analysis collectively known as anekāntavāda (manypointedness) are an extension of the Jain ethical imperative of ahiṃsā (non-harm) into philosophy as a form of intellectual tolerance and relativity--described by several scholars as "intellectual ahiṃsā"--whose genealogy and development over the past sixty-five years are given in detail. It is shown how Jains used anekāntavāda to expose the relative truth of non-Jain metaphysics, while arguing that only Jain metaphysics, which alone is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  8
    Prabhat Misra (1998). Reflections on Ahimsa: A Practical Approach. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 25 (2):191-204.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  12
    Cathy Byrne (2006). Would A Buddhist Freeze A Cane Toad?An Exploration Of The Modern Phenomenon Of Environmental Buddhism And The Ethics Related To The Doctrine Of Ahimsa (Non-Harming). Contemporary Buddhism 7 (2):117-127.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  29
    Nick Gier, Gandhi, Ahimsa, and the Self.
    (Gandhi Marg 15:1 [April-June, 1993], pp. 24-36) Individuality is and is not even as each drop in the ocean is an individual and is not. It is not because apart from the ocean it has no existence. It is because the ocean has no existence if the drop has not, i.e., has no individuality. They are beautifully interdependent. And if this is true of the physical law, how much more so of the spiritual world!
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  11
    Nicholas F. Gier (1995). Ahimsa, the Self, and Postmodernism. International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (1):71-86.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  2
    Cyril Desbruslais (2001). Gandhiji's Ahimsa - Viable Strategy for Liberation Today? Disputatio Philosophica 3 (1):131-146.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  4
    Cedomil Veljacic (1985). The Place of Ahimsa in Buddhism and Jainism (in Yugoslavian). Filozofska Istrazivanja 13:297-308.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  1
    Michael W. Fox (1993). Ahimsa (Noninjury) Revisited. Between the Species 9 (3):8.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  1
    Alok Tandon (2002). Anekantavada and Ahimsa: A Framework for Interreligious Dialogue. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 29 (1):105-116.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  1
    Augustine Thottakara (2002). RTA Through Ahimsa: A Gandhian Interpretation. Journal of Dharma 27:327-348.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  2
    Rajlaxmi Debi Bhattacharya (1998). Musings on the Concept of Ahimsa (Non-Violence): On'Reflections on Ahimsa: A Practical Approach'by Prabhat Misra. Indian Philosophical Quarterly: Journal of the Department of Philosophy, University of Poona 25:527-531.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  5
    Manfred B. Steger (2006). Searching for Satya Through Ahimsa: Gandhi's Challenge to Western Discourses of Power. Constellations 13 (3):332-353.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Sp Agarwal (1991). Lokasamgraha and Ahimsa in The'bhagavad Gita'. Journal of Dharma 16 (3):255-268.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. S. J. Carri (2003). Ahimsa and Indian Secularism. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 30 (2):291-326.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Leela Gandhi (2010). Ahimsa and the Metaphysics of Hon-Violence. In J. Sharma A. Raguramaraju (ed.), Grounding Morality. Routledge 160.
  28. P. S. Jaini (1991). Animals as Agents in Ahimsa Action and Spiritual Life. Journal of Dharma 16 (3):269-281.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Prabhat Misra & Non-Violence as an Ideal (1998). Discussion-I Musings on the Concept of Ahimsa (Non-Violence). Indian Philosophical Quarterly 25 (2-4):527.
  30.  11
    Ryan P. McLaughlin (2012). Non-Violence and Nonhumans: Foundations for Animal Welfare in the Thought of Mohandas Gandhi and Albert Schweitzer. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (4):678-704.
    This essay explores how the principles of ahimsa and reverence for life provide a foundation for animal welfare in the thought of Mohandas Gandhi and Albert Schweitzer, respectively. This exploration unfolds through a consideration of the contextual background of both thinkers, the scope of life to which they apply their respective principles, and both the ethical ramifications and limitations of this application. Within this common framework, the author delineates the striking commonalities and the significant disparities between Gandhi and Schweitzer. (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  15
    Bindu Puri (2011). The Self and the Other: Liberalism and Gandhi. Philosophia 39 (4):673-698.
    This paper makes an attempt to philosophically re-construct what I have termed as a fundamental paradox at the heart of deontological liberalism. It is argued that liberalism attempts to create the possibilities of rational consensus and of bringing people together socially and politically by developing methodologies which overcome the divisive nature of essentially parochial substantive conceptions of the good. Such methodologies relying on the supposed universally valid dictates of reason and notions of procedural rationality proceed by disengaging men from the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  32. Małgorzata Glinicka (2015). THE FATE OF MISGUIDED SOULS: KUNDAKUNDA's AND AMRTACHANDRA-SŪRI's PESPECTIVE. Hybris. Revista de Filosofía (29):150-171.
