Search results for 'Alan Slater' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Heather R. Dixon-Fowler, Daniel J. Slater, Jonathan L. Johnson, Alan E. Ellstrand & Andrea M. Romi (2013). Beyond “Does It Pay to Be Green?” A Meta-Analysis of Moderators of the CEP–CFP Relationship. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):353-366.score: 240.0
    Review of extant research on the corporate environmental performance (CEP) and corporate financial performance (CFP) link generally demonstrates a positive relationship. However, some arguments and empirical results have demonstrated otherwise. As a result, researchers have called for a contingency approach to this research stream, which moves beyond the basic question “does it pay to be green?” and instead asks “when does it pay to be green?” In answering this call, we provide a meta-analytic review of CEP–CFP literature in which we (...)
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  2. Gavin Bremner & Alan Slater (eds.) (2004). Theories of Infant Development. Blackwell.score: 240.0
    This volume provides an authoritative, up-to-date survey of theories of infant development.
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  3. Paul C. Quinn, Gizelle Anzures, Carroll E. Izard, Kang Lee, Olivier Pascalis, Alan M. Slater & James W. Tanaka (2011). Looking Across Domains to Understand Infant Representation of Emotion. Emotion Review 3 (2):197-206.score: 240.0
    A comparison of the literatures on how infants represent generic object classes, gender and race information in faces, and emotional expressions reveals both common and distinctive developments in the three domains. In addition, the review indicates that some very basic questions remain to be answered regarding how infants represent facial displays of emotion, including (a) whether infants form category representations for discrete classes of emotion, (b) when and how such representations come to incorporate affective meaning, (c) the developmental trajectory for (...)
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  4. Kang Lee, Gizelle Anzures, Paul Quinn, Alan Slater & Olivier Pascalis (2011). Development of Face Processing Expertise. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford.score: 240.0
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  5. Paul C. Quinn, Gizelle Anzures, Carroll E. Izard, Kang Lee, Alan M. Slater, Olivier Pascalis & James W. Tanaka (2010). The Processing of Emotion Expression Information From Faces by Infants. Emotion Review 2:1-10.score: 240.0
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  6. Hartley Slater, The Central Error in the Tractatus Hartley Slater.score: 180.0
    Robert Fogelin claimed there was an error in the logic of the Tractatus. I first cover his point here before going on to show that any error in this area derived from an even more fundamental one. Correcting that further error, moreover, does more than correct the logic of the Tractatus: it has repercussions for the metaphysics and theory of value found there, in line with later developments in Wittgenstein’s philosophy. In what follows I use the Tractarian numbers (...)
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  7. Hartley Slater, Motivation by de Se Beliefs B.H.Slater.score: 180.0
    Such a misconception of grammar characterises a very popular approach to indexicality which has been current since the 1970s, stemming from the work of Casteñeda, and Kaplan. Gareth Evans was inclined to allow, for instance, that one could say ‘“To the left (I am hot)” is true, as uttered by x at t iff there is someone moderately near to the left of x such that, if he were to utter the sentence “I am hot” at t, what he would (...)
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  8. John G. Slater & Frederick Michael Walsh (eds.) (2008). A Hundred Years of Philosophy From the Slater & Walsh Collections: Exhibition and Catalogue. Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto.score: 180.0
     
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  9. Oswald Bayer & M. Alan (eds.) (1996). Worship and Ethics: Lutherans and Anglicans in Dialogue. Walter De Gruyter.score: 60.0
    The Anglican Tradition of Moral Theology Alan M. Suggate Hooker and the via media For the English who experienced the impact of the Reformation on the ...
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  10. Michael R. Slater (2009). William James on Ethics and Faith. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    This book offers a new interpretation of William James's ethical and religious thought. Michael Slater shows that James's conception of morality, or what it means to lead a moral and flourishing life, is intimately tied to his conception of religious faith, and argues that James's views on these matters are worthy of our consideration. He offers a reassessment of James's 'will to believe' or 'right to believe' doctrine, his moral theory, and his neglected moral arguments for religious faith. And (...)
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  11. Tapper Alan & Ewin R. E. (eds.) (2004). Julius Kovesi, Moral Notions, with Three Papers on Plato. Cybereditions.score: 60.0
    Morality is often thought of as non-rational or sub-rational. In Moral Notions, first published in 1967, Julius Kovesi argues that the rationality of morality is built into the way we construct moral concepts. In showing this he also resolves the old Humean conundrum of the relation between 'facts' and 'values'. And he puts forward a method of reasoning that might make 'applied ethics' (at present largely a hodge-podge of opinions) into a constructive discipline. Kovesi's general theory of concepts - important (...)
