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  1. R. Edward Freeman, Gianfranco Rusconi, Silvana Signori & Alan Strudler (2012). Stakeholder Theory(Ies): Ethical Ideas and Managerial Action. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (1):1-2.
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  2. R. Edward Freeman, Gianfranco Rusconi, Silvana Signori & Alan Strudler (2012). Stakeholder Theory(Ies): Ethical Ideas and Managerial Action. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (1):1 - 2.
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  3. Tae Wan Kim & Alan Strudler (2012). Workplace Civility. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (3):557-577.
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  4. Adam D. Bailey & Alan Strudler (2011). Dialogue. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):661-677.
    Confucianism-Based Rights Skepticism and Rights in the Workplace by Adam D. Bailey - Must even Confucian rights skeptics—those who are, on account of their Confucian beliefs, skeptical of the existence of human rights, and believe that asserting or recognizing rights is morally wrong—concede that in the workplace, they are morally obligated to recognize rights? Alan Strudler has recently argued that such is the case. In this article, I argue that because Confucian rights skeptics locate wrongness in inconsistency with the idea (...)
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  5. Adam D. Bailey & Alan Strudler (2011). Dialogue - The Confucian Critique of Rights-Based Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):661-677.
    Confucianism-Based Rights Skepticism and Rights in the Workplace by Adam D. Bailey - Must even Confucian rights skeptics—those who are, on account of their Confucian beliefs, skeptical of the existence of human rights, and believe that asserting or recognizing rights is morally wrong—concede that in the workplace, they are morally obligated to recognize rights? Alan Strudler has recently argued that such is the case. In this article, I argue that because Confucian rights skeptics locate wrongness in inconsistency with the idea (...)
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  6. John Hasnas, Robert Prentice & Alan Strudler (2010). New Directions in Legal Scholarship. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):503-531.
    Legal scholars and business ethicists are interested in many of the same core issues regarding human and firm behavior. The vast amount of legal research being generated by nearly 10,000 law school and business law scholars will inevitably influence business ethics research. This paper describes some of the recent trends in legal scholarship and explores its implications for three significant aspects of business ethics research—methodology, theory, and policy.
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  7. Alan Strudler (2010). New Directions in Legal Scholarship. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):503-531.
    Legal scholars and business ethicists are interested in many of the same core issues regarding human and firm behavior. The vast amount of legal research being generated by nearly 10,000 law school and business law scholars will inevitably influence business ethics research. This paper describes some of the recent trends in legal scholarship and explores its implications for three significant aspects of business ethics research—methodology, theory, and policy.
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  8. Alan Strudler (2010). The Distinctive Wrong in Lying. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (2):171 - 179.
    In this essay I will argue, as does Bernard Williams, that lying and misleading are both commonly wrong because they involve an aim to breach a trust. I will also argue, contrary to Williams, that lying and misleading threaten trust differently, and that when they are wrong, they are wrong differently. Indeed, lying may be wrong when misleading is not.
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  9. Alan Strudler (2010). The Moral Problem in Insider Trading. In George G. Brenkert & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  10. Eric W. Orts & Alan Strudler (2009). Putting a Stake in Stakeholder Theory. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):605 - 615.
    The primary appeal of stakeholder theory in business ethics derives from its promise to help solve two large and often morally difficult problems: (1) how to manage people fairly and efficiently and (2) how to determine the extent of a firm's moral responsibilities beyond its obligations to enhance its profits and economic value. This article investigates a variety of conceptual quandaries that stakeholder theory faces in addressing these two general problems. It argues that these quandaries pose intractable obstacles for stakeholder (...)
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  11. Alan Strudler (2009). Deception and Trust. In Clancy W. Martin (ed.), The Philosophy of Deception. Oxford University Press. 139.
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  12. Alan Strudler (2008). Confucian Skepticism About Workplace Rights. Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (1):67-83.
    Confucian scholars express skepticism about rights. This skepticism is relevant to managers who face issues about the recognition of workplace rights in a Confucian culture. My essay examines the foundations of this skepticism, and the cogency of potential leading Western liberal responses to it. I conclude that Confucian skepticism is more formidable than liberals have recognized. I attempt to craft an argument that defuses Confucian skepticism about workplace rights while at the same time respecting the moral depth of Confucianism.
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  13. Nien-hê Hsieh, Alan Strudler & David Wasserman (2007). Pairwise Comparison and Numbers Skepticism. Utilitas 19 (4):487-504.
    In this article, we defend pairwise comparison as a method to resolve conflicting claims from different people that cannot be jointly satisfied because of a scarcity of resources. We consider Michael Otsuka's recent challenge that pairwise comparison leads to intransitive choices for the (someone who believes the numbers should not count in forced choices among lives) and Frances Kamm's responses to Otsuka's challenge. We argue that Kamm's responses do not succeed, but that the threat they are designed to meet is (...)
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  14. Nien-hê Hsieh, Alan Strudler & And David Wasserman (2006). The Numbers Problem. Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (4):352–372.
  15. Nien-Hê Hsieh, Alan Strudler & David Wasserman (2006). The Numbers Problem. Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (4):352 - 372.
