Search results for 'Alexander of Lycopolis' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  10
    Alexander of Lycopolis (1974). An Alexandrian Platonist Against Dualism: Alexander of Lycopolis' Treatise "Critique of the Doctrines of Manichaeus". Brill.
    Introduction 1. Alexander in Modern Scholarship; The Present Translation The anti-Manichaean treatise of Alexander of Lycopolis has for a long time been ...
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  2. David Gorman & F. Matthias Alexander (2000). Réflexions Sur Nos Réflexions Sur Nous-Mêmes Conférence En Mémoire de F.M. Alexander Par Devant la Society of Teachers of the Alexander Technique, 27th Octobre, 1984. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  3. David Gorman & F. Matthias Alexander (2000). Thinking About Thinking About Ourselves the F.M. Alexander Memorial Lecture, Delivered Before the Society of Teachers of the Alexander Technique, on October 27th 1984. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  4. F. Matthias Alexander (1974/1986). The Resurrection of the Body: The Essential Writings of F. Matthias Alexander. Distributed in the U.S. By Random House.
     
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  5.  13
    Thomas M. Alexander (2008). The Life and Work of Hartley Burr Alexander. The Pluralist 3 (1):1 - 10.
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  6. Patrick Proctor Alexander (1866/1975). Mill and Carlyle: An Examination of Mr. John Stuart Mill's Doctrine of Causation in Relation to Moral Freedom with an Occasional Discourse on Sauerteig by Smelfungus [I.E. P. P. Alexander]. [REVIEW] Norwood Editions.
  7.  15
    Thomas M. Alexander (1987). John Dewey's Theory of Art, Experience, and Nature: The Horizons of Feeling. State University of New York Press.
    Thomas Alexander shows that the primary, guiding concern of Dewey's philosophy is his theory of aesthetic experience.
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  8. Jason McKenzie Alexander, Johannes Himmelreich & Christopher Thompson (2015). Epistemic Landscapes, Optimal Search, and the Division of Cognitive Labor. Philosophy of Science 82 (3):424-453.
    This article examines two questions about scientists’ search for knowledge. First, which search strategies generate discoveries effectively? Second, is it advantageous to diversify search strategies? We argue pace Weisberg and Muldoon, “Epistemic Landscapes and the Division of Cognitive Labor”, that, on the first question, a search strategy that deliberately seeks novel research approaches need not be optimal. On the second question, we argue they have not shown epistemic reasons exist for the division of cognitive labor, identifying the errors that led (...)
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  9. Larry Alexander (2001). The Rule of Rules: Morality, Rules, and the Dilemmas of Law. Duke University Press.
    In "The Rule of Rules" Larry Alexander and Emily Sherwin examine this dilemma.
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  10. Larry Alexander (2008). Is There a Right of Freedom of Expression? Law and Philosophy 27 (1):97-104.
    In this provocative book, Alexander offers a sceptical appraisal of the claim that freedom of expression is a human right. He examines the various contexts in which a right to freedom of expression might be asserted and concludes that such a right cannot be supported in any of these contexts. He argues that some legal protection of freedom of expression is surely valuable, though the form such protection will take will vary with historical and cultural circumstances and is not (...)
     
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  11. Larry Alexander, Kimberly Kessler Ferzan & Stephen J. Morse (2012). Crime and Culpability: A Theory of Criminal Law. Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a comprehensive overview of what the criminal law would look like if organised around the principle that those who deserve punishment should receive punishment commensurate with, but no greater than, that which they deserve. Larry Alexander and Kimberly Kessler Ferzan argue that desert is a function of the actor's culpability, and that culpability is a function of the risks of harm to protected interests that the actor believes he is imposing and his reasons for acting (...)
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  12. Larry Alexander, Kimberly Kessler Ferzan & Stephen J. Morse (2009). Crime and Culpability: A Theory of Criminal Law. Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a comprehensive overview of what the criminal law would look like if organised around the principle that those who deserve punishment should receive punishment commensurate with, but no greater than, that which they deserve. Larry Alexander and Kimberly Kessler Ferzan argue that desert is a function of the actor's culpability, and that culpability is a function of the risks of harm to protected interests that the actor believes he is imposing and his reasons for acting (...)
