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  1.  21
    Alejo José G. Sison & Joan Fontrodona (2012). The Common Good of the Firm in the Aristotelian-Thomistic Tradition. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):211-246.
    This article proposes a theory of the firm based on the common good. It clarifies the meaning of the term “common good” tracing its historical development. Next, an analogous sense applicable to the firm is derived from its original context in political theory. Put simply, the common good of the firm is the production of goods and services needed for flourishing, in which different members participate through work. This is linked to the political common good through subsidiarity. Lastly, implications and (...)
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  2.  7
    Ignacio Ferrero & Alejo José G. Sison (2014). A Quantitative Analysis of Authors, Schools and Themes in Virtue Ethics Articles in Business Ethics and Management Journals. [REVIEW] Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (4):375-400.
    Virtue ethics is generally recognized as one of the three major schools of ethics, but is often waylaid by utilitarianism and deontology in business and management literature. EBSCO and ABI databases were used to look for articles in the Journal of Citation Reports publications between 1980 and 2011 containing the keywords ‘virtue ethics’, ‘virtue theory’, or ‘virtuousness’ in the abstract and ‘business’ or ‘management’ in the text. The search was refined to draw lists of the most prolific authors, the most (...)
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  3. Alejo José G. Sison (2007). Toward a Common Good Theory of the Firm: The Tasubinsa Case. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):471 - 480.
    Tasubinsa is a "Special Employment and Occupational Center" constituted in accordance with Spanish Law where 90% of the workers have mental, sensorial or physical impairments of at least 30%. Its positive experience of more than 15 years provides entirely different responses from mainstream neoclassical theory (transaction cost theory, agency theory, and shareholder theory) to basic questions such as "What is a firm?", "What is its purpose?", "Who owns a firm?", and "What do a firm's owners seek?". (...)
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  4.  9
    Alejo José G. Sison & Joan Fontrodona (2013). Participating in the Common Good of the Firm. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (4):611-625.
    In a previous essay (Sison and Fontrodona 2012), we defined the common good of the firm as collaborative work, insofar as it provides, first, an opportunity to develop knowledge, skills, virtues, and meaning (work as praxis), and second, inasmuch as it produces goods and services to satisfy society’s needs and wants (work as poiesis). We would now like to focus on the participatory aspect of this common good. To do so, we will have to identify the different members of the (...)
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  5.  62
    Joan Fontrodona & Alejo José G. Sison (2006). The Nature of the Firm, Agency Theory and Shareholder Theory: A Critique From Philosophical Anthropology. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 66 (1):33 - 42.
    Standard accounts on the nature of the firm are highly dependent on explanations by Coase, coupled with inputs from agency theory and shareholder theory. This paper carries out their critique in light of personalist and common good postulates. It shows how personalist and common good principles create a framework that not only accommodates business ethics better but also affords a more compelling understanding of business as a whole.
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  6.  3
    Alejo José G. Sison & Ignacio Ferrero (2015). How Different is Neo‐Aristotelian Virtue From Positive Organizational Virtuousness? Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (S2):78-98.
    The purpose of this article is to explain the differences between neo-Aristotelian virtue and positive organizational virtuousness from the virtue ethics perspective. Most studies use virtues and virtuousness interchangeably. A few others try to explain their differences from the positive organizational science perspective. Although closely related, we believe that these two notions are not identical. If we understand neo-Aristotelian virtue correctly, then it cannot be judged exclusively on what is externally verifiable, as is the case with virtuousness. For these reasons, (...)
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  7.  11
    Alejo José G. Sison & Joan Fontrodona (2011). The Common Good of Business: Addressing a Challenge Posed by «Caritas in Veritate». [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (S1):99-107.
    Caritas in Veritate (CV) poses a challenge to the business community when it asks for “a profoundly new way of understanding business enterprise” (CV 40). The paper proposes the concept of the “common good” as a starting point for the discussion and sketches a definition of the common good of business as the path toward an answer for this challenge. Building on the distinction between the material and the formal parts of the common good, the authors characterize profit as the (...)
