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  1. Alfred J. Freddoso, Fides Et Ratio: A 'Radical' Vision of Intellectual Inquiry.
    Commentators on Pope John Paul II's encyclical Fides et Ratio(1) have not failed to notice the incongruity that envelops the Pope's defense of the powers of reason against contemporary forms of skepticism. As Nicholas Wolterstorff has put it: "How surprising and ironic that roughly two centuries after Voltaire and his cohorts mocked the church as the bastion of irrationality, the church, in the person of the pope, should be the one to put in a good word for reason." (2) In (...)
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  2. Alfred J. Freddoso, On Being a Catholic University: Some Thoughts On Our Present Predicament.
    At a poignant juncture early in Brideshead Revisited, Sebastian, after briefly recounting for Charles his family's rather checkered performance with regard to its Catholicism, remarks, "I wish I liked Catholics more." When Charles replies, "They seem just like other people," Sebastian rebukes him: "My dear Charles, that's exactly what they're not ... It's not just that they're a clique-- as a matter of fact, they're at least four cliques all blackguarding each other half the time--but they've got an entirely different (...)
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  3. Alfred J. Freddoso, Review of God, Time, and Knowledge by William Hasker (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1989), Faith and Philosophy 8 (1993): 99-107. [REVIEW]
    This outstanding book, which incorporates but goes beyond Hasker's extensive previous work on the subject, is a genuinely pivotal contribution to the lively current debate over divine foreknowledge and human freedom. If you plan to plunge into this debate at any time in the foreseeable future, you will have to take account of God, Time, and Knowledge.
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  4. Alfred J. Freddoso, Review of John F. Kavanaugh, S.J., Who Count As Persons?: Human Identity and the Ethics of Killing. [REVIEW]
    These are bleak days for moral theory in mainstream professional philosophy. At the heart of the matter lies our inability, within contemporary liberal democracies, to come to a consensus on the deep issue of what we are as human beings and where our true good lies. Because of this, any moral theory built on a rich view of human nature and of the good for human beings is automatically viewed with suspicion. And, in fact, there are few such theories around. (...)
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  5. Alfred J. Freddoso, Two Roles for Catholic Philosophers.
    In his treatise on justice St. Thomas points out that the virtue of filial piety (pietas), by which we render honor to our parents, fails to satisfy the proper definition of justice because we cannot fully repay our debt to them. The same holds true of the virtue of respectfulness (observantia), by which we render honor to our teachers and guides, all the more if they themselves are virtuous. Ralph McInerny has been teacher and guide to me, and a virtuous (...)
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  6. Alfred J. Freddoso, William of Ockham (C. 1285 - 1347).
    Born in England and educated at Oxford, Ockham was the preeminent Franciscan thinker of the mid-fourteenth century. Because of his role in the bitter dispute between the Franciscans and Pope John XXII over evangelical poverty, he was excommunicated in 1328. After that he abandoned philosophy and theology proper, producing instead a series of political tracts on the ecclesiastical and secular power of the papacy.
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  7. Alfred J. Freddoso (2005). Fides et ratio. Studia Neoaristotelica 2 (2):226-238.
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  8. Alfred J. Freddoso (1999). 14 Ockham on Faith and Reason. In P. V. Spade (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ockham. Cambridge. 326.
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  9. Alfred J. Freddoso (1994). God's General Concurrence with Secondary Causes: Pitfalls and Prospects. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 67 (2):131-156.
    My topic is God's activity in the ordinary course of nature. The precise mode of this activity has been the subject of prolonged debates within every major theistic intellectual tradition, though it is within the Catholic tradition that the discussion has been carried on with the most philosophical sophistication. The problem, in its simplest form, is this: Given the fundamental theistic tenet that God is the provident Lord of nature, the First Efficient Cause who creates the universe, sustains it in (...)
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  10. Alfred J. Freddoso (1994). God's General Concurrence with Secondary Causes. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (2):131-156.
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  11. Alfred J. Freddoso (1993). God, Time, and Knowledge. Faith and Philosophy 10 (1):99-107.
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  12. Alfred J. Freddoso (1991). God's General Concurrence with Secondary Causes: Why Conservation is Not Enough. Philosophical Perspectives 5:553-585.
    After an exposition of some key concepts in scholastic ontology, this paper examines four arguments presented by Francisco Suarez for the thesis, commonly held by Christian Aristotelians, that God's causal contribution to effects occurring in the ordinary course of nature goes beyond His merely conserving created substances along with their active and passive causal powers. The postulation of a further causal contribution, known as God's general concurrence (or general concourse), can be viewed as an attempt to accommodate an element of (...)
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  13. Alfred J. Freddoso (1991). Ontological Reductionism and Faith Versus Reason. Faith and Philosophy 8 (3):317-339.
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  14. Alfred J. Freddoso (ed.) (1988). On Divine Foreknowledge. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    Luis de Molina was a leading figure in the remarkable sixteenth-century revival of Scholasticism on the Iberian peninsula.
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  15. Alfred J. Freddoso (1986). Human Nature, Potency and the Incarnation. Faith and Philosophy 3 (1):27-53.
    According to the Christian doctrine of the Incarnation, the Son of God is truly but only contingently a human being. But is it also the case that Christ’s individual human nature is only contingently united to a divine person? The affirmative answer to this question, explicitly espoused by Duns Scotus and William of Ockham, turns out to be philosophically untenable, while the negative answer, which is arguably implicit in St. Thomas Aquinas, explication of the Incarnation, has some surprising and significant (...)
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  16. Thomas P. Flint & Alfred J. Freddoso (1983). Maximal Power. In Alfred J. Freddoso (ed.), The Existence and Nature of God. University of Notre Dame Press. 81--114.
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  17. Thomas P. Flint & Alfred J. Freddoso (1983). The Existence and Nature of God. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.
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  18. Alfred J. Freddoso (1983). Accidental Necessity and Logical Determinism. Journal of Philosophy 80 (5):257-278.
    This paper attempts to construct a systematic and plausible account of the necessity of the past. The account proposed is meant to explicate the central ockhamistic thesis of the primacy of the pure present and to vindicate Ockham's own non-Aristotelian response to the challenge of logical determinism.
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  19. Alfred J. Freddoso (ed.) (1983). The Existence and Nature of God. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.
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  20. Alfred J. Freddoso (1982). Abstract of Comments: Ockham and the Word Made Flesh. Noûs 16 (1):76 - 77.
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  21. Alfred J. Freddoso (1979). O-Propositions and Ockham's Theory of Supposition. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 20 (4):741-750.
  22. Alfred J. Freddoso (1978). Abailard on Collective Realism. Journal of Philosophy 75 (10):527-538.
    In the Logica Ingredientibus Abailard attacks the theory according to which universals are collections of individuals. This paper argues that Abailard's principal objection to this 'collective realism', viz, that it conflates universals with integral wholes, is actually quite strong, though it is generally overlooked by recent commentators. For implicit in this objection is the claim that the collective realist cannot provide a satisfactory account of predication. The reason for this is that integral wholes are not uniquely decomposable. In support of (...)
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