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  13. Larry Alexander (2010). Is There a Right of Freedom of Expression? Cambridge University Press.
    In this provocative book, Alexander offers a sceptical appraisal of the claim that freedom of expression is a human right. He examines the various contexts in which a right to freedom of expression might be asserted and concludes that such a right cannot be supported in any of these contexts. He argues that some legal protection of freedom of expression is surely valuable, though the form such protection will take will vary with historical and cultural circumstances and is not (...)
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  14. Larry Alexander (2005). Is There a Right of Freedom of Expression? Cambridge University Press.
    In this provocative book, Alexander offers a sceptical appraisal of the claim that freedom of expression is a human right. He examines the various contexts in which a right to freedom of expression might be asserted and concludes that such a right cannot be supported in any of these contexts. He argues that some legal protection of freedom of expression is surely valuable, though the form such protection will take will vary with historical and cultural circumstances and is not (...)
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  15. Jeffrey Alexander & Dmitry Kurakin (2010). On the Intellectual Origins of “Strong Program”. Russian Sociological Review 9 (2):5-10.
    In the short preface to the special issue of “Sociological Review” one of the key contemporary sociologists, Jeffrey Alexander, casts a look on the intellectual origins of so called “strong program” in cultural sociology. In particular, Alexander directs his attention to Dilthey’s hermeneutical project which was developed further in the works of Ricouer. Alexander shows briefly that in the masterpieces of classical sociology, i.e. in the famous Weber’s book “The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit (...)
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  16.  8
    G. J. P. O'Daly (1977). P. W. Van der Horst and J. Mansfeld: An Alexandrian Platonist Against Dualism: Alexander of Lycopolis' Treatise 'Critique of the Doctrines of Manichaeus'. Translated with an Introduction and Notes. Pp. 99. Leiden: Brill, 1974. Paper, Fl.24. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 27 (02):292-293.
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  17. Susanne Bobzien (2014). Alexander of Aphrodisias on Aristotle's Theory of the Stoic Indemonstrables. In M. Lee (ed.), Strategies of Argument: Essays in Ancient Ethics, Epistemology, and Logic. OUP 199-227.
    ABSTRACT: Alexander of Aphrodisias’ commentaries on Aristotle’s Organon are valuable sources for both Stoic and early Peripatetic logic, and have often been used as such – in particular for early Peripatetic hypothetical syllogistic and Stoic propositional logic. By contrast, this paper explores the role Alexander himself played in the development and transmission of those theories. There are three areas in particular where he seems to have made a difference: First, he drew a connection between certain passages (...)
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  18.  30
    Miira Tuominen (2010). Receptive Reason: Alexander of Aphrodisias on Material Intellect. Phronesis 55 (2):170-190.
    According to Alexander of Aphrodisias, our potential intellect is a purely receptive capacity. Alexander also claims that, in order for us to actualise our intellectual potentiality, the intellect needs to abstract what is intelligible from enmattered perceptible objects. Now a problem emerges: How is it possible for a purely receptive capacity to perform such an abstraction? It will be argued that even though Alexander's reaction to this question causes some tension in his theory, the philosophical motivation for (...)
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  19.  15
    Jonathan Barnes & Susanne Bobzien (1991). Alexander of Aphrodisias' on Aristotle's Prior Analytics 1.1-7. Duckworth.
    ABSTRACT: English translation of the 2nd/3rd century Peripatetic Philosopher's Alexander of Aphrodisias commentary on Aristotle's non-modal syllogistic, i.e. on one of the most influential logical texts of all times. -/- Volume includes introduction on Alexander of Aphrodisias and the early commentators, translation with notes and comments, appendices with a new translation of Aristotle's text, a summary of Aristotle's non-modal syllogistic and textual notes.
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  20. J. A. Towey (2000). Alexander of Aphrodisias On Aristotle On Sense Perception. Duckworth.
    The first English translation of the commentary of Alexander of Aphrodisias on Aristotle's De Sensu.With notes.
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  21.  12
    Andrew Rosato (2013). The Interpretation of Anselm's Teaching on Christ's Satisfaction for Sin in the Franciscan Tradition From Alexander of Hales to Duns Scotus. Franciscan Studies 71 (1):411-444.
    Anselm’s Cur Deus homo [CDH hereafter] covers a number of topics related to the doctrine of redemption, but its main contribution to that doctrine is its account of how Christ’s death makes satisfaction for human sin. Anselm’s concept of satisfaction is correlated with his understanding of sin. According to Anselm, sin incurs a debt that one pays by making satisfaction. Anselm’s satisfaction theory of the Atonement came to dominate soteriology in the scholastic period. Despite numerous quotations from and references to (...)
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  22. Gweltaz Guyomarc'H. (2013). Review of V. Caston (Trans.) Alexander of Aphrodisias: On the Soul. Part I. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (02):400-402.
  23.  12
    Kevin L. Flannery (ed.) (1995). Ways Into the Logic of Alexander of Aphrodisias. E.J. Brill.
    Ways into the Logic of Alexander of Aphrodisias is intended to give an overview of the logic of Alexander of Aphrodisias (fl. early third century A D). Since ...
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  24.  11
    Luca Gili (2014). Alexander of Aphrodisias and the Heterodox Dictum de Omni Et de Nullo. History and Philosophy of Logic 36 (2):114-128.
    Aristotle's explanation of what is said ‘of every’ and ‘of none’ has been interpreted either as involving individuals, or as regarding exclusively universal terms. I claim that Alexander of Aphrodisias endorsed this latter interpretation of the dictum de omni et de nullo. This interpretation affects our understanding of Alexander's syllogistic: as a matter of fact, Alexander maintained that the dictum de omni et de nullo is one of the core principles of syllogistic.
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  25.  18
    Kevin Flannery (1993). Alexander of Aphrodisias and Others on a Controversial Demonstration in Aristotle's Modal Syllogistic. History and Philosophy of Logic 14 (2):201-214.
    (1993). Alexander of aphrodisias and others on a controversial demonstration in aristotle’s modal syllogistic. History and Philosophy of Logic: Vol. 14, No. 2, pp. 201-214.
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  26.  9
    Victoria Voytko (1998). Ways Into the Logic of Alexander of Aphrodisias. Review of Metaphysics 52 (1):145-146.
    This study of three central themes in the logic of Alexander of Aphrodisias, the greatest of the ancient Aristotelian commentators, provides insight not only into Aristotle's logical writings but also into the tradition of scholarship which they spawned.
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  27.  13
    Alexander (2001). Alexander of Aphrodisias on the Cosmos. Brill Academic Pub.
    This volume contains the Arabic translations of a lost treatise by Alexander of Aphrodisias (c. AD 200) "On the Principles of the Universe" with English translation, introduction and commentary. It also includes an Arabic and Syriac glossary. The introduction and commentary deal in detail with the manuscripts, the translators and the exegetical tendencies of the text, as well as with its reception in Arabic philosophy. The main theme of the work is the motion of the heavenly bodies and their (...)
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  28.  87
    A. R. J. Fisher (2015). Samuel Alexander's Theory of Categories. The Monist 98 (3):246-67.
    Samuel Alexander was one of the first realists of the twentieth century to defend a theory of categories. He thought that the categories are genuinely real and grounded in the intrinsic nature of Space-Time. I present his reduction of the categories in terms of Space-Time, articulate his account of categorial structure and completeness, and offer an interpretation of what he thought the nature of the categories really were. I then argue that his theory of categories has some advantages (...)
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  29.  23
    Luis Xavier López-Farjeat (2007). Determinism and Free Will in Alexander of Aphrodisias and the Arabic Tradition. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 81:161-177.