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  8.  17
    Alejo José G. Sison (2009). From CSR to Corporate Citizenship: Anglo-American and Continental European Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):235 - 246.
    Beginning with the question of who constitutes the firm, this article seeks to explore the historical evolution of concepts such as corporate social responsibility, corporate accountability, corporate social responsiveness, corporate social performance, stakeholder theory, and corporate citizenship. In close parallel to these changes are differences in interpretation from Anglo—American and Continental European perspectives. The author defends that the ultimate reasons behind these differences are of a philosophical nature, affecting both the anthropology and the political theory dominant in each of these (...)
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  9. Alejo José G. Sison, Edwin M. Hartman & Joan Fontrodona (2012). Guest Editor's Introduction: Reviving Tradition: Virtue and the Common Good in Business and Management. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):207-210.
    Virtue ethics, the authors believe, is distinct and superior to other options because it considers, in the first place, which preferences are worth pursuing, rather than just blindly maximizing preferences, and it takes into account intuitions, emotions and experience, instead of acting solely on abstract universal principles. Moreover, virtue ethics is seen as firmly rooted in human biology and psychology, particularly in our freedom, rationality, and sociability. Work, business, and management are presented as vital areas for the development of virtues, (...)
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  10.  11
    Antonino Vaccaro & Alejo José G. Sison (2011). Transparency in Business: The Perspective of Catholic Social Teaching and the “Caritas in Veritate”. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (S1):17-27.
    Transparency in business and society is one of the challenges raised in the encyclical Caritas in Veritate by Benedict XVI. This paper focuses on the issue by extending the literature on business ethics, corporate social responsibility, and corporate transparency in two dimensions. First, it reviews the understanding and framing of the transparency issue in Caritas in Veritate and in a selection of relevant Catholic Social Teaching (CST) publications. Second, this paper provides normative indications for corporate transparency decisions which reflect four (...)
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  11.  1
    Alejo José G. Sisón (2011). Aristotelian Citizenship and Corporate Citizenship: Who is a Citizen of the Corporate Polis? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (1):3 - 9.
    After defining the essential elements of Aristotelian citizenship, the article proposes to apply these criteria in its search for the equivalent of a citizen within the corporate polis. It argues that shareholding managers are the best positioned among a firm's constituents or stakeholders in fulfilling the role of corporate citizens. Greater participation by management not only in the control but also in the ownership of firms brings about benefits for the firm as a whole and for the managers themselves, as (...)
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  12.  6
    Alejo José G. Sison (2000). The Cultural Dimension of Codes of Corporate Governance: A Focus on the Olivencia Report. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):181 - 192.
    The article deals with the sociocultural and historical background of the Olivencia Report and relates this to the document's content, particularly, to its recommendations for Spanish Boards. A discussion of the distinctively Spanish understandings of loyalty, due diligence and transparency is included. The work ends with insights into parallelisms between corporate governance and political government, specifically on the role of culture, democratic representation and accountability, the distribution of power, the protection of property rights and equality.
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  13.  3
    Ron Beadle, Alejo José G. Sison & Joan Fontrodona (2015). Introduction‐Virtue and Virtuousness: When Will the Twain Ever Meet? Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (S2):67-77.
    This paper introduces ‘Virtue and Virtuousness: When will the twain ever meet?’ a special edition of Business Ethics: A European Review. The Call for Papers invited contributions that could inform the relationship between organisational virtuousness, as conceptualised by positive organisation studies, and the classical conception of virtues pertaining to individual women and men. While the resources of particular virtue traditions – Aristotelian, Catholic, Confucian, and the like – could inform their own debates as to whether virtue extends beyond individuals, the (...)
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  14.  39
    Alejo José G. Sison & Antonette Palma- Angeles (1997). Business Ethics in the Philippines. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (14):1519-1528.
