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  1. Alan C. Love (ed.) (forthcoming). Evolution, Development, and Conceptual Change.
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  2. Alan C. Love (forthcoming). Typology Reconfigured: From the Metaphysics of Essentialism to the Epistemology of Representation. Acta Biotheoretica.
    The goal of this paper is to encourage a reconfiguration of the discussion about typology in biology away from the metaphysics of essentialism and toward the epistemology of classifying natural phenomena for the purposes of empirical inquiry. First, I briefly review arguments concerning ‘typological thinking’, essentialism, species, and natural kinds, highlighting their predominantly metaphysical nature. Second, I use a distinction between the aims, strategies, and tactics of science to suggest how a shift from metaphysics to epistemology might be accomplished. Typological (...)
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  3. Alan C. Love (2013). Experiments, Intuitions and Images of Philosophy and Science. Analysis 73 (4):785-797.
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  4. Alan C. Love (2013). Erratum To: Theory is as Theory Does: Scientific Practice and Theory Structure in Biology. [REVIEW] Biological Theory 7 (4):430 - 430.
    Using the context of controversies surrounding evolutionary developmental biology (EvoDevo) and the possibility of an Extended Evolutionary Synthesis, I provide an account of theory structure as idealized theory presentations that are always incomplete (partial) and shaped by their conceptual content (material rather than formal organization). These two characteristics are salient because the goals that organize and regulate scientific practice, including the activity of using a theory, are heterogeneous. This means that the same theory can be structured differently, in part because (...)
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  5. Alan C. Love & Gary L. Lugar (2013). Dimensions of Integration in Interdisciplinary Explanations of the Origin of Evolutionary Novelty. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (4):537-550.
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  6. Alan C. Love & Michael Travisano (2013). Microbes Modeling Ontogeny. Biology and Philosophy 28 (2):161-188.
    Model organisms are central to contemporary biology and studies of embryogenesis in particular. Biologists utilize only a small number of species to experimentally elucidate the phenomena and mechanisms of development. Critics have questioned whether these experimental models are good representatives of their targets because of the inherent biases involved in their selection (e.g., rapid development and short generation time). A standard response is that the manipulative molecular techniques available for experimental analysis mitigate, if not counterbalance, this concern. But the most (...)
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  7. Alan C. Love (2012). Formal and Material Theories in Philosophy of Science: A Methodological Interpretation. In. In Henk W. de Regt (ed.), Epsa Philosophy of Science: Amsterdam 2009. Springer. 175--185.
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  8. Andreas Hüttemann & Alan C. Love (2011). COMPARING PART-WHOLE REDUCTIVE EXPLANATIONS IN BIOLOGY AND PHYSICS. In Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao Gonzalo, Thomas Uebel, Stephan Hartmann & Marcel Weber (eds.), Explanation, Prediction, and Confirmation. Springer. 183--202.
    Many biologists and philosophers have worried that importing models of reasoning from the physical sciences obscures our understanding of reasoning in the life sciences. In this paper we discuss one example that partially validates this concern: part-whole reductive explanations. Biology and physics tend to incorporate different models of temporality in part-whole reductive explanations. This results from differential emphases on compositional and causal facets of reductive explanations, which have not been distinguished reliably in prior philosophical analyses. Keeping these two facets distinct (...)
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  9. Andreas Hüttemann & Alan C. Love (2011). Aspects of Reductive Explanation in Biological Science: Intrinsicality, Fundamentality, and Temporality. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (3):519-549.
    The inapplicability of variations on theory reduction in the context of genetics and their irrelevance to ongoing research has led to an anti-reductionist consensus in philosophy of biology. One response to this situation is to focus on forms of reductive explanation that better correspond to actual scientific reasoning (e.g. part–whole relations). Working from this perspective, we explore three different aspects (intrinsicality, fundamentality, and temporality) that arise from distinct facets of reductive explanation: composition and causation. Concentrating on these aspects generates new (...)
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  10. Alan C. Love (2011). Essay Review-ROBERT J. RICHARDS: The Tragic Sense of Life: Ernst Haeckel and the Struggle Over Evolutionary Thought. Philosophy of Science 78 (4).
     
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  11. Alan C. Love (2011). Philosophical Lessons From Scientific Biography* Robert J. Richards , The Tragic Sense of Life: Ernst Haeckel and the Struggle Over Evolutionary Thought . Chicago: University of Chicago Press (2009), 576 Pp., 8 Color Plates, 122 Halftones, $25.00 (Paper). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 78 (4):696-701.