    The Arabic tradition knew Alexander’s treatises On Fate and On Providence. Alexander criticizes the Stoic determinism with some peripatetic arguments. In those treatises we can find, at least, two positions: the peripatetic and “libertarian” position represented by Alexander, and Stoic determinism. A very similar discussion can be found in Islamic tradition. As S. Van den Bergh has insisted, Islamic theological schools had some Stoic influences. One of the issues in which we can find some common views is, (...)
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  30.  64
    Robin Smith (1998). Ways Into the Logic of Alexander of Aphrodisias. Ancient Philosophy 18 (1):206-210.
    This study of three central themes in the logic of Alexander of Aphrodisias, the greatest of the ancient Aristotelian commentators, provides insight not only into Aristotle's logical writings but also into the tradition of scholarship which they spawned.
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  31.  42
    Robert B. Todd (1976). Alexander of Aphrodisias on Stoic Physics: A Study of the De Mixtione with Preliminary Essays, Text, Translation and Commentary. Brill.
    PART ONE ALEXANDER OF APHRODISIAS— AN INTRODUCTION A study of a work by Alexander of Aphrodisias must be prefaced by some general introduction to the author ...
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  32.  24
    R. W. Sharples (2005). Alexander of Aphrodisias on Universals: Two Problematic Texts. Phronesis 50 (1):43 - 55.
    Two texts that raise problems for Alexander of Aphrodisias' theory of universals are examined. "De anima" 90.2-8 appears to suggest that universals are dependent on thought for their existence; this raises questions about the status both of universals and of forms. It is suggested that the passage is best interpreted as indicating that universals are dependent on thought only for their being recognised as universals. The last sentence of "Quaestio" 1.11 seems to assert that if the universal did not (...)
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  33.  26
    Silvia Fazzo & Hillary Wiesiner (1993). Alexander of Aphrodisias in the Kindī-Cricle and in Al-Kindī' Cosmology. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 3 (1):119.
    How do the heavenly bodies physically affect the sublunary world? On this topic, the few fragmentary statements by Aristotle were refined and expanded by his Greek commentator Alexander of Aphrodisias. In the Kind-circle adaptations of Alexander and al-Kind-circle's Alexander was closely followed by al-Kind himself exerted a reciprocal influence on the Arabic Alexander, who was largely the product of his own group of translators. The appendix contains English translations from Arabic of two adapted Alexander's treatises.
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  34.  14
    Ivars Avotins (1980). Alexander of Aphrodisias on Vision in the Atomists. Classical Quarterly 30 (02):429-.
    In discussing the atomists' theory of vision modern accounts have quite neglected to take into account two sections of Alexander of Aphrodisias on this topic. Nearly identical in length and content, they contain objections to the atomist theory of vision by means of the . In form they consist of a series of questions purporting to contain atomist doctrine. Each question is followed by objections to its subject-matter. Most of the questions contain doctrine known to us already from other (...)
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  35.  13
    Jan Opsomer & Bob Sharples (2000). Alexander of Aphrodisias, De Intellectu 110.4: 'I Heard This From Aristotle'. A Modest Proposal. Classical Quarterly 50 (01):252-.
    The treatise De intellectu attributed to Alexander of Aphrodisias can be divided into four sections. The first is an interpretation of the Aristotelian theory of intellect, and especially of the active intellect referred to in Aristotle, De anima 3.5, which differs from the interpretation in Alexander's own De anima, and whose relation to Alexander's De anima, attribution to Alexander, and date are all disputed. The second is an account of the intellect which is broadly similar to (...)
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  36.  10
    R. W. Sharples (1982). Alexander of Aphrodisias on Divine Providence: Two Problems. Classical Quarterly 32 (01):198-.
    The position on the question of divine providence of the Aristotelian commentator Alexander of Aphrodisias is of particular interest. It marks an attempt to find a via media between the Epicurean denial of any divine concern for the world, on the one hand, and the Stoic view that divine providence governs it in every detail, on the other.2 As an expression of such a middle course it finds a place in later classifications of views concerning providence.3 It is also (...)
