Search results for 'Alexandra Newton' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Alexandra Newton (Universität Leipzig)
  1. Isaac Newton (1953/2005). Newton's Philosophy of Nature: Selections From His Writings. Dover Publications.score: 150.0
    Aside from the Principia and occasional appearances of the Opticks , Newton' writings have remained largely inaccessible to students of philosophy, science, and literature as well as to other readers. This book provides a remedy with wide representation of the interests, problems, and diverse philosophic issues that preoccupied the greatest scientific mind of the seventeenth century. Grouped in sections corresponding to methods, principles, and theological considerations, these selections feature explanatory notes and cross-references to related essays.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Alexandra Newton (2012). Kant on the Logical Origin of Concepts. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):n/a-n/a.score: 120.0
    In his lectures on general logic Kant maintains that the generality of a representation (the form of a concept) arises from the logical acts of comparison, reflection and abstraction. These acts are commonly understood to be identical with the acts that generate reflected schemata. I argue that this is mistaken, and that the generality of concepts, as products of the understanding, should be distinguished from the classificatory generality of schemata, which are products of the imagination. A Kantian concept does not (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Einstein Y. La Noción De Newton (2001). I NTRODUCCIÓN M ucha gente tiende a pensar que con la teoría de la relatividad de Einstein, el concepto de tiempo absoluto de Isaac Newton quedó totalmente refutado. 1 En este trabajo nos proponemos explorar la idea de que, al. Signos Filosóficos 5:65-81.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Isaac Newton (1704/1952). Opticks. Dover Press.score: 60.0
    Reproduces the text of Newton's dissertation on the nature and properties of light.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Richard A. Burgess, Michael Davis, Marilyn A. Dyrud, Joseph R. Herkert, Rachelle D. Hollander, Lisa Newton, Michael S. Pritchard & P. Aarne Vesilind (2013). Engineering Ethics: Looking Back, Looking Forward. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1395-1404.score: 60.0
    The eight pieces constituting this Meeting Report are summaries of presentations made during a panel session at the 2011 Association for Practical and Professional Ethics (APPE) annual meeting held between March 3rd and 6th in Cincinnati. Lisa Newton organized the session and served as chair. The panel of eight consisted both of pioneers in the field and more recent arrivals. It covered a range of topics from how the field has developed to where it should be going, from identification (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Isaac Newton (2004). Philosophical Writings. Cambridge, Uk ;Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) left a voluminous legacy of writings. Despite his influence on the early modern period, his correspondence, manuscripts, and publications in natural philosophy remain scattered throughout many disparate editions. In this volume, Newton's principal philosophical writings are for the first time collected in a single place. They include excerpts from the Principia and the Opticks, his famous correspondence with Boyle and with Bentley, and his equally significant correspondence with Leibniz, which is often ignored in favor (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (2005). Consciousness and Emotion: Agency, Conscious Choice, and Selective Perception. John Benjamins.score: 30.0
    The papers in this volume of Consciousness & Emotion Book Series are organized around the theme of "enaction.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Natika Newton (1989). On Viewing Pain as a Secondary Quality. Noûs 23 (5):569-98.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Lisa Newton (2001). A Fair Defense of a False Start: A Reply to Kenneth Himma. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 33 (2):145 - 149.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Natika Newton (1986). Churchland on Direct Introspection of Brain States. Analysis 46 (March):97-102.score: 30.0
  11. Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (1998). Three Paradoxes of Phenomenal Consciousness: Bridging the Explanatory Gap. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (4):419-42.score: 30.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Natika Newton (1992). Dennett on Intrinsic Intentionality. Analysis 52 (1):18-23.score: 30.0
  13. Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (2000). The Interdependence of Consciousness and Emotion. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):1-10.score: 30.0
  14. Natika Newton (1988). Introspection and Perception. Topoi 7 (March):25-30.score: 30.0
    Sydney Shoemaker argues that introspection, unlike perception, provides no identification information about the self, and that knowledge of one''s mental states should be conceived as arising in a direct and unmediated fashion from one''s being in those states. I argue that while one does not identify aself as the subject of one''s states, one does frequently identify and misidentify thestates, in ways analogous to the identification of objects in perception, and that in discourse about one''s mental states the self plays (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Natika Newton (2001). Emergence and the Uniqueness of Consciousness. Journal Of Consciousness Studies 8 (9-10):47-59.score: 30.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Thomas H. Bivins & Julianne H. Newton (2003). The Real, the Virtual, and the Moral: Ethics at the Intersection of Consciousness. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (3 & 4):213 – 229.score: 30.0
    The promise of virtual reality is that it may eventually lead us to a "third state of consciousness" transcending the objective reality of our embodied beings and opening up to us a world of expanded realization. However, the recurring themes of our hero myths, both religious and secular, remind us of the importance of remaining grounded in the real world of embodied people and phenomenal perception. Advances in neuroscience even suggest that unconscious processing of perceptual stimuli may guide our behaviors. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Natika Newton (1996). Foundations of Understanding. John Benjamins.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Natika Newton (2003). A Critical Review of Nicholas Maxwell's the Human World in the Physical Universe: Consciousness, Free Will, and Evolution. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 16 (1):149 – 156.score: 30.0