    The plurality of languages and ethnicities, the geographic fragmentation, the predominant Roman Catholic religion, together with the still relatively short experience in nationhood account for a very peculiar understanding of "business ethics" in the Philippines. The rapid growth and liberalization of the economy, coupled with the inequitable distribution of wealth, the destruction of the environment and corruption are the main ethical concerns. Businesspersons and the academe endeavor to find creative solutions for these unique challenges.
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  15.  3
    Alejo José G. Sison & Joana Fontrodona (2015). The Neglected Ethical and Spiritual Motivations in the Workplace. Journal of Business Ethics 128 (4):803-816.
    Understanding what motivates employees is essential to the success of organizational objectives. Therefore, properly capturing and explaining the full range of such motivations are important. However, the classical and most popular theories describing employee motives have neglected, if not omitted entirely, the importance of the ethical and spiritual dimensions of motivation. This has led to a model of a person as self-interested, amoral, and non-spiritual. In this paper, we attempt to expose this omission and offer a more complete taxonomy of (...)
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  16. Alejo José G. Sison (2007). Toward a Common Good Theory of the Firm: The Tasubinsa Case. Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):471-480.
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  17. Joan Fontrodona & Alejo José G. Sison (2006). The Nature of the Firm, Agency Theory and Shareholder Theory: A Critique From Philosophical Anthropology. Journal of Business Ethics 66 (1):33-42.
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  18.  8
    Joan Fontrodona, Alejo José G. Sison & Boudewijn de Bruin (2013). Editorial Introduction: Putting Virtues Into Practice. A Challenge for Business and Organizations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (4):563-565.
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  19.  2
    Alejo José G. Sison (2006). Tiempo, Capital y Capital Humano. In Rafael Alvira, Héctor Ghiretti & Montserrat Herrero López (eds.), La Experiencia Social Del Tiempo. Ediciones Universidad de Navarra
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  20.  17
    Mahmut Arslan & Alejo José G. Sison (2009). Foreword: Professional Ethics in Business and Social Life. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):1 -.
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  21.  9
    Alejo José G. Sison & Joan Fontrodona (2009). Corporate Governance in IDOM. International Corporate Responsibility Series 4:119-128.
    Aristotle indicates that although a monarchy is the best form of government in theory, in practice, a polity (“mixed regime”) is best. IDOM Engineering Consultancy is presented as an example of a “corporate polity.” In this case study, stories and rationales behind the institutionalization of worker participation in ownership and management are discussed. Arguments in favor of the corporate common good as the firm’s overarching concern are proffered. Legal challenges as well as those arising from the company’s growth and overseas (...)
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  22.  1
    Alejo José G. Sison & Joana Fontrodona (2015). Work, Virtues, and Flourishing: A Special Issue From the EBEN 25th Annual Conference. Journal of Business Ethics 128 (4):701-703.
    The paper is the introduction to a selection of papers submitted to the EBEN 25th Annual Conference which took place at IESE Business School in Barcelona from September 20 to 22, 2012. The text presents the rationale behind the program of the Conference, and summarizes the content of the selected papers.
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  23.  3
    Alejo José G. Sison, Edwin M. Hartman & Joan Fontrodona (2012). Guest Editor's Introduction: Reviving Tradition. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):207-210.
    Virtue ethics, the authors believe, is distinct and superior to other options because it considers, in the first place, which preferences are worth pursuing, rather than just blindly maximizing preferences, and it takes into account intuitions, emotions and experience, instead of acting solely on abstract universal principles. Moreover, virtue ethics is seen as firmly rooted in human biology and psychology, particularly in our freedom, rationality, and sociability. Work, business, and management are presented as vital areas for the development of virtues, (...)
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  24. Mahmut Arslan & Alejo José G. Sison (2009). Foreword: Professional Ethics in Business and Social Life. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):1-1.
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  25. Alejo José G. Sison (2011). Aristotelian Citizenship and Corporate Citizenship: Who is a Citizen of the Corporate Polis? Journal of Business Ethics 100 (1):3-9.
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