  16. Alan Strudler (2005). Deception Unraveled. Journal of Philosophy 102 (9):458 - 473.
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  17. Alan Strudler (2003). On Socially Responsible Investing: A Critical Comment. Journal of Business Ethics 43 (3):215 - 217.
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  18. David T. Wasserman & Alan Strudler (2003). Can a Nonconsequentialist Count Lives? Philosophy and Public Affairs 31 (1):71–94.
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  19. Eric W. Orts & Alan Strudler (2002). The Ethical and Environmental Limits of Stakeholder Theory. Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (2):215-234.
    Abstract: We argue that though stakeholder theory has much to recommend it, particularly as a heuristic for thinking about business firms properly as involving the economic interests of other groups beyond those of the shareholders or other equity owners, the theory is limited by its focus on the interests of human participants in business enterprise. Stakeholder theory runs into intractable philosophical difficulty in providing credible ethical principles for business managers in dealing with some topics, such as the natural environment, that (...)
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  20. Alan Strudler (2002). The Ethical and Environmental Limits of Stakeholder Theory. Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (2):215-233.
    We argue that though stakeholder theory has much to recommend it, particularly as a heuristic for thinking about business firmsproperly as involving the economic interests of other groups beyond those of the shareholders or other equity owners, the theory is limited by its focus on the interests of human participants in business enterprise. Stakeholder theory runs into intractable philosophicaldifficulty in providing credible ethical principles for business managers in dealing with some topics, such as the natural environment,that do not directly involve (...)
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  21. Alan Strudler (1999). Soft Dollars, Moral Costs. Business and Society Review 104 (1):18-20.
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  22. Luis A. Camacho, Colin Campbell, David A. Crocker, Eleonora Curlo, Herman E. Daly, Eliezer Diamond, Robert Goodland, Allen L. Hammond, Nathan Keyfitz, Robert E. Lane, Judith Lichtenberg, David Luban, James A. Nash, Martha C. Nussbaum, ThomasW Pogge, Mark Sagoff, Juliet B. Schor, Michael Schudson, Jerome M. Segal, Amartya Sen, Alan Strudler, Paul L. Wachtel, Paul E. Waggoner, David Wasserman & Charles K. Wilber (1997). Ethics of Consumption: The Good Life, Justice, and Global Stewardship. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  23. Alan Strudler (1997). Cognitive Pathology and Moral Judgment in Managers. Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (4):27-39.
    We examine the moral and managerial significance of some empirical studies in cognitive psychology. We suggest that these results may plausibly be interpreted as expressing deontological commitments of experimental subjects, even though psychologists who discuss the results seem to suppose that they show that people are irrational consequentialists. We argue that the plausibility of our interpretation suggests how managers who wish to take seriously entrenched social views on morality might best craft corporate policy on corporate responsibility, and we suggest that (...)
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  24. Alan Strudler (1995). Justice: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. History of European Ideas 21 (1):146-147.
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  25. Alan Strudler (1995). On the Ethics of Deception in Negotiation. Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (4):805-822.
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  26. Alan Strudler & David Wasserman (1995). The First Dogma of Deontology: The Doctrine of Doing and Allowing and the Notion of a Say. Philosophical Studies 80 (1):51 - 67.
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  27. Alan Strudler (1994). The Social Construction of Genetic Abnormality: Ethical Implications for Managerial Decisions in the Workplace. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 13 (11):839 - 848.
    This paper examines moral issues concerning a firm''s use of genetic information about a prospective employee''s predisposition to contract occupational and other illnesses. It critically reviews leading social construction literature on genetic abnormality and genetic screening, and it examines the relevance of arguments from justice and meritocratic principles. It concludes that there is a strong moral presumption against genetic screening in employment.
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  28. Alan Strudler (1992). Mass Torts and Moral Principles. Law and Philosophy 11 (4):297 - 330.
    This paper examines moral problems that arise when assigning liability in causally problematic mass exposure tort cases. It examines the relevance of different conceptions of corrective justice for such assignments of liability. It explores an analogy between the expressive role of punishment and the expressive role of tort, and argues that the imposition of liability in causally problematic mass exposure cases can be justified by appeal to expressive considerations.
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  29. Alan Strudler (1991). Book Review:Justice and Modern Moral Philosophy. Jeffrey Reiman. [REVIEW] Ethics 101 (4):869-.
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  30. 1Imre Balogh, Brian Beakley, Paul Churchland, Michael Gorman, Stevan Harnad, David Mertz, H. H. Pattee, William Ramsey, John Ringen, Georg Schwarz, Brian Slator, Alan Strudler & Charles Wallis (1990). Responses to 'Computationalism'. Social Epistemology 4 (2):155 – 199.
  31. Alan Strudler (1988). Self-Determination, Incompetence, and Medical Jurisprudence. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 13 (4):349-365.
    Philosophers and others have criticized the courts for ascribing a right of self-determination to severe incompetents. I defend ascription of a right of self-determination to these incompetents against both conceptual and normative attacks. I argue that a court need make no conceptual error when it ascribes a right of self-determination to a being who never had capacity for rational choice, and I argue that proper judicial deference to reflective conventional morality supports ascription of a right of self-determination to severe incompetents. (...)
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  32. Alan Strudler (1987). Tort Theory and Justice. Philosophical Studies 52 (3):411 - 425.
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