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  37.  4
    Alexander of Hales & Oleg Bychkov (2008). Alexander of Hales, The Sum of Theology. Franciscan Studies 66 (1):63-74.
  38.  1
    John Shannon Hendrix (2010). Philosophy of Intellect and Vision in the De Anima and De Intellectu of Alexander of Aphrodisias. Philosophy 1:1-2010.
    Alexander of Aphrodisias was born somewhere around 150, in Aphrodisia on the Aegean Sea. He began his career in Alexandria during the reign of Septimius Severus, was appointed to the peripatetic chair at the Lyceum in Athens in 198, a post established by Marcus Aurelius, wrote a commentary on the De anima of Aristotle, and died in 211. According to Porphyry, Alexander was an authority read in the seminars of Plotinus in Rome. He is the earliest philosopher who (...)
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  39. Robert W. Sharples (ed.) (2004). Alexander of Aphrodisias. Supplement to "on the Soul". Cornell University Press.
    The "Supplement" transmitted as the second book of "On the Soul" by Alexander of Aphrodisias is a collection of short texts on a wide range of topics from psychology, including the general hylomorphic account of soul and its faculties, and the theory of vision; questions in ethics ; and issues relating to responsibility, chance and fate. One of the texts in the collection, "On Intellect", had a major influence on medieval Arabic and Western thought, greater than that of (...)'s "On the Soul" itself. The treatises may all be by Alexander himself; certainly the majority of them are closely connected with his other works. Many of them, however, consist of collections of arguments on particular issues, collections which probably incorporate material from earlier in the history of the Peripatetic school. This translation is from a new edition of the Greek text based on a collation of all known manuscripts and comparison with medieval Arabic and Latin translations. (shrink)
     
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  40. Eckhard Keßler (2011). Alexander of Aphrodisias and His Doctrine of the Soultext of the Book is a Translation From the German, the German Original Being Published Alsready as Introduction to the Reprint of the Latin Translation of Alexander's "Enarratio de Anima": 1400 Years of Lasting Significance. Brill.
    Following Alexander of Aphrodisias through the Aristotelian tradition from the second to the sixteenth century, this book discovers an almost forgotten leading figure in the fervently disputed development of psychology and natural philosophy in early modern times.
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  41.  6
    Eckhard Kessler (2011). Alexander of Aphrodisias and His Doctrine of the Soul: 1400 Years of Lasting Significance. Brill.
    This piece of work intends to shed light on Alexander of Aphrodisias from the second-century Aristotle commentator through the history of Aristotelian psychology up to the sixteenth century's clandestine prompter of the new philosophy of nature. In the millennium after his death the head of the Peripatetic school in Athens served as the authority on Aristotle in the Neo-Platonic school, survived the Arabic centuries of philosophy as Averroes' exemplary exponent of the mortality of the soul and as such was (...)
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  42. R. Sharples (2000). The Unity of the Virtues in Aristotle, in Alexander of Aphrodisias, and in the Byzantine Commentators. Etica E Politica 2 (2).
    Aristotle’s argument in Nicomachean Ethics 6 for the mutual implication of the virtues by one another is developed, and others added to it, in a repertory of arguments for this thesis in section 18 of the De anima libri mantissa attributed to Alexander of Aphrodisias. The last part of this is echoed in no.22 of the Ethical Problems attributed to Alexander; nos. 8 and 28 of the same collection are also relevant. A distinction can be drawn between the (...)
     
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  43.  9
    A. A. Long (1975). Alexander of Aphrodisias, De Fato 190. 26 Ff. Classical Quarterly 25 (01):158-.
    Alexander is arguing that our responsibility for what we do () is grounded in the fact that a man is the of his own actions . The opponents of this view, he says, hold that nothing performed by a man is such that at the time when he does something he also has the possibility of not doing it, . One who believes this, he argues, cannot make any moral judgements or do any of the things ‘which ought reasonably (...)
