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  1. Alastair Butler (2011). Semantically Restricted Argument Dependencies. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 20 (1):69-114.
    This paper presents a new take on how argument dependencies in natural language are established and constrained. The paper starts with a rather standard view that (quantificational) argument dependencies are operator-variable dependencies. The interesting twist the paper offers is to eliminate the need for syntax that serves to enforce what the operator-variable dependencies are. Instead the role of ensuring grammatical and generally unambiguous forms is taken up by semantics imposing what are dependency requirements for any interpretation to go through at (...)
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  2. Alastair Butler, Chidori Nakamura & Kei Yoshimoto (2009). Topic/Subject Coreference in the Hierarchy of Japanese Complex Sentences. In Hattori (ed.), New Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence. Springer. 119--132.
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  3. Alastair Butler (2008). Coordinating and Subordinating Dependencies. In Satoh (ed.), New Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence. Springer. 149--159.
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  4. Alastair Butler (2007). Scope Control and Grammatical Dependencies. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 16 (3):241-264.
    This paper develops a semantics with control over scope relations using Vermeulen’s stack valued assignments as information states. This makes available a limited form of scope reuse and name switching. The goal is to have a general system that fixes available scoping effects to those that are characteristic of natural language. The resulting system is called Scope Control Theory, since it provides a theory about what scope has to be like in natural language. The theory is shown to replicate a (...)
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  5. Alastair Butler (2004). The Syntax and Semantics of Split Constructions: A Comparative Study. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Split constructions are widespread in natural languages. The separation of the semantic restriction of a quantifier from that quantifier is a typical example of such a construction. This study addresses the problem that such discontinuous strings exhibit--namely, a number of locality constraints, including intervention effects. These are shown to follow from the interaction of a minimalist syntax with a semantics that directly assigns a model-theoretic interpretation to syntactic logical forms. The approach is shown to have wide empirical coverage and a (...)
     
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