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  1. Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley (2013). Plural Logic. Oxford University Press.
    Alex Oliver and Timothy Smiley provide a new account of plural logic. They argue that there is such a thing as genuinely plural denotation in logic, and expound a framework of ideas that includes the distinction between distributive and collective predicates, the theory of plural descriptions, multivalued functions, and lists.
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  2. Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley (2013). Zilch. Analysis 73 (4):601-613.
    We all learn about the mistake of treating ‘nothing’ as if it were a term standing for something; but is it a mistake to treat it as an empty term, denoting nothing? We argue not, and we introduce ‘zilch’, defined as ‘the non-self-identical thing’, as a term which is empty as a matter of logical necessity. We contrast its behaviour with that of the quantifier ‘nothing’, and illustrate its uses. We use the same idea to vindicate Locke’s, Descartes’ and Hume’s (...)
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  3. Alex Oliver (2010). The Matter of Form : Logic's Beginnings. In T. J. Smiley, Jonathan Lear & Alex Oliver (eds.), The Force of Argument: Essays in Honor of Timothy Smiley. Routledge.
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  4. T. J. Smiley, Jonathan Lear & Alex Oliver (eds.) (2010). The Force of Argument: Essays in Honor of Timothy Smiley. Routledge.
    Timothy Smiley has made ground-breaking contributions to modal logic, free logic, multiple-conclusion logic, and plural logic; he has illuminated Aristotle’s syllogistic, the ideas of logical form and consequence, and the distinction between assertion and rejection; and his debunking work on the theory of descriptions is a tour de force. In this volume, an international roster of contributors discuss Smiley's work to date; their essays will be of significant interest to those working across the logical spectrum—in philosophy of language, philosophical logic (...)
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  5. Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley (2009). Sharvy's Theory of Descriptions: A Paradigm Subverted. Analysis 69 (3):412-421.
  6. Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley (2008). Is Plural Denotation Collective? Analysis 68 (297):22–34.
  7. Dominic Scott, Alex Oliver & Miguel Ley-Pineda, Trade Marks as Property: A Philosophical Perspective.
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  8. Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley (2007). Erata: What Are Sets and What Are They For? Noûs 41 (2):354 -.
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  9. Kit Fine, Jane Heal, Jennifer Hornsby, Keith Hossack, April Jones, Mark Kalderon, Guy Longworth, Mike Martin, Joseph Melia & Alex Oliver (2006). Fraser MacBride. In Barry C. Smith (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press.
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  10. Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley (2006). A Modest Logic of Plurals. Journal of Philosophical Logic 35 (3):317 - 348.
    We present a plural logic that is as expressively strong as it can be without sacrificing axiomatisability, axiomatise it, and use it to chart the expressive limits set by axiomatisability. To the standard apparatus of quantification using singular variables our object-language adds plural variables, a predicate expressing inclusion (is/are/is one of/are among), and a plural definite description operator. Axiomatisability demands that plural variables only occur free, but they have a surprisingly important role. Plural description is not eliminable in favour of (...)
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  11. Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley (2006). What Are Sets and What Are They For? Philosophical Perspectives 20 (1):123–155.
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  12. Alex Oliver (2005). The Reference Principle. Analysis 65 (287):177–187.
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  13. Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley (2005). Plural Descriptions and Many-Valued Functions. Mind 114 (456):1039-1068.
    Russell had two theories of definite descriptions: one for singular descriptions, another for plural descriptions. We chart its development, in which ‘On Denoting’ plays a part but not the part one might expect, before explaining why it eventually fails. We go on to consider many-valued functions, since they too bring in plural terms—terms such as ‘4’ or the descriptive ‘the inhabitants of London’ which, like plain plural descriptions, stand for more than one thing. Logicians need to take plural reference seriously (...)
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  14. Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley (2004). Multigrade Predicates. Mind 113 (452):609-681.
    The history of the idea of predicate is the history of its emancipation. The lesson of this paper is that there are two more steps to take. The first is to recognize that predicates need not have a fixed degree, the second that they can combine with plural terms. We begin by articulating the notion of a multigrade predicate: one that takes variably many arguments. We counter objections to the very idea posed by Peirce, Dummett's Frege, and Strawson. We show (...)