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  44. David L. Hildebrand (2014). The Human Eros: Eco-Ontology and the Aesthetics of Existence by Thomas M. Alexander. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (2):308-313.
    The Human Eros is an outstanding accomplishment, a work of genuine wisdom. It combines meticulous scholarship with an enviable mastery of cultural and philosophical history to address pressing concerns of human beings, nature, and philosophy itself. While comprised of essays spanning over two decades, the book presents a powerfully coherent philosophical vision which Alexander names, alternately, “eco-ontology,” “humanistic naturalism,” and “ecological humanism.” Whatever the name, the approach is humane and intellectually compelling, offering insight and direction to pragmatism, aesthetics, existentialism, (...)
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  45.  98
    Courtney D. Fugate (2014). Alexander Baumgarten on the Principle of Sufficient Reason. Philosophica 44.
    This paper defends the Principle of Sufficient Reason, taking Baumgarten as its guide. The primary aim is not to vindicate the principle, but rather to explore the kinds of resources Baumgarten originally thought sufficient to justify the PSR against its early opponents. The paper also considers Baumgarten's possible responses to Kant's pre-Critical objections to the proof of the PSR. The paper finds that Baumgarten possesses reasonable responses to all these objections. While the paper notes that (...)
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  46.  2
    Milan Subotic (2008). The Birth of Russian Intelligentsia From the Spirit of Enlightenment: Alexander Radishchev. Filozofija I Društvo 19 (3):293-311.
    This text is the first part of a larger study about Alexander Radishchev, one of the leading representatives of Enlightenment in Russia's XVIII Century. Analyzing Voltaire's and Diderot's relationship with Catherine II, the Empress of Russia, in the Introduction of this article, the author formulates the reasons for thematization of Russian reception of Enlightenment. Since Radishchev is considered as 'the father of Russian intelligentsia', different approaches to the meaning of the concept of 'Russian intelligentsia' are considered in the first (...)
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  47.  35
    David Sloan Wilson (1999). A Critique of R.D. Alexander's Views on Group Selection. Biology and Philosophy 14 (3):431-449.
    Group selection is increasingly being viewed as an important force in human evolution. This paper examines the views of R.D. Alexander, one of the most influential thinkers about human behavior from an evolutionary perspective, on the subject of group selection. Alexander's general conception of evolution is based on the gene-centered approach of G.C. Williams, but he has also emphasized a potential role for group selection in the evolution of individual genomes and in human evolution. Alexander's views are (...)
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  48.  9
    Brian Harding (2008). The Use of Alexander the Great in Augustine's City of God. Augustinian Studies 39 (1):113-128.
    This paper discusses the various rhetorical and argumentative uses to which Augustine puts Alexander the Great in his City of God. I argue that Alexander is a particularly useful figure for Augustine insofar as he is both non-Roman and a figure greatly admired by the Romans. Because of this unique position, Augustine is able to use Alexander to examine and discredit certain ideals and character traits present to the Romans without alienating his audience. I examine, in detail, (...)
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  49. H. G. Callaway (ed.) (2011). Alexander James Dallas: An Exposition of the Causes and Character of the War. An Annotated Edition. Dunedin Academic Press.
    Alexander James Dallas' An Exposition of the Causes and Character of the War was written as part of an effort by the then US government to explain and justify its declaration of war in 1812. However publication coincided with the ratification of the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War. The Exposition is especially interesting for the insight it provides into the self-constraint of American foreign policy and of the conduct of a war. The focus is on the foreign (...)
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  50.  42
    Riin Sirkel (2011). Alexander of Aphrodisias's Account of Universals and its Problems. Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (3):297-314.
    The philosophical problem of universals is traditionally framed as the problem about the ontological status of universals. It is often said that the ontological status of universals is a post-Aristotelian problem that was bequeathed to the Middle Ages by a famous sentence in Porphyry's Isagoge. 1 Porphyry raises but then refuses to answer three questions about the ontological status of genera and species, saying that they are too "deep" for the present investigation. 2 Although Porphyry is the first to announce (...)
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