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Alisa Bokulich [27]Alisa Nicole Bokulich [1]
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Profile: Alisa Bokulich (Boston University)
  1. Alisa Bokulich (forthcoming). Bohr's Correspondence Principle. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  2. Alisa Bokulich (2015). A. Douglas Stone. Einstein and the Quantum: The Quest of the Valiant Swabian. [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):177-79.
    While everyone knows of Einstein’s brilliant work on relativity theory and many know of his later opposition to quantum theory as immortalized in his remark “He [God] does not play dice,” few outside of limited academic circles know of Einstein’s many seminal contributions to the development of quantum theory. In this highly accessible and enjoyable popular science book, Douglas Stone seeks to revise our popular conception of Einstein and bring the story of his profound and revolutionary insights into quantum theory (...)
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  3. Alisa Bokulich (2015). Maxwell, Helmholtz, and the Unreasonable Effectiveness of the Method of Physical Analogy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 50:28-37.
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  4. Alisa Bokulich & William J. Devlin (2015). Introduction. In Alisa Bokulich & William J. Devlin (eds.), Kuhn’s Structure of Scientific Revolutions - 50 Years On. Springer International Publishing
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  5. William J. Devlin & Alisa Bokulich (eds.) (2015). Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions - 50 Years On. Boston Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science, Vol. 311. Springer.
    In 1962, the publication of Thomas Kuhn’s Structure ‘revolutionized’ the way one conducts philosophical and historical studies of science. Through the introduction of both memorable and controversial notions, such as paradigms, scientific revolutions, and incommensurability, Kuhn argued against the traditionally accepted notion of scientific change as a progression towards the truth about nature, and instead substituted the idea that science is a puzzle solving activity, operating under paradigms, which become discarded after it fails to respond accordingly to anomalous challenges and (...)
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  6. Alisa Bokulich (2014). Bohr and Wittgenstein on Language and Reality. Metascience 23 (1):79-82.
  7. Alisa Bokulich (2014). How the Tiger Bush Got Its Stripes: ‘How Possibly’ Vs. ‘How Actually’Model Explanations. The Monist 97 (3):321-338.
    Simulations using idealized numerical models can often generate behaviors or patterns that are visually very similar to the natural phenomenon being investigated and to be explained. The question arises, when should these model simulations be taken to provide an explanation for why the natural phenomena exhibit the patterns that they do? An important distinction for answering this question is that between ‘how-possibly’ explanations and ‘how-actually’ explanations. Despite the importance of this distinction there has been surprisingly little agreement over how exactly (...)
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  8. Alisa Bokulich (2014). Metaphysical Indeterminacy, Properties, and Quantum Theory. Res Philosophica 91 (3):449-475.
    It has frequently been suggested that quantum mechanics may provide a genuine case of ontic vagueness or metaphysical indeterminacy. However, discussions of quantum theory in the vagueness literature are often cursory and, as I shall argue, have in some respects been misguided. Hitherto much of the debate over ontic vagueness and quantum theory has centered on the “indeterminate identity” construal of ontic vagueness, and whether the quantum phenomenon of entanglement produces particles whose identity is indeterminate. I argue that this way (...)
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  9. Alisa Bokulich (2014). Pluto and the 'Planet Problem': Folk Concepts and Natural Kinds in Astronomy. Perspectives on Science 22 (4):464-490.
    The 2006 decision by the International Astronomical Union to strip Pluto of its status as a planet generated considerable uproar not only in scientific circles, but among the lay public as well. After all, how can a vote by 424 scientists in a conference room in Prague undermine what every well-educated second grader knows is a scientific fact? The Pluto controversy provides a new and fertile ground in which to revisit the traditional philosophical problems of natural kinds and scientific change. (...)
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  10. Alisa Bokulich (2013). Explanatory Models Versus Predictive Models: Reduced Complexity Modeling in Geomorphology. In Vassilios Karakostas & Dennis Dieks (eds.), Epsa11 Perspectives and Foundational Problems in Philosophy of Science. Springer 115--128.
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  11. Alisa Bokulich (2012). Distinguishing Explanatory From Nonexplanatory Fictions. Philosophy of Science 79 (5):725-737.
    There is a growing recognition that fictions have a number of legitimate functions in science, even when it comes to scientific explanation. However, the question then arises, what distinguishes an explanatory fiction from a nonexplanatory one? Here I examine two cases—one in which there is a consensus in the scientific community that the fiction is explanatory and another in which the fiction is not explanatory. I shall show how my account of “model explanations” is able to explain this asymmetry, and (...)
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  12. Alisa Bokulich (2011). How Scientific Models Can Explain. Synthese 180 (1):33 - 45.
    Scientific models invariably involve some degree of idealization, abstraction, or nationalization of their target system. Nonetheless, I argue that there are circumstances under which such false models can offer genuine scientific explanations. After reviewing three different proposals in the literature for how models can explain, I shall introduce a more general account of what I call model explanations, which specify the conditions under which models can be counted as explanatory. I shall illustrate this new framework by applying it to the (...)
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  13. Alisa Bokulich & Peter Bokulich (eds.) (2011). Scientific Structuralism. Springer Science+Business Media.
    This book will be of particular interest to those philosophers, scientists, and mathematicians who are interested in the foundations of science.
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  14. Alisa Bokulich & Peter Bokulich (eds.) (2011). Scientific Structuralism, Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science. Springer.
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  15. Alisa Bokulich & Gregg Jaeger (eds.) (2010). Philosophy of Quantum Information and Entanglement. Cambridge University Press.
    "Entanglement can be understood as an extraordinary degree of correlation between states of quantum systems - a correlation that cannot be given an explanation ...
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  16. Alisa Bokulich, Three Puzzles About Bohr's Correspondence Principle.
    Niels Bohr’s “correspondence principle” is typically believed to be the requirement that in the limit of large quantum numbers (n→∞) there is a statistical agreement between the quantum and classical frequencies. A closer reading of Bohr’s writings on the correspondence principle, however, reveals that this interpretation is mistaken. Specifically, Bohr makes the following three puzzling claims: First, he claims that the correspondence principle applies to small quantum numbers as well as large (while the statistical agreement of frequencies is only for (...)
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  17. Alisa Bokulich (2008). Can Classical Structures Explain Quantum Phenomena? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (2):217-235.
    In semiclassical mechanics one finds explanations of quantum phenomena that appeal to classical structures. These explanations are prima facie problematic insofar as the classical structures they appeal to do not exist. Here I defend the view that fictional structures can be genuinely explanatory by introducing a model-based account of scientific explanation. Applying this framework to the semiclassical phenomenon of wavefunction scarring, I argue that not only can the fictional classical trajectories explain certain aspects of this quantum phenomenon, but also that (...)
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  18. Alisa Bokulich (2008). Paul Dirac and the Einstein-Bohr Debate. Perspectives on Science 16 (1):103-114.
    : Although Dirac rarely participated in the interpretational debates over quantum theory, