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Alan Norrie [15]Alan W. Norrie [4]
  1. Alan Norrie (forthcoming). Ethics and History: Can Critical Lawyers Talk of Good and Evil? [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-14.
    This essay explores what we might mean by good and evil, and argues that these terms remain salient for a critical, socio-historical, understanding of criminal law. It draws upon a meta-ethics of freedom and solidarity to explain what good means in recent mercy killing cases in England and Wales, and what evil means in Arendt’s phrase, the ‘banality of evil’.
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  2. Alan Norrie (2013). Debate Hegel and Bhaskar. Journal of Critical Realism 12 (3):359-376.
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  3. Alan Norrie (2012). The Scene and the Crime: Can Critical Realists Talk About Good and Evil? Journal of Critical Realism 11 (1):76-93.
    This essay argues that critical realism provides a philosophical perspective from which to talk about good and evil. It draws on dialectical critical realism’s meta-ethics of freedom and solidarity, and the different grades of freedom identified there: from the basic spontaneity in agency to the possibility of a fully flourishing, eudaimonic social condition. It argues that evil acts can be understood as those which fundamentally deny basic human freedom (spontaneity) and solidarity, and that good acts are those which affirm human (...)
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  4. Alan Norrie (2012). Who Is 'The Prince'?: Hegel and Marx in Jameson and Bhaskar. Historical Materialism 20 (2):75-104.
  5. Alan Norrie (2010). Bhaskar, Adorno and the Dialectics of Modern Freedom. Journal of Critical Realism 3 (1):23-48.
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  6. Alan W. Norrie (2010). Dialectic and Difference: Dialectical Critical Realism and the Grounds of Justice. Routledge.
    Introduction: Natural necessity, being, and becoming -- Accentuate the negative -- Diffracting dialectic -- Opening totality -- Constellating ethics -- Metacritique I : philosophy's primordial failing -- Metacritique II : dialectic and difference -- Conclusion: Natural necessity and the grounds of justice : natural necessity as material meshwork.
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  7. Alan Norrie (2007). Historical Differentiation, Moral Judgment and the Modern Criminal Law. Criminal Law and Philosophy 1 (3):251-257.
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  8. Alan Norrie (2007). Justice and Relationality. Journal of Critical Realism 3 (1).
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  9. Alan Norrie & Nick Hostettler (2007). Do You Like Soul Music? Review of From East to West: Odyssey of a Soul by Roy Bhaskar. Journal of Critical Realism 3 (2).
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  10. Alan Norrie (2005). Review of The New Dialectic and Marx's 'Capital' by Christopher J. Arthur. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 4 (2):477-481.
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  11. Alan W. Norrie (2005). Law and the Beautiful Soul. Published in the United States by Cavendish Pub..
    What is law? How is legal responsibility defined? How does law reflect moral judgment? Why are law's definitions uncertain and conflicted? Basic questions for liberal law and criminal justice - what could they have to do with the forgotten historical figure of the Beautiful Soul? Starting from concrete legal issues, Alan Norrie develops a critical vision of law in its relation to morality and socio-historical context. Liberal law, he argues, is marked by splits and contradictions (antinomies), signs of something missed. (...)
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  12. Alan W. Norrie (2000). Punishment, Responsibility, and Justice: A Relational Critique. Oxford University Press.
    This book addresses the retributive and "orthodox subjectivist" theories that dominate criminal justice theory alongside recent "revisionist" and "postmodern" approaches. Norrie argues that all these approaches, together with their faults and contradictions, stem from their orientation to themes in Kantian moral philosophy. He explores an alternative relational or dialectical approach; examines the work of Ashworth, Duff, Fletcher, Moore, Smith, and Williams; and considers key doctrinal issues.
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  13. Tony Lawson & Alan Norrie (1998). Critical Realism: Essential Readings. In Margaret Scotford Archer (ed.), Critical Realism: Essential Readings. Routledge.
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  14. Alan Norrie (1998). The Praxiology of Legal Judgement'. In Margaret Scotford Archer (ed.), Critical Realism: Essential Readings. Routledge. 544--58.
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  15. Alan W. Norrie (1997). Commentary on" Pathological Autobiographies". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (2):115-118.
  16. Alan Norrie (1993). Closure or Critique : Current Directions in Western Legal Theory. In K. B. Agrawal & R. K. Raizada (eds.), Sociological Jurisprudence and Legal Philosophy: Random Thoughts On. University Book House.
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  17. Alan Norrie (1992). Subjectivism, Objectivism and the Limits of Criminal Recklessness. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 12 (1):45-58.
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  18. Alan Norrie (1989). Punishment and Justice in Adam Smith. Ratio Juris 2 (3):227-239.
  19. Alan Norrie (1984). Thomas Hobbes and the Philosophy of Punishment. Law and Philosophy 3 (2):299 - 320.
    In this article I argue for a full appraisal of Hobbes's theory of punishment which takes account of its divergent and contradictory aspects. Examining his theory within the general context of his position in Leviathan, it is possible to see its centrality for the subsequent development of the modern philosophy of punishment. From this point of view, it is also possible to pinpoint the source of a central weakness in the retributive theory of punishment.
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