    THE FATE OF MISGUIDED SOULS: KUNDAKUNDA’S AND AMRTACHANDRA-SŪRI’S PESPECTIVE The article is aimed at juxtaposition of two Jaina thinkers’ concepts related to the status of living beings mired with delusion, i.e. Kundakunda’s (2nd c. CE) and Amṛtachandra-sūri’s (10th c. CE) perspective according to Samaya-sāra of the former and Puruṣârthasiddhy- upāya of the latter. According to the Jaina philosophy an individual soul (jīva) attains respective stages of spiritual development traversing the whole scope spread between mithyātva (“falsity”) and samyaktva (“perfection”) tiers. Each (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Nesy Daniel (2008). Indian Ethics and Contemporary Bioethical Issues. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 3:11-17.
    Two fundamental problems in all thought can be identified: One, life and world affirmation and second, life and world negation. Indian approach is characterized as the second and hence it is claimed that moral problems have not been persistently pursued and successfully tackled in India. Points like the advaita concept of liberation, law of karma, the system of social stratification, stages of life and duties associated with them are picked up to show that theIndian system is ethically bankrupt. But along (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  15
    Joan Marques (2012). Consciousness at Work: A Review of Some Important Values, Discussed From a Buddhist Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):27-40.
    This article reviews the element of consciousness from a Buddhist and a non-Buddhist (Western) perspective. Within the Buddhist perspective, two practices toward attaining expanded and purified consciousness will be included: the Seven-Point Mind Training and Vipassana. Within the Western perspective, David Hawkins’ works on consciousness will be used as a main guide. In addition, a number of important concepts that contribute to expanded and purified consciousness will be presented. Among these concepts are impermanence, karma, non-harming (ahimsa), ethics, kindness and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  35. Nick Gier, Gandhi, Character Consequentialism, and the Virtue of Nonviolence.
    This paper has been extracted from a book manuscript that attempts to interpret Gandhi’s ethics of nonviolence ahimsa) in terms of virtue theory. The first section addresses the issue of virtue theory’s relationship to consequentialism and concludes that there is no way to avoid the fact that the virtues developed because of their consequences. Therefore, I will join Gandhi’s virtue ethics with P. J. Ivanhoe’s character consequentialism. Particularly significant in distinguishing utilitarianism from virtue theory is the relationship of means (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  54
    Vinit Haksar (2012). Violence in a Spirit of Love: Gandhi and the Limits of Non-Violence. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (3):303-324.
    The paper considers how Mahatma Gandhi?s Law of Ahimsa (or non-violence) can be reconciled with the necessity of violence; some of the strategies that Gandhi adopts in response to this problem are critically examined. Gandhi was willing to use (outward) violence as an expedience (in the sense of necessity), but he was opposed to using non-violence as an expedience. There are two versions of Gandhi?s doctrine. He makes a distinction between outward violence and inner violence. Both versions grant that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  7
    Mathana Amaris Fiona Sivaraman & Siti Nurani Mohd Noor (2016). Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Ethical Views of Buddhist, Hindu and Catholic Leaders in Malaysia. Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (2):467-485.
    Embryonic Stem Cell Research raises ethical issues. In the process of research, embryos may be destroyed and, to some, such an act entails the ‘killing of human life’. Past studies have sought the views of scientists and the general public on the ethics of ESCR. This study, however, explores multi-faith ethical viewpoints, in particular, those of Buddhists, Hindus and Catholics in Malaysia, on ESCR. Responses were gathered via semi-structured, face-to-face interviews. Three main ethical quandaries emerged from the data: sanctity of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  4
    Christopher G. Framarin (2011). The Value of Nature in Indian (Hindu) Traditions. Religious Studies 47 (3):285 - 300.
    Many authors claim that certain Indian (Hindu) texts and traditions deny that nature has intrinsic value. If nature has value at all, it has value only as a means to mokṡa (liberation). This view is implausible as an interpretation of any Indian tradition that accepts the doctrines of ahiṁsā (non-harm) and karma. The proponent must explain the connection between ahiṁsā and merit by citing the connection between ahiṁsā and mokṡa: ahiṁsā is valuable, and therefore produces merit, because ahiṁsā is instrumentally (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  36
    Nicholas F. Gier (2003). Nonviolence as a Civic Virtue: Gandhi and Reformed Liberalism. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 7 (1-3):75-97.
    Peace is the primary public good. --James K. Galbraith Somehow or other the wrong belief has taken possession of us that ahimsa is preeminently a weapon for individuals and its use should, therefore, be limited to that sphere. In fact this is not the case.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  15
    Nikita Dhawan (2006). On the (Im)Possibility of Non-Violent Resistance in Violent Times. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 2:257-262.
    Anti-essentialism, antiuniversalism, anti-foundationalism, fragmentation of subjectivity, pluralization of truths are feared to entail the danger of forfeiture of possibilities for critical counter discourses. But the deconstruction of categories is not inevitably the death of politics; rather, the postmodernist intervention of canonical power /knowledge alliances facilitates the recovery of "other" strategies of resistance concerning world problems from "nonconventional" sources that have hitherto been invalidated by mainstream discourses. Thus the crisis triggered by postmodern critique could hold immense opportunities for new configurations of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  7
    Knut A. Jacobsen (1994). The Institutionalization of the Ethics of “Non-Injury” Toward All “Beings” in Ancient India. Environmental Ethics 16 (3):287-301.