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  12. Carol Slater (1994). Discrimination Without Indication: Why Dretske Can't Lean on Learning. Mind and Language 9 (2):163-80.score: 30.0
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  13. Hartley Slater (1995). Scare Quoted Seeing. American Philosophical Quarterly 32 (1):97-103.score: 30.0
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  14. G. S. Voss (2013). 'It is a Beautiful Experiment': Queer(y)Ing the Work of Alan Turing. AI and Society 28 (4):567-573.score: 24.0
    Alan Turing is known for both his mathematical creativity and genius and role in cryptography war efforts, and for his homosexuality, for which he was persecuted. Yet there is little work that brings these two parts of his life together. This paper deconstructs and moves beyond the extant stereotypes around perceived associations between gay men and creativity, to consider how Turing’s lived experience as a queer mathematician provides a rich seam of insight into the ways in which his life, (...)
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  15. M. I. Marsh (2011). Alan Ware, The Dynamics of Two Party Politics (Oxford University Press, 2009). Japanese Journal of Political Science 12 (3):421-425.score: 24.0
    This small book packs a considerable theoretical and practical punch. Alan Ware challenges much received wisdom about the dynamics of two party politics. In the process, he adds considerably to contemporary discussion of the intersection of structure and agency in the development and adaptation of political systems. Ware picks out two party systems for concentrated attention because of their relative tractability – in his words: ‘these systems are ideal for analysing the capacity of parties to pursue their interests in (...)
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  16. Gabriel Andrade (2004). Alan Macfarlane: Entre El Mundo Moderno y la Sociedad Tradicional. Utopía y Praxis Latinoamericana 9 (26):113-118.score: 24.0
    In this in ter view, the pres ti gious an thro - pol o gist, his to rian and T.V. anaouncer, Alan Macfarlane com ments on some of the is sues that have been ad dressed in his writ ings. His main the o ret i cal con cern has been to study the pe cu - liar con di tions that gave rise to the mod e..
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  17. Alan Earl‐Slater & Victoria Wilcox (1997). Audit: An Exploration of Two Models From Outside the Health Care Environment. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 3 (4):265-274.score: 24.0
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  18. Alan Earl-Slater (1996). The Economics of Compassionate Supply. Health Care Analysis 4 (3):224-226.score: 24.0
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  19. Alan Donagan (1994). The Philosophical Papers of Alan Donagan. University of Chicago Press.score: 21.0
    A major voice in late twentieth-century philosophy, Alan Donagan is distinguished for his theories on the history of philosophy and the nature of morality. The Philosophical Papers of Alan Donagan, volumes 1 and 2, collect 28 of Donagan's most important and best-known essays on historical understanding and ethics from 1957 to 1991. Volume 2 addresses issues in the philosophy of action and moral theory. With papers on Kant, von Wright, Sellars, and Chisholm, this volume also covers a range (...)
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  20. Fred Dretske (1994). Reply to Slater and Garcia-Carpintero. Mind and Language 9 (2):203-8.score: 21.0
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  21. Alan Chalmers (2006). Why Alan Musgrave Should Become an Essentialist. In Colin Cheyne & John Worrall (eds.), Rationality and Reality: Conversations with Alan Musgrave. Springer. 165--181.score: 21.0
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  22. Alan Keightley (2012). Alan Watts: The Immediate Magic of God. In Peter J. Columbus & Donadrian L. Rice (eds.), Alan Watts--Here and Now: Contributions to Psychology, Philosophy, and Religion. State University of New York Press. 43.score: 21.0
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  23. Alan Pope (2012). Contributions and Conundrums in the Psychospiritual Transformation of Alan Watts. In Peter J. Columbus & Donadrian L. Rice (eds.), Alan Watts--Here and Now: Contributions to Psychology, Philosophy, and Religion. State University of New York Press. 183.score: 21.0
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  24. Stathos Psillos, Review of Alan Musgrave, Essays on Realism and Rationalism. [REVIEW]score: 18.0
    Alan Musgrave has been one of the most important philosophers of science in the last quarter of the 20th century. He has exemplified an exceptional combination of clearheaded and profound philosophical thinking. Two seem to be the pillars of his thought: an uncompromising commitment to scientific realism and an equally uncompromising commitment to deductivism. The essays reprinted in this volume (which span a period of 25 years, from 1974 to 1999) testify to these two commitments. (There are two omissions (...)