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  15. Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley (2001). Strategies for a Logic of Plurals. Philosophical Quarterly 51 (204):289-306.
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  16. Alex Oliver (2000). A Realistic Rationalism? Inquiry 43 (1):111 – 135.
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  17. Alex Oliver (2000). Logic, Mathematics, and Philosophy: Review of G. Boolos, Logic, Logic, and Logic. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (4):857-873.
  18. Alex Oliver (2000). Logic, Mathematics and Philosophy1. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51:4.
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  19. Alex Oliver & Alexius Schmeinong (2000). Ghost Writers. Analysis 60 (4):371–371.
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  20. Alex Oliver (1999). A Few More Remarks on Logical Form. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 99 (3):247–272.
    Yah boo sucks to the grammer wot we lernt in skool! Grammar (and the bad old traditional logic) says that quantifier phrases such as 'nobody', 'everyone', 'all women', 'some men' and 'a man' are in the same category as names such as 'Milly', 'Molly' and 'Mandy'. So, prior to their first corrective lessons, students are awfully muddled, the first and fundamental problem being the Woozle hunt for somebody called 'nobody'. Hoorah for modern logic and logic teachers! The story used to (...)
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  21. Alex Oliver (1998). A World of States of Affairs. Journal of Philosophy 95 (10):535-540.
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  22. Alex Oliver (1998). Hazy Totalities and Indefinitely Extensible Concepts. Grazer Philosophische Studien 55:25-50.
    Dummctt argues that classical quantification is illegitimate when the domain is given as the objects which fall under an indefinitely extensible concept, since in such cases the objects are not the required definite totality. The chief problem in understanding this complex argument is the crucial but unexplained phrase 'definite totality' and the associated claim that it follows from the intuitive notion of set that the objects over which a classical quantifier ranges form a set. 'Definite totality' is best understood as (...)
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  23. D. H. Mellor & Alex Oliver (eds.) (1997). Properties. Oxford University Press.
    When we say a certain rose is red, we seem to be attributing a property, redness, to it. But are there really such properties? If so, what are they like, how do we know about them, and how are they related to the objects which have them and the linguistic devices which we use to talk about them? This collection presents these ancient problems in a modern light. In particular, it makes accessible for the first time the most important contributions (...)
     
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  24. Alex Oliver (1996). The Metaphysics of Properties. Mind 105 (417):1-80.
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  25. Alex Oliver (1994). Are Subclasses Parts of Classes? Analysis 54 (4):215 - 223.
    The fundamental thesis of David Lewis's "Parts of Classes" is that the nonempty subsets of a set are mereological parts of it. This paper shows that Lewis's considerations in favor of this thesis are unpersuasive. First, common speech provides no support. Second, the formal analogy between mereology and the Boolean algebra of sets can be explained without accepting the thesis. Third, it is very doubtful that the thesis is fruitful. Certainly, Lewis's claim that it helps us understand set theory is (...)
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  26. Alex Oliver (1994). Dummett and Frege on the Philosophy of Mathematics. Inquiry 37 (3):349 – 392.
  27. Alex Oliver (1994). Frege and Dummett Are Two. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (174):74-82.
    In "Frege: Philosophy of Mathematics" Dummett recommends the following thesis, (PNP): the correct analysis of any sentence containing a plural noun phrase will show that the phrase is functioning predictively. According to Dummett, (PNP), applied to numerical predications such as the leaves are 1,000' is the key premise in Frege's argument against Mill's theory of numbers. But Frege never subscribed to (PNP) and he rejected such numerical predications, and point out how Frege's own semantic theory for plural noun phrases obscures (...)
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  28. Alex Oliver (1993). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Mind 102 (407):497-500.
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  29. Alex Oliver (1993). Classes and Goodman's Nominalism. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 93:179 - 191.
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  30. Alex Oliver (1992). Could There Be Conjunctive Universals? Analysis 52 (2):88 - 97.
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  31. Alex Oliver (1992). Donald Davidson. Philosophical Books 33 (3):148-150.
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  32. Alex Oliver (1992). The Metaphysics of Singletons. Mind 101 (401):129-140.
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