    The principle of non-injury toward all living beings (ahimsā) in India was originally a rule restraining human interaction with the natural environment. I compare two discourses on the relationship between humans and the natural environment in ancient India: the discourse of the priestly sacrificial cult and the discourse of the renunciants. In the sacrificial cult, all living beings were conceptualized as food. The renunciants opposed this conception and favored the ethics of non-injury toward all beings (plants, animals, etc.), which meant (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42.  7
    Kazuyoshi Hotta (2008). On Jainism and its Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:85-90.
    Jainism is characterized by an observance of non-violence (ahimsa) and asceticism (tapas). In the field of philosophy, it is marked by the doctrine of manifold aspects (anekantavada). The purpose of this study is to explore the inseparable connection between Jainism as a religion and as a philosophy. The first chapterdescribes the position of philosophical thinking in Jainism, while the second examines the doctrine of manifold aspects, which has become synonymous with Jainism. These exploration makes it clear that most of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  17
    John M. Koller (2000). Syādvāda as the Epistemological Key to the Jaina Middle Way Metaphysics of Anekāntavāda. Philosophy East and West 50 (3):400-407.
    An analysis of the Jain metaphysics of non-absolutism (anekāntavāda) shows how the epistemological theory of points of view (nayavāda) and the sevenfold schema of predication (saptabhaṅgī) provide a foundation for the central Jain principle of nonviolence (ahiṃsā).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  7
    Krishna Mani Pathak (2008). Gandhian Formula of Harmony and Peace. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 33:45-51.
    Gandhi’s writings on moral issues propose an easiest formula to the world to establish harmony and peace in the global society. In a world where people are confronting a psychological fear of sudden terror and violence, the Gandhian formula of ‘non-violence (ahimsa) as a means’ to form a perfect harmonious world is getting strong attention of the world-community. Truth and non-violence are the two most valuable ingredients of Gandhian moral thoughts. For him, Truth or God is the end and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  2
    N. Jain (2011). Panchsheela Model of Leadership: A Model for Organizational Survival and Growth. Journal of Human Values 17 (1):43-61.
    In the realm of Indian philosophical speculation, the contribution of Jainism is significant. As we are searching for effective leadership in organizations, we can get insights from Jaina scriptures. One such model of leadership is Panchsheela, which is the fundamental principle of Jainism. ‘Panchsheela’ means five principles or vows which form a practical code of conduct for a leader in an organization. These five principles also known as Panchmahavrata are Satya, Ahimsa, Asteya, Aparigraha and Brahmacharaya. If a leader follows (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  2
    Gail Crippen, Rose Lemberg, Margaret Wehinger, John Stockwell, Stephen Kaufman, Clay Lancaster, Charles R. Magel, Ruby C. Morgan, Steve Zawistowski & Ahimsa FOlDldation (forthcoming). Mary Starin. Between the Species.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  5
    David L. Perry, Ethical Issues in Recent U.S. Military Engagements.
    Strict pacifists say that killing is always wrong. Jewish and Christian pacifists often appeal to the claim in Genesis that all people are made in the image of God, suggesting that killing them represents a kind of sacrilege as well as a violation of human dignity. Christian pacifists also refer to sayings of Jesus in the Gospels to love one's enemies and not retaliate against force with force. Hindu and Buddhist pacifists would cite their basic obligation of ahimsa, avoiding (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. C. Chatterjee (1995). Values in the Indian Ethos: An Overview. Journal of Human Values 1 (1):3-12.
    This paper endeavours to present systematically the essential components of human values and their evolution through various socio-religious movements in the Indian history. The first part of the paper examines the principal values that represent the Indian ethical system. Tyaga , dana , nishtha , satya , ahimsa and upeksha are examined as the keynotes of the Indian values system. The second part looks briefly at the historical context of the evolution of this values system. Enumerating the broad gamut (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Debjani Ganguly & John Docker (eds.) (2008). Rethinking Gandhi and Nonviolent Relationality: Global Perspectives. Routledge.
    This book presents a rethinking of the world legacy of Mahatma Gandhi in this era of unspeakable global violence. Through interdisciplinary research, key Gandhian concepts are revisited by tracing their genealogies in multiple histories of world contact and by foregrounding their relevance to contemporary struggles to regain the ‘humane’ in the midst of global conflict. The relevance of Gandhian notions of ahimsa and satyagraha is assessed in the context of contemporary events, when religious fundamentalisms of various kinds are competing (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Ruth Harris (2013). The Allure of Albert Schweitzer. History of European Ideas 40 (6):804-825.
    In the early 1950s, Albert Schweitzer was a heroic figure, arguably second only to Albert Einstein in renown. Today, many have scarcely heard of him and know nothing of his work as a medical missionary in Equatorial Africa, or of his receipt of the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize. Schweitzer's genius flourished when he felt he was able to operate between cultures. Convinced that he was uniquely able to mediate between opposites, whether it was between France and Germany, Jews and Christians, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 52