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  25. Gualtiero Piccinini (2003). Alan Turing and the Mathematical Objection. Minds and Machines 13 (1):23-48.score: 18.0
    This paper concerns Alan Turing’s ideas about machines, mathematical methods of proof, and intelligence. By the late 1930s, Kurt Gödel and other logicians, including Turing himself, had shown that no finite set of rules could be used to generate all true mathematical statements. Yet according to Turing, there was no upper bound to the number of mathematical truths provable by intelligent human beings, for they could invent new rules and methods of proof. So, the output of a human mathematician, (...)
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  26. William Hasker (2010). Defining 'Gratuitous Evil': A Response to Alan R. Rhoda. Religious Studies 46 (3):303-309.score: 18.0
    In his article, 'Gratuitous evil and divine providence', Alan Rhoda claims to have produced an uncontroversial theological premise for the evidential argument from evil. I argue that his premise is by no means uncontroversial among theists, and I doubt that any premise can be found that is both uncontroversial and useful for the argument from evil.
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  27. Michael Potts (2001). A Requiem for Whole Brain Death: A Response to D. Alan Shewmons the Brain and Somatic Integration. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (5):479 – 491.score: 18.0
    Alan Shewmons article, The brain and somatic integration: Insights into the standard biological rationale for equating brain death with death (2001), strikes at the heart of the standard justification for whole brain death criteria. The standard justification, which I call the standard paradigm, holds that the permanent loss of the functions of the entire brain marks the end of the integrative unity of the body. In my response to Shewmons article, I first offer a brief summary of the standard (...)
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  28. Ralph Wedgwood (2012). The Nature and Value of Knowledge: Three Investigations, by Duncan Pritchard, Alan Millar, and Adrian Haddock. [REVIEW] Analysis 72 (1):187-189.score: 18.0
    This is a review of "The nature and value of knowlege: Three investigations", by Duncan Pritchard, Alan Millar, and Adrian Haddock (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2011).
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  29. L. E. E. Patrick & Germain Grisez (2010). Total Brain Death: A Reply to Alan Shewmon. Bioethics 26 (5):275-284.score: 18.0
    D. Alan Shewmon has advanced a well-documented challenge to the widely accepted total brain death criterion for death of the human being. We show that Shewmon's argument against this criterion is unsound, though he does refute the standard argument for that criterion. We advance a distinct argument for the total brain death criterion and answer likely objections. Since human beings are rational animals – sentient organisms of a specific type – the loss of the radical capacity for sentience (the (...)
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  30. Justin Leiber (2001). Turing and the Fragility and Insubstantiality of Evolutionary Explanations: A Puzzle About the Unity of Alan Turing's Work with Some Larger Implications. Philosophical Psychology 14 (1):83-94.score: 18.0
    As is well known, Alan Turing drew a line, embodied in the "Turing test," between intellectual and physical abilities, and hence between cognitive and natural sciences. Less familiarly, he proposed that one way to produce a "passer" would be to educate a "child machine," equating the experimenter's improvements in the initial structure of the child machine with genetic mutations, while supposing that the experimenter might achieve improvements more expeditiously than natural selection. On the other hand, in his foundational "On (...)
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  31. Deryck Beyleveld (1991). The Dialectical Necessity of Morality: An Analysis and Defense of Alan Gewirth's Argument to the Principle of Generic Consistency. University of Chicago Press.score: 18.0
    Alan Gewirth's Reason and Morality , in which he set forth the Principle of Generic Consistency, is a major work of modern ethical theory that, though much debated and highly respected, has yet to gain full acceptance. Deryck Beyleveld contends that this resistance stems from misunderstanding of the method and logical operations of Gewirth's central argument. In this book Beyleveld seeks to remedy this deficiency. His rigorous reconstruction of Gewirth's argument gives its various parts their most compelling formulation and (...)
