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Alan carter [62]Alan B. Carter [1]
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  1. Alan Carter (2011). A Distinction Within Egalitarianism. Journal of Philosophy 108 (10):535-554.
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  2. Alan Carter (2011). Anarchism: Some Theoretical Foundations. Journal of Political Ideologies 16 (3):245-264.
    This article considers two different, yet related, theoretical approaches that could be employed to ground the anarchist critique of Marxist-Leninist revolutionary practice, and thus of the state in general: the State-Primacy Theory and the Quadruplex Theory. The State-Primacy Theory appears to be consistent with several of Bakunin's claims about the state. However, the Quadruplex Theory might, in fact, turn out to be no less consistent with Bakunin's claims than the State-Primacy Theory. In addition, the Quadruplex Theory seems no less capable (...)
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  3. Alan Carter (2011). Primitive Persistence and the Impasse Between Three-Dimensionalism and Four-Dimensionalism. Journal of Philosophy 108 (11).
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  4. Alan Carter (2011). Some Groundwork for a Multidimensional Axiology. Philosophical Studies 154 (3):389 - 408.
    By distinguishing between contributory values and overall value, and by arguing that contributory values are variable values insofar as they contribute diminishing marginal overall value, this article helps to establish the superiority of a certain kind of maximizing, value-pluralist axiology over both sufficientarianism and prioritarianism, as well as over all varieties of value-monism, including utilitarianism and pure egalitarianism.
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  5. Alan Carter (2011). Towards a Multidimensional, Environmentalist Ethic. Environmental Values 20 (3):347-374.
    There has been a process of moral extensionism within environmental ethics from anthropocentrism, through zoocentrism, to ecocentrism. This article maps key elements of that process, and concludes that each of these ethical positions fails as a fully adequate, environmentalist ethic, and does so because of an implicit assumption that is common within normative theory. This notwithstanding, each position may well contribute a value. The problem that then arises is how to trade off those values against each other when they conflict. (...)
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  6. Alan Carter (2010). Animals. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.
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  7. Alan Carter (2010). Biodiversity and All That Jazz. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 80 (1):58-75.
    This article considers several of the most famous arguments for our being under a moral obligation to preserve species, and finds them all wanting. The most promising argument for preserving all varieties of species might seem to be an aesthetic one. Unfortunately, the suggestion that the moral basis for the preservation of species should be construed as similar to the moral basis for the preservation of a work of art seems to presume (what are now widely regarded as) erroneous conceptualizations (...)
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  8. Alan Carter (2010). Beyond Primacy: Marxism, Anarchism and Radical Green Political Theory. Environmental Politics 19 (6):951–972.
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  9. Alan Carter (2009). Is Utilitarian Morality Necessarily Too Demanding. In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), The Problem of Moral Demandingness: New Philosophical Essays. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  10. Alan Carter (2009). Philosophy, Social Institutions, and the Ethics of Belief: A Response to Buchanan. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (3):299-306.
    abstract First, Allen Buchanan, in the version of his paper entitled 'Philosophy and public policy: a role for social moral epistemology' that he presented at the workshop on 'Philosophy and Public Policy' held at the British Academy in London on March 8 th 2008, seems to imply that professional, academic philosophers have had little impact upon public policy. I mention an area where it can be argued in response that they have had a more benign, as well as a more (...)
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  11. Suzanne Uniacke & Alan Carter (2008). Editorial. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):1–1.
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  12. Alan Carter (2006). A Defense of Egalitarianism. Philosophical Studies 131 (2):269 - 302.
    Recently in this journal, Michael Huemer has attempted to refute egalitarianism. His strategy consists in: first, distinguishing between three possible worlds (one with an equal distribution of well-being, one with an unequal distribution at every moment but with an equal distribution overall, and one with an unequal distribution at every moment as well as overall); second, showing that the first world is equal in value to the second world; third, dividing the second and third worlds into two temporal segments each, (...)
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  13. Alan Carter (2006). Political Liberalism and Political Compliance: Part 2 of the Problem of Political Compliance in Rawls’s Theories of Justice. Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (2):135-157.
    Three interlocking features appear to underpin Rawls’s justification of political compliance within the context of political liberalism: namely, a specific territory; a specific society; and a specific conception of what it is to be reasonable. When any one feature is subject to critical examination, while presupposing that the other two are acceptable, Rawls’s argument for political compliance may seem persuasive. But when all three features are critically examined together, his justification of political compliance within political liberalism can be seen to (...)