  12. Alan C. Love (2011). Philosophical Lessons From Scientific Biography. Philosophy of Science 78 (4):696-701.
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  13. Alan C. Love (2011). Walking in Darwin's Galápagos Shoes. Metascience 20 (1):117-119.
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  14. Alan C. Love (2008). Explaining Evolutionary Innovations and Novelties: Criteria of Explanatory Adequacy and Epistemological Prerequisites. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):874-886.
    It is a common complaint that antireductionist arguments are primarily negative. Here I describe an alternative nonreductionist epistemology based on considerations taken from multidisciplinary research in biology. The core of this framework consists in seeing investigation as coordinated around sets of problems (problem agendas) that have associated criteria of explanatory adequacy. These ideas are developed in a case study, the explanation of evolutionary innovations and novelties, which demonstrates the applicability and fruitfulness of this nonreductionist epistemological perspective. This account also bears (...)
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  15. Alan C. Love (2008). Review: Massimo Pigliucci and Jonathan Kaplan: Making Sense of Evolution: The Conceptual Foundations of Evolutionary Biology. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (465):201-205.
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  16. Alan C. Love, Ingo Brigandt, Karola Stotz, Daniel Schweitzer & Alexander Rosenber (2008). More Worry and Less Love? Metascience 17 (2):327-327.
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  17. Alan C. Love (2007). Functional Homology and Homology of Function: Biological Concepts and Philosophical Consequences. Biology and Philosophy 22 (5):691-708.
    “Functional homology” appears regularly in different areas of biological research and yet it is apparently a contradiction in terms—homology concerns identity of structure regardless of form and function. I argue that despite this conceptual tension there is a legitimate conception of ‘homology of function’, which can be recovered by utilizing a distinction from pre-Darwinian physiology (use versus activity) to identify an appropriate meaning of ‘function’. This account is directly applicable to molecular developmental biology and shares a connection to the theme (...)
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  18. Alan C. Love (2006). History, Scientific Methodology, and the "Squishy" Sciences. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49 (3):452-456.
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  19. Alan C. Love (2006). Reflections on the Middle Stages of EvoDevo's Ontogeny. Biological Theory 1 (1):94-97.
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  20. Alan C. Love (2006). Evolvability, Plausibility, and Possibility. Bioscience 56 (9):772.
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  21. Alan C. Love (2006). Taking Development Seriously: Who, What, When, Where, Why, How? [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 21 (4):575-589.
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  22. Alan C. Love (2005). Review of Ron Amundson, The Changing Role of the Embryo in Evolutionary Thought: Roots of Evo-Devo. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (10).
  23. Alan C. Love (2005). The Return of the Embryo. Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):567-584.
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  24. Alan C. Love (2003). Evolvability, Dispositions, and Intrinsicality. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1015-1027.
    In this paper I examine a dispositional property that has been receiving increased attention in biology, evolvability. First, I identify three compatible but distinct investigative approaches, distinguish two interpretations of evolvability, and treat the difference between dispositions of individuals versus populations. Second, I explore the relevance of philosophical distinctions about dispositions for evolvability, isolating the assumption that dispositions are intrinsically located. I conclude that some instances of evolvability cannot be understood as purely intrinsic to populations and suggest alternative strategies for (...)
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  25. Alan C. Love (2003). Evolutionary Morphology, Innovation, and the Synthesis of Evolutionary and Developmental Biology. Biology and Philosophy 18 (2):309-345.
    One foundational question in contemporarybiology is how to `rejoin evolution anddevelopment. The emerging research program(evolutionary developmental biology or`evo-devo) requires a meshing of disciplines,concepts, and explanations that have beendeveloped largely in independence over the pastcentury. In the attempt to comprehend thepresent separation between evolution anddevelopment much attention has been paid to thesplit between genetics and embryology in theearly part of the 20th century with itscodification in the exclusion of embryologyfrom the Modern Synthesis. This encourages acharacterization of evolutionary developmentalbiology as the marriage (...)
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  26. Alan C. Love (2002). Darwin and "Cirripedia" Prior to 1846: Exploring the Origins of the Barnacle Research. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 35 (2):251 - 289.
    Phillip Sloan has thoroughly documented the importance of Darwin's general invertebrate research program in the period from 1826 to 1836 and demonstrated how it had an impact on his conversion to transformism. Although Darwin later spent eight years of his life (1846-1854) investigating barnacles, this period has received less treatment in studies of Darwin and the development of his thought. The most prominent question for the barnacle period that has been attended to is why Darwin "delayed" in publishing his (...)
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