    Nicholas Maxwell takes on the ambitious project of explaining, both epistemologically and metaphysically, the physical universe and human existence within it. His vision is appealing; he unites the physical and the personal by means of the concepts of aim and value, which he sees as the keys to explaining traditional physical puzzles. Given the current popularity of theories of goal-oriented dynamical systems in biology and cognitive science, this approach is timely. But a large vision requires firm and nuanced arguments to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Lisa H. Newton, Louis Hodges & Susan Keith (2004). Accountability in the Professions: Accountability in Journalism. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3 & 4):166 – 190.score: 30.0
    Accountability is viewed as a civilizing element in society, with professional accountability formalized in most cases as duties dating to the Greeks and Socrates; journalists must find their own way, without formal professional or government regulation or licensing. Three scholars look at the process in a line from the formal professional discipline to suggesting problems the journalism fraternity faces without regulation to suggesting serious internal ethics conferences as 1 solution to the problem.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Lisa H. Newton (1977). Abortion in the Law: An Essay on Absurdity. Ethics 87 (3):244-250.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Andrew Alexandra (2002). Academic Personality and the Commodification of Academic Texts. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (4):279-286.score: 30.0
    This paper explores the nature of, and justification for, copyright in academic texts in the light of recent developments in information technology, in particular the growth of electronic publication on the internet. Copyright, like other forms of property, is best thought of as a cluster of rights. A distinction is drawn within this cluster between first order `control rights' and higher order `commodity rights'. It is argued that copyright in academic texts is founded on its role as a means to (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Natika Newton (1989). Machine Understanding and the Chinese Room. Philosophical Psychology 2 (2):207-15.score: 30.0
    John Searle has argued that one can imagine embodying a machine running any computer program without understanding the symbols, and hence that purely computational processes do not yield understanding. The disagreement this argument has generated stems, I hold, from ambiguity in talk of 'understanding'. The concept is analysed as a relation between subjects and symbols having two components: a formal and an intentional. The central question, then becomes whether a machine could possess the intentional component with or without the formal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Louis W. Hodges, Lisa H. Newton, Jerry Dunklee, Eugene L. Roberts, Andrew Sikula & Chris Roberts (2004). Cases and Commentaries. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3 & 4):293 – 306.score: 30.0
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Eric Newton (1961). Art as Communication. British Journal of Aesthetics 1 (2):71-85.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Natika Newton (1989). Visualizing is Imagining Seeing: A Reply to White. Analysis 49 (March):77-81.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Andrew Alexandra & Seumas Miller (1999). Copyright in Teaching Materials. Educational Philosophy and Theory 31 (1):87–96.score: 30.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Natika Newton (1991). Consciousness, Qualia, and Re-Entrant Signaling. Behavior and Philosophy 19 (1):21-41.score: 30.0
    There is a distinction between phenomenal properties and the "phenomenality" of those properties: e.g. between what red is like and what it is like to experience red. To date, reductive accounts explain the former, but not the latter: Nagel is right that they leave something out. This paper attempts a reductive account of what it is like to have a perceptual experience. Four features of such experience are distinguished: the externality, unity, and self-awareness belonging to the content of conscious experience, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Michael Davis, Christopher Meyers, Lisa H. Newton & Elliot D. Cohen (2004). Report Cards. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3 & 4):161 – 165.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Natika Newton (1982). Experience and Imagery. Southern Journal of Philosophy 21 (4):475-87.score: 30.0
  30. K. M. Newton (1995). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 35 (1):404-405.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Willard Downs & Kelley Ann Newton (1989). Legal Implications in Development and Use of Expert Systems in Agriculture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 2 (1):53-58.score: 30.0
    Applications of Artificial Intelligence, particularly Expert Systems, are rapidly increasing. This science promises to give computer-based systems the capability of reasoning and decision making in near human-like fashion. Whether used for farm management or intelligent machine control, Expert Systems will find many agricultural applications. Much of the development and distribution of such systems will probably take place in the public sector, particularly the Cooperative Extension Service. A major nontechnical factor affecting the development and extensive use of Expert Systems is the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Natika Newton (1985). Acting and Perceiving in Body and Mind. Philosophy Research Archives 11:407-429.score: 30.0