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  14. Alan Carter (2006). The Evolution of Rawls's Justification of Political Compliance: Part 1 of the Problem of Political Compliance in Rawls's Theories of Justice. Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (1):7-21.
    As Rawls's thought evolved from his 1958 article ‘Justice as Fairness’ to the 1996 edition of his book Political Liberalism, his response to the problem of political compliance would seem to have undergone a number of changes. This article critically evaluates the development of Rawls's various explicit or implied arguments that serve to justify compliance to just social arrangements, and concludes that the problem of political compliance remains without any cogent solution within the vast corpus of Rawls's work. Key Words: (...)
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  15. Alan Carter (2005). Animals, Pain and Morality. Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):17–22.
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  16. Alan carter (2005). Evolution and the Problem of Altruism. Philosophical Studies 123 (3):213-230.
    Genuine altruism would appear to be incompatible with evolutionary theory. And yet altruistic behavior would seem to occur, at least on occasion. This article first considers a game-theoretical attempt at solving this seeming paradox, before considering agroup selectionist approach. Neither approach, as they stand, would seem to render genuine, as opposed to reciprocal, altruism compatible with the theory of evolution. The article concludes by offering an alternative game-theoretical solution to the problem of altruism.
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  17. Alan Carter (2005). Inegalitarian Biocentric Consequentialism, the Minimax Implication and Multidimensional Value Theory: A Brief Proposal for a New Direction in Environmental Ethics. Utilitas 17 (1):62-84.
    Perhaps the most impressive environmental ethic developed to date in any detail is Robin Attfield's biocentric consequentialism. Indeed, on first study, it appears sufficiently impressive that, before presenting any alternative theoretical approach, one would first need to establish why one should not simply embrace Attfield's. After outlining a seemingly decisive flaw in his theory, and then criticizing his response to it, this article adumbrates a very different theoretical basis for an environmental ethic: namely, a value-pluralist one. In so doing, it (...)
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  18. Alan Carter (2004). The Quest for an Egalitarian Metric. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 7 (1):94-113.
    For two decades, egalitarian analytical philosophers have sought to identify the metric to be employed in order to ascertain whether any distribution is equal or not. This essay provides a review of the seminal contributions to this debate by Amartya Sen, Ronald Dworkin, Richard Arneson and G.A. Cohen.
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  19. Alan Carter (2004). Environmental Culture: The Ecological Crisis of Reason. Environmental Ethics 26 (3):323-326.
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  20. Alan Carter (2004). Projectivism and the Last Person Argument. American Philosophical Quarterly 41 (1):51-62.
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  21. Alan Carter (2004). Saving Nature and Feeding People. Environmental Ethics 26 (4):339-360.
    Holmes Rolston, III has argued that there are times when we should save nature rather than feed people. In arguing thus, Rolston appears tacitly to share a number of assumptions with Garrett Hardin regarding the causes of human overpopulation. Those assumptions are most likely erroneous. Rather than our facing the choice between saving nature or feeding people, we will not save nature unless we feed people.
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  22. Alan Carter (2004). Some Theoretical Foundations for Radical Green Politics. Environmental Values 13 (3):305 - 328.
    On the basis of our apparent obligations to future generations, it would seem that we are morally obliged to reduce the risk our environmentally destructive behaviour poses for their well-being. But if, rather than choosing to destroy the environment, we are in fact driven to do so, then any obligation to reduce our environmental impact requires an understanding of the mechanism driving our behaviour. This article argues that the State-Primacy Theory provides a plausible explanation for the nature of that mechanism, (...)
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  23. Alan Carter (2003). Morality and Freedom. Philosophical Quarterly 53 (211):161 - 180.
    What might be termed 'the problem of morality' concerns how freedom-restricting principles may be justified, given that we value our freedom. Perhaps an answer can be found in freedom itself. For if the most obvious reason for rejecting moral demands is that they invade one's personal freedom, then the price of freedom from invasive demands that others would otherwise make may well require everyone accepting freedom in general, say, as a value that provides sufficient reason for adhering to principles that (...)
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  24. Alan Carter (2002). On Harming Others: A Response to Partridge. Environmental Values 11 (1):87 - 96.
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  25. Alan Carter (2002). Value-Pluralist Egalitarianism. Journal of Philosophy 99 (11):577-599.
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  26. Alan Carter (2001). Can We Harm Future People? Environmental Values 10 (4):429–454.
    It appears to have been established that it is not possible for us to harm distant future generations by failing to adopt long-range welfare policies which would conserve resources or limit pollution. By exploring a number of possible worlds, the present article shows, first, that the argument appears to be at least as telling against Aristotelian, rights-based and Rawlsian approaches as it seems to be against utilitarianism, but second, and most importantly, that it only holds if we fail to view (...)
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  27. Alan Carter (2001). Presumptive Benefits and Political Obligation. Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (3):229–243.
  28. Alan Carter (2001). Simplifying "Inequality". Philosophy and Public Affairs 30 (1):88–100.
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  29. Alan Carter (2000). Analytical Anarchism: Some Conceptual Foundations. Political Theory 28 (2):230-253.
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  30. Alan Carter (2000). Distributive Justice and Enviromental Sustainability. Heythrop Journal 41 (4):449–460.
  31. Alan Carter (2000). Humean Nature. Environmental Values 9 (1):3 - 37.
    It has been argued that there is an irreconcilable difference between those advocating animal liberation or animal rights, on the one hand, and those preferring a wider environmental ethic, which includes concern for non-sentient life-forms and species preservation, on the other. In contrast, I argue that it is possible to provide foundations for both seemingly environmentalist positions by exploring some of the potential of a 'collective-projectivist' reading of Hume – one that seems more consistent with Hume's texts than other readings. (...)
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  32. Alan Carter (2000). On Pascal's Wager, or Why All Bets Are Off. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (198):22-27.
  33. Alan Carter (1999). Animal Life and Afterlife. Cogito 13 (1):27-31.
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  34. Alan Carter (1999). A Radical Green Political Theory. Routledge.
    This volume analyzes authoritarian, reformist, Marxist and anarchist approaches to the environmental problem, exposing the relationships between environmental crises, economic structures and the role of the state.
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  35. Alan Carter (1999). Game Theory and Decentralisation. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (3):223–234.
  36. Alan Carter (1999). Moral Theory and Global Population. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 99 (3):289–313.
    Ascertaining the optimum global population raises not just substantive moral problems but also philosophical ones, too. In particular, serious problems arise for utilitarianism. For example, should one attempt to bring about the greatest total happiness or the highest level of average happiness? This article argues that neither approach on its own provides a satisfactory answer, and nor do rights-based or Rawlsian approaches, either. Instead, what is required is a multidimensional approach to moral questions—one which recognises the plurality of our values. (...)
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  37. Alan Carter (1999). The Method in Hobbes' Madness. Hobbes Studies 12 (1):72-89.
  38. Hyun-Soo Ahn, Lilli Alanen, Raphael Cohen Almagor, David M. Armstrong, Rudolph Bernet, Paul Blum, Miles Burnyeat, Alan Carter, Neus Torbisco Casals & Roberto Casati (1998). Visiting Professors From Abroad, 1998-99. Review of Metaphysics 52:249-257.
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  39. Alan Carter (1998). Fettering, Development and Revolution. Heythrop Journal 39 (2):170–188.
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  40. Alan Carter (1998). In Defence of Radical Disobedience. Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (1):29–47.
  41. Alan Carter (1998). Marx's Communist Vision. Cogito 12 (2):125-129.
  42. Alan Carter (1998). World Hunger and the Duty to Provide Aid. Heythrop Journal 39 (3):319–324.
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  43. Dale Jamieson, Alan Carter, David Papineau & John O'Neill (1998). Tainted Cash? The Philosophers' Magazine 3 (3):26-27.
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  44. Alan Carter (1997). Infanticide and the Right to Life. Ratio 10 (1):1–9.
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  45. Alan Carter (1997). State–Primacy and Third World Debt. Heythrop Journal 38 (3):300–314.
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  46. Alan Carter (1996). A Radical Environmentalist Political Theory: Part Three of 'Foundations for Developing a Green Political Theory'. Cogito 10 (3):209-219.
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  47. Alan Carter (1996). Eco-Authoritarianism, Eco-Reformism or Eco-Marxism?: Part Two of 'Foundations for Developing a Green Political Theory'. Cogito 10 (2):115-123.
  48. Alan Carter (1996). The Environmental Crises and Political Theory: A Three-Part Study. Part 1 of Foundations for Developing a Green Political Theory. Cogito 10 (1):40-49.
     
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  49. Alan Carter (1996). The Environmental Crises and Political Theory. Cogito 10 (1):40-49.
  50. Alan Carter (1995). Animal Rights and Social Relations. Res Publica 1 (2):213-220.
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