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  32. Alan W. Richardson & Thomas E. Uebel (2005). Alan W. Richardson. 'The Tenacious, Malleable, Indefatigable, and yet, Eternally Modifiable Will': Hans Reichenbach's Knowing Subject. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79 (1):73–87.score: 18.0
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  33. Francesco Paoli (2003). Quine and Slater on Paraconsistency and Deviance. Journal of Philosophical Logic 32 (5):531-548.score: 18.0
    In a famous and controversial paper, B. H. Slater has argued against the possibility of paraconsistent logics. Our reply is centred on the distinction between two aspects of the meaning of a logical constant *c* in a given logic: its operational meaning, given by the operational rules for *c* in a cut-free sequent calculus for the logic at issue, and its global meaning, specified by the sequents containing *c* which can be proved in the same calculus. Subsequently, we use (...)
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  34. Matthew H. Kramer & Nigel E. Simmonds (1998). No Better Reasons: A Reply to Alan Gewirth. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (1):131-139.score: 18.0
    Alan Gewirth has propounded a moral theory which commits him to the view that prescriptions can appropriately be addressed to people who have neither any moral reasons nor any prudential reasons to follow the prescriptions. We highlight the strangeness of Gewirth's position and then show that it undermines his attempt to come up with a supreme moral principle.
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  35. D. Alan Shewmon (2009). D. Alan Shewmon Replies. Hastings Center Report 39 (5):6-7.score: 18.0
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  36. Robin Attfield (2003). Biocentric Consequentialism, Pluralism, and 'The Minimax Implication': A Reply to Alan Carter. Utilitas 15 (01):76-.score: 18.0
    Alan Carter's recent review in Mind of my Ethics of the Global Environment combines praise of biocentric consequentialism (as presented there and in Value, Obligation and Meta-Ethics) with criticisms that it could advocate both minimal satisfaction of human needs and the extinction of for the sake of generating extra people; Carter also maintains that as a monistic theory it is predictably inadequate to cover the full range of ethical issues, since only a pluralistic theory has this capacity. In this (...)
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  37. James D. Sellmann (2013). Philosophy and Religion in Early Medieval China Ed. By Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo (Review). Philosophy East and West 63 (3):451-455.score: 18.0
    The Early Han enjoyed some prosperity while it struggled with centralization and political control of the kingdom. The Later Han was plagued by the court intrigue, corrupt eunuchs, and massive flooding of the Yellow River that eventually culminated in popular uprisings that led to the demise of the dynasty. The period that followed was a renewed warring states period that likewise stimulated a rebirth of philosophical and religious debate, growth, and innovations. Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo's Philosophy (...)
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  38. Anthony F. Beavers, Alan Turing: Mathematical Mechanist.score: 18.0
    I live just off of Bell Road outside of Newburgh, Indiana, a small town of 3,000 people. A mile down the street Bell Road intersects with Telephone Road not as a modern reminder of a technology belonging to bygone days, but as testimony that this technology, now more than a century and a quarter old, is still with us. In an age that prides itself on its digital devices and in which the computer now equals the telephone as a medium (...)
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  39. Panu Raatikainen, Alan Turing.score: 18.0
    Englantilaisen yleisneron Alan Turingin kuoleman yllä lepää salaperäisyyden verho. On hyvin mahdollista, ettei kenenkään muun nykyajan ajattelijan kuolemaan liity yhtä paljon legendoja ja spekulaatioita. Kiistattomat tosiasiat ovat lyhykäisyydessään seuraavat: siivooja löysi Turingin kotoaan kuolleena 8. kesäkuuta 1954. Turingin todettiin kuolleen edellisenä iltana syanidimyrkytykseen, ja hänen viereltään löytyi puoliksi syöty omena. Hän oli kuollessaan 41-vuotias. Loppu on enemmän tai vähemmän arvailujen varassa.
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  40. Slava Sadovnikov (2008). Review Essay: Apprehending the "Social&Quot;: Outhwaite, William, Ed. (2006 [2003]). The Blackwell Dictionary of Modern Social Thought. 2nd Edition. Advisory Editor Alain Touraine. Malden, Ma and Oxford, Uk: Blackwell Publishing. Sica, Alan, Edited and with Introductions (2005). Social Thought: From the Enlightenment to the Present. Boston: Pearson Education. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (4):533-544.score: 18.0
    The two books reviewed here are different efforts to embrace the vast subject called "social thought." The second edition of The Blackwell Dictionary of Modern Social Thought, edited by William Outhwaite with Alain Touraine, contains numerous updates; yet it also has some disadvantages compared to the first edition. Social Thought: From the Enlightenment to the Present, edited by Alan Sica, is a bold but controversial attempt at gathering in one anthology as many social thinkers as possible. Key Words: "social" (...)
