Search results for 'Alienation (Social psychology) in literature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    Paul Cooke & Helen Vassallo (eds.) (2009). Alienation and Alterity: Otherness in Modern and Contemporary Francophone Contexts. Peter Lang.
    The essays in this collection, which derive from the conference 'Alienation and Alterity: Otherness in Modern and Contemporary Francophone Contexts', held at the University of Exeter in September 2007, explore various aspects of this ...
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  2.  14
    Robert E. Abrams (2004). Landscape and Ideology in American Renaissance Literature: Topographies of Skepticism. Cambridge University Press.
    Robert Abrams argues that new concepts of space and landscape emerged in mid-nineteenth-century American writing, marking a linguistic and interpretative limit to American expansion. Abrams supports the radical elements of antebellum writing, where writers from Hawthorne to Rebecca Harding Davis disputed the naturalizing discourses of mid-nineteenth century society. Whereas previous critics find in antebellum writing a desire to convert chaos into an affirmative, liberal agenda, Abrams contends that authors of the 1840s and 50s deconstructed more than they constructed.
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  3.  59
    Richard Schmitt (2003). Alienation and Freedom. Westview Press.
    Drawing from existentialism, feminism, the thought of Karl Marx and novelists like Dostoevsky, Richard Schmitt looks at modern capitalist societies to understand what it is that might be wrong for individuals. His concern focuses specifically on those who are alienated-- those persons who have difficulty finding meaning in their lives, who lack confidence in themselves and trust in others and, finally, who are constantly distracted by consumer society. He explores how and why alienation occurs. From friendship, love, and work, (...)
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    Jean-Philippe Deranty (2011). Travail et expérience de la domination dans le néolibéralisme contemporain. Actuel Marx 1 (1):73-89.
    Work and Experience of Domination in Contemporary Neoliberalism This paper seeks to study the contemporary forms of domination at and through work, by focusing on subjective experiences of work. Against the background of Marx’s analysis of the manyfold nexus between social and political domination in general and domination at work, I begin by drawing in broad strokes the general picture of current experiences of work emerging from the contemporary French sociology and psychology of work. Related to this rich literature (...)
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  5. Jamake Highwater (1997). The Mythology of Transgression: Homosexuality as Metaphor. Oxford University Press.
    Jamake Highwater is a master storyteller and one of our most visionary writers, hailed as "an eloquent bard, whose words are fire and glory" (Studs Terkel) and "a writer of exceptional vision and power" (Ana"is Nin). Author of more than thirty volumes of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry, Highwater--considered by many to be the intellectual heir of Joseph Campbell--has long been intrigued by how our mythological legacies have served as a foundation of modern civilization. Now, in The Mythology of Transgression, he (...)
     
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