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  1. Alasdair Cochrane (2013). Review Animals, Equality and Democracy O'Sullivan Siobhan Palgrave Macmillan Basingstoke, England. Journal of Animal Ethics 3 (1):106-108.
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  2. Alasdair Cochrane (2012). Evaluating 'Bioethical Approaches' to Human Rights. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):309 - 322.
    In recent years there has been growing scholarly interest in the relationship between bioethics and human rights. The majority of this work has proposed that the normative and institutional frameworks of human rights can usefully be employed to address those bioethical controversies that have a global reach: in particular, to the genetic modification of human beings, and to the issue of access to healthcare. In response, a number of critics have urged for a degree of caution about applying human rights (...)
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  3. Alasdair Cochrane (2012). From Human Rights to Sentient Rights. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (5):655-675.
    This article calls for a paradigm shift in the language, theory and practice of human rights: it calls for human rights to be reconceptualized as sentient rights. It argues that human rights are not qualitatively distinct from the basic entitlements of other sentient creatures, and that attempts to differentiate human rights by appealing to something distinctive about humanity, their unique political function or their universality ultimately fail. Finally, the article claims that moving to sentient rights will not lead to intractable (...)
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  4. Alasdair Cochrane (2012). Rex and the City. The Philosophers' Magazine 58:115-116.
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  5. Alasdair Cochrane (2011). An Introduction to Animals and Political Theory. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Introduction : animals and political theory -- Animals in the history of political thought -- Utilitarianism and animals -- Liberalism and animals -- Communitarianism and animals -- Marxism and animals -- Feminism and animals.
     
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  6. Alasdair Cochrane (2010). Undignified Bioethics. Bioethics 24 (5):234-241.
    The concept of dignity is pervasive in bioethics. However, some bioethicists have argued that it is useless on three grounds: that it is indeterminate; that it is reactionary; and that it is redundant. In response, a number of defences of dignity have recently emerged. All of these defences claim that when dignity is suitably clarified, it can be of great use in helping us tackle bioethical controversies. This paper rejects such defences of dignity. It outlines the four most plausible conceptions (...)
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  7. Alasdair Cochrane (2009). Ownership and Justice for Animals. Utilitas 21 (4):424-442.
    This article argues that it is not necessary to abolish all incidents of animal ownership in order to achieve justice for them. It claims that ownership does not grant owners a right to absolute control of their property. Rather, it argues that ownership is a much more qualified concept, conveying different rights in different contexts. With this understanding of ownership in mind, the article argues that it is possible for humans to own animals and at the same time to treat (...)
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  8. Alasdair Cochrane (2007). Animal Rights and Animal Experiments: An Interest-Based Approach. Res Publica 13 (3):293-318.
    This paper examines whether non-human animals have a moral right not to be experimented upon. It adopts a Razian conception of rights, whereby an individual possesses a right if an interest of that individual is sufficient to impose a duty on another. To ascertain whether animals have a right not to be experimented on, three interests are examined which might found such a right: the interest in not suffering, the interest in staying alive, and the interest in being free. It (...)
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  9. Alasdair Cochrane, Environmental Ethics. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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