Search results for 'Alexandrian_school' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Joseph C. McLelland (1976). God the Anonymous: A Study in Alexandrian Philosophical Theology. [Sole Distributors, Greeno, Hadden].
     
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  2.  1
    Benjamin John King (2009). Newman and the Alexandrian Fathers: Shaping Doctrine in Nineteenth-Century England. Oxford University Press.
    By exploring which Fathers interested Newman most and when, using both published and archive material, Benjamin J. King demonstrates the influence of the..
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  3. Tadrous Y. Malaty (1994). The School of Alexandria. Jersey City, N.J. (427 West Side Ave., Jersey City 072304) ;St. Mark's Coptic Orthodox Church.
     
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  4. Montgomery J. Shroyer (1936). Alexandrian Jewish Literalists. [Philadelphia.
     
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    Philippe Vallat (2004). Farabi Et l'École D'Alexandrie: Des Prémisses de la Connaissance à la Philosophie Politique. J. Vrin.
    Farabi et l'école d'Alexandrie, est la première étude consacrée à l'ensemble des thèmes de l'œuvre de celui qui fut l'un des plus grands philosophes arabes.
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  6.  47
    A. H. Armstrong (1957). An Introduction to Ancient Philosophy. Littlefield Adams.
    Covers the period from the beginning of Greek Philosophy to St. Augustine.
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    Maria Dzielska (1995). Hypatia of Alexandria. Harvard University Press.
    In this engrossing book, Maria Dzielska searches behind the legend to bring us the real story of Hypatia's life and death, and new insight into her colorful ...
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  8.  29
    Harold Tarrant (2007). Olympiodorus and Proclus on the Climax of the Alcibiades. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 1 (1):3-29.
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  9. Ashokananda (1931). The Influence of Indian Thought on the Thought of the West. Mayavati, Almora, U.P., Advaita Ashrama.
     
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  10.  8
    Charles Bigg (1886). The Christian Platonists of Alexandria. G. Olms.
    Subtitle: Eight Lectures Preached Before the University of Oxford in the Year 1886 on the Foundation of the Late Rev.
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  11. Jesse Scott Boughton (1932). The Idea of Progress in Philo Judaeus. New York.
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  12.  11
    of Alexandria) Olympiodorus (the Younger (1998). Commentary on Plato's Gorgias. BRILL.
    This is a modern, annotated translation of antiquity's only extant commentary on Plato's moral and political dialogue "Gorgias," in which the author defends ancient Greek philosophy and culture at a time when Christianity has almost ...
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  13. Richard Bartram Tollinton (1932). Alexandrine Teaching on the Universe. London, G. Allen & Unwin Ltd..
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    Harold Tarrant (2013). Plato's Republics. Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society (Plato 12 (2012)).
    Various ancient sources refer to the Platonic work that we know as Republic in the plural. Aristotle seems to have made it possible to refer to politeiai as ‘constitutions’, actual or written, and therefore some of our texts are best explained as references to Plato’s two written constitutions, Republic and Laws. One neglected reference that may perhaps be explained in this way occurs in the anonymous Antiatticista. A large number of references from the Alexandrian school of Platonism in late antiquity (...)
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  15. Anna Motta (2014). The Visible Cosmos of Dialogues. Some Historical and Philosophical Remarks about Plato in the Late Antique Schools. Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 12:11-18.
    English and Portuguese Between the 5 th and the 6 th centuries A. D., the Neoplatonic school of Alexandria, where the philosophical didactic follows a specific cursus studiorum , is opened also to the Christian students. D espite some divergences of religious (but also of economical and of political) natures, and after some violent events which occur in the Egyptian city, the Alexandrian school is linked to its contemporary Neoplatonic school in Athens. And indeed t he Prolegomena to Platonic Philosophy, (...)
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    Anna Marmodoro & Irini-Fotini Viltanioti (eds.) (2017). Divine Powers in Late Antiquity. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Is power the essence of divinity, or are divine powers distinct from divine essence? Are they divine hypostases or are they divine attributes? Are powers such as omnipotence, omniscience, etc. modes of divine activity? How do they manifest? In which way can we apprehend them? Is there a multiplicity of gods whose powers fill the cosmos or is there only one God from whom all power(s) derive(s) and whose power(s) permeate(s) everything? These are questions that become central to philosophical and (...)
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  17.  14
    K. O. Brink (1946). Callimachus and Aristotle: An Inquiry Into Callimachus' ПΡΟΣ ПΡΑΞΙΦΑΝΗΝ. Classical Quarterly 40 (1-2):11-.
    The transition from the Athenian Peripatos of Aristotle to the Alexandrian Museion of Callimachus has often attracted notice. So closely akin was the organization of scholarship in the two centres of learning, so definite was the personal connexion between the two, that it seemed possible to trace an uninterrupted line of succession from the older to the younger school. That Callimachus the scholar worked in the Aristotelian tradition appeared obvious: ‘he might be called a Peripatetic in the same sense as (...)
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    R. E. Witt (1931). The Hellenism of Clement of Alexandria. Classical Quarterly 25 (3-4):195-.
    In seeking to understand the development of philosophy in later antiquity it is important to take account of Clement of Alexandria, perhaps the first Christian writer to be greatly influenced by the systems of Greece. Accordingly in this article certain aspects of Clement's doctrine will be selected for examination where his obligations to the philosophers have apparently hitherto received insufficient attention. In a valuable paper Mr. R. P. Casey has dealt with many important points, but there is room for further (...)
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  19. Filip Ivanovic (2013). Znanje i tradicija kod Klimenta Aleksandrijskog. Filozofija I Društvo 24 (2):264-274.
    One of the most important exponents of the School of Alexandria, Clement of Alexandria (ca. 150. – ca. 215.) is the author of a famous trilogy, consisting of Protrepticus, Paedagogus, and Stromata, which correspond to the three ways of acting of the Logos, namely to convert the pagans to the true faith, to cure the soul from passions, and to uplift the soul to the methodic and intellectual life of spiritual perfection. Logos thus acts through exhortation, training, and teaching. Clement (...)
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