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  1. Zhisong Wang & Alexander Maier, Home Journals About Us.
    We propose an empirical mode decomposition (EMD-) based method to extract features from the multichannel recordings of local field potential (LFP), collected from the middle temporal (MT) visual cortex in a macaque monkey, for decoding its bistable structure-from-motion (SFM) perception. The feature extraction approach consists of three stages. First, we employ EMD to decompose nonstationary single-trial time series into narrowband components called intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) with time scales dependent on the data. Second, we adopt unsupervised K-means clustering to group (...)
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  2. K. Moutoussis, Alexander Maier, Semir Zeki & Nikos K. Logothetis (2005). Seeing Invisible Motion: Responses of Area V5 Neurons in the Awake-Behaving Macaque. Soc. For Neurosci. Abstr 390 (11).
    Moutoussis, K., A. Maier, S. Zeki and N. K. Logothetis: Seeing invisible motion: responses of area V5 neurons in the awake-behaving macaque. Soc. for Neurosci. Abstr. 390.11, 1 (11 2005) Abstract.
     
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  3. David A. Leopold, Alexander Maier & Nikos K. Logothetis (2003). Measuring Subjective Visual Perception in the Nonhuman Primate. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (9-10):115-130.
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  4. Alexander Maier, Melanie Wilke, Nikos K. Logothetis & David A. Leopold (2003). Perception of Temporally Interleaved Ambiguous Patterns. Current Biology.
    Background: Continuous viewing of ambiguous patterns is characterized by wavering perception that alternates between two or more equally valid visual solutions. However, when such patterns are viewed intermittently, either by repetitive presentation or by periodic closing of the eyes, perception can become locked or "frozen" in one configuration for several minutes at a time. One aspect of this stabilization is the possible existence of a perceptual memory that persists during periods in which the ambiguous stimulus is absent. Here, we use (...)
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  5. David A. Leopold, Melanie Wilke, Alexander Maier & Nikos K. Logothetis (2002). Stable Perception of Visually Ambiguous Patterns. Nature Neuroscience 5 (6):605-609.
    Correspondence should be addressed to David A. Leopold david.leopold@tuebingen.mpg.deDuring the viewing of certain patterns, widely known as ambiguous or puzzle figures, perception lapses into a sequence of spontaneous alternations, switching every few seconds between two or more visual interpretations of the stimulus. Although their nature and origin remain topics of debate, these stochastic switches are generally thought to be the automatic and inevitable consequence of viewing a pattern without a unique solution. We report here that in humans such perceptual alternations (...)
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