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  41. Greg Frost-Arnold (2008). Review of Alan Richardson, Thomas Uebel (Eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Logical Empiricism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (5).score: 18.0
    For much of the second half of the 20th Century, the primary role logical empiricism played was that of the argumentative foil. The 'received view' on a given topic (especially in philosophy of science, logic, or language) was frequently identified with some supposedly dogmatic tenet of logical empiricism. However, during the last twenty-five years, scholars have paid serious, sustained attention to what the logical positivists, individually and collectively, actually said. Early scholarship on logical empiricism had to engage in heavy-duty PR (...)
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  42. Andrew Hodges, Alan Turing in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 18.0
    The origin of my article lies in the appearance of Copeland and Proudfoot's feature article in Scientific American, April 1999. This preposterous paper, as described on another page, suggested that Turing was the prophet of 'hypercomputation'. In their references, the authors listed Copeland's entry on 'The Church-Turing thesis' in the Stanford Encyclopedia. In the summer of 1999, I circulated an open letter criticising the Scientific American article. I included criticism of this Encyclopedia entry. This was forwarded (by Prof. Sol Feferman) (...)
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  43. Jason Kawall (2007). Review of Alan Thomas, Value and Context: The Nature of Moral and Political Knowledge. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (9).score: 18.0
    This is, surprisingly enough, a review of Alan Thomas' "Value and Context: The Nature of Moral and Political Knowledge". A very nice book. More details in the review itself.
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  44. Eileen John (2014). 'Philosophy and the Novel', by Goldman, Alan H. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (3):590-593.score: 18.0
    (2014). ‘Philosophy and the Novel’, by Goldman, Alan H. Australasian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 92, No. 3, pp. 590-593. doi: 10.1080/00048402.2014.885069.
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  45. Justin Leiber, Alan Mathison Turing: The Maker of Our Age.score: 18.0
    In his short life, Alan Turing (1912-1954) made foundational contributions to philosophy, mathematics, biology, artificial intelligence, and computer science. He, as much as anyone, invented the digital electronic computer. From September, 1939 much of his work on computation was war-driven and brutally practical. He developed high speed computing devices needed to decipher German Enigma Machine messages to and from U-boats, countering the most serious threat by far to Britain's survival during World War Two. Yet few people have an image (...)
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  46. Peter Millican & A. Clark (eds.) (1996). Machines and Thought, The Legacy of Alan Turing. Oup.score: 18.0
    This is the first of two volumes of essays in commemoration of Alan Turing, whose pioneering work in the theory of artificial intelligence and computer science ...
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  47. Stanley Aronowitz, Alan Sokal's "Transgression" By.score: 18.0
    Explaining his now famous parody in Social Text's "Science Wars" issue, Alan Sokal writes in Dissent ("Afterword", Fall 1996): But why did I do it? I confess that I'm an unabashed Old Leftist who never quite understood how deconstruction was supposed to help the working class. And I'm a stodgy old scientist who believes, naively, that there exists an external world, that there exist objective truths about that world, and that my job is to discover some of them. (...)
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  48. Justin Leiber, Alan Turing.score: 18.0
    In his short life, Alan Turing (1912-1954) made foundational contributions to philosophy, mathematics, biology, artificial intelligence, and computer science. He, as much as anyone, invented and showed how to program the digital electronic computer. From September, 1939, his work on computation was war-driven and brutally practical. He developed high speed computing devices needed to decipher German Enigma Machine messages to and from U-boats, countering the most serious threat by far to Britain..
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  49. Tito Orlandi (2013). Nel centenario della nascita di Alan Turing. Augustinianum 53 (1):261-265.score: 18.0
    It seems opportune to commemorate in ‘Augustinianum’ the centenary of the birth of Alan Turing, insofar as he is an outstanding figure whose theoritical insight gave birth to the computer revolution of the twentieth centur y. His theories are equally important for the methodology supporting studies in the humanities.
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  50. Carl Thomen (2011). Sublime Kinetic Melody: Kelly Slater and the Extreme Spectator. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (3):319-331.score: 18.0
    This paper aims to examine the awesome, almost spiritual feeling I experience as an ?extreme spectator? while watching Kelly Slater ride the monstrous waves of Pipeline. Drawing on the aesthetics of Kant and Schopenhauer, I examine the experience of the sublime and how it, in conjunction with the perceived kinetic melody of Slater's movements and his karmic connection to the environment in which he thrives, gives rise to the deeply felt awe of the extreme spectator. My intention is (...)
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