    In this paper I sketch an account of (a) the origin of the terms and concepts of folk psychology, and (b) the true nature of mental states. I argue that folk psychology is built on metaphors for the functioning physical body, and that mental states are neurological traces which serve as schematic ‘mental images’ of those same functions. Special attention is paid to the folk psychology of self-consciousness. In particular, I argue that the notion of introspection is mistaken, and I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Stella Mary Newton (1976). A Confraternity of the Holy Ghost and a Series of Paintings of the Life of the Virgin in London and Munich. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 39:59-68.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. K. M. Newton (1985). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 25 (1):404-405.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (2005). The Unity of Consciousness: An Enactivist Approach. Journal of Mind and Behavior 26 (4):225-280.score: 30.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Shawn M. McKinney, Kimberly Sultze, Michael Longinow, Jack Zibluk & Julianne H. Newton (2002). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 17 (1):69 – 86.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. K. M. Newton (1983). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 23 (3):404-405.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. K. M. Newton (1990). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 30 (1):404-405.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. K. M. Newton (1992). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 32 (2):404-405.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. K. M. Newton (1993). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (2):404-405.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. K. M. Newton (1994). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (1):404-405.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Eric Newton (1962). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 2 (3):273-275.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Natika Newton (2000). Conscious Emotion in a Dynamic System: How I Can Know How I Feel. In Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.), The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization - an Anthology. John Benjamins.score: 30.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Natika Newton (2001). The Function of the Cerebellum in Cognition, Affect and Consciousness: Empirical Support for the Embodied Mind--Introduction. Consciousness and Emotion 2 (2):273-276.score: 30.0
  45. Quayshawn Spencer (2004). Do Newton's Rules of Reasoning Guarantee Truth ... Must They? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 35 (4):759-782.score: 18.0
    Newton’s Principia introduces four rules of reasoning for natural philosophy. Although useful, there is a concern about whether Newton’s rules guarantee truth. After redirecting the discussion from truth to validity, I show that these rules are valid insofar as they fulfill Goodman’s criteria for inductive rules and Newton’s own methodological program of experimental philosophy; provided that cross-checks are used prior to applications of rule 4 and immediately after applications of rule 2 the following activities are pursued: (1) (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Hylarie Kochiras (2009). Gravity and Newton's Substance Counting Problem. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 40 (3):267-280.score: 18.0
    A striking feature of Newton’s thought is the very broad reach of his empiricism, potentially extending even to immaterial substances, including God, minds, and should one exist, a non-perceiving immaterial medium. Yet Newton is also drawn to certain metaphysical principles—most notably the principle that matter cannot act where it is not—and this second, rationalist feature of his thought is most pronounced in his struggle to discover ‘gravity’s cause’. The causal problem remains vexing, for he neither invokes primary causation, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Edward Slowik (2013). Newton's Neo-Platonic Ontology of Space. Foundations of Science 18 (3):419-448.score: 18.0
    This paper investigates Newton’s ontology of space in order to determine its commitment, if any, to both Cambridge neo-Platonism, which posits an incorporeal basis for space, and substantivalism, which regards space as a form of substance or entity. A non-substantivalist interpretation of Newton’s theory has been famously championed by Howard Stein and Robert DiSalle, among others, while both Stein and the early work of J. E. McGuire have downplayed the influence of Cambridge neo-Platonism on various aspects of (...)’s own spatial hypotheses. Both of these assertions will be shown to be problematic on various grounds, with special emphasis placed on Stein’s influential case for a non-substantivalist reading. Our analysis will strive, nonetheless, to reveal the unique or forward-looking aspects of Newton’s approach, most notably, his critical assessment of substance ontologies, that help to distinguish his theory of space from his neo-Platonic contemporaries and predecessors. (shrink)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Ori Belkind (2013). Leibniz and Newton on Space. Foundations of Science 18 (3):467-497.score: 18.0
    This paper reexamines the historical debate between Leibniz and Newton on the nature of space. According to the traditional reading, Leibniz (in his correspondence with Clarke) produced metaphysical arguments (relying on the Principle of Sufficient Reason and the Principle of Identity of Indiscernibles) in favor of a relational account of space. Newton, according to the traditional account, refuted the metaphysical arguments with the help of an empirical argument based on the bucket experiment. The paper claims that Leibniz’s and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Steffen Ducheyne (2009). Understanding (in) Newton's Argument for Universal Gravitation. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 40 (2):227 - 258.score: 18.0
    In this essay, I attempt to assess Henk de Regt and Dennis Dieks recent pragmatic and contextual account of scientific understanding on the basis of an important historical case-study: understanding in Newton’s theory of universal gravitation and Huygens’ reception of universal gravitation. It will be shown that de Regt and Dieks’ Criterion for the Intelligibility of a Theory (CIT), which stipulates that the appropriate combination of scientists’ skills and intelligibility-enhancing theoretical virtues is a condition for scientific understanding, is too (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Nicholas Maxwell (2014). Three Criticisms of Newton’s Inductive Argument in the Principia. Advances in Historical Studies 3 (1):2-11.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I discuss how Newton’s inductive argument of the Principia can be defended against criticisms levelled against it by Duhem, Popper and myself. I argue that Duhem’s and Popper’s criticisms can be countered, but mine cannot. It requires that we reconsider, not just Newton’s inductive argument in the Principia, but also the nature of science more generally. The methods of science, whether conceived along inductivist or hypothetico-deductivist lines, make implicit metaphysical presuppositions which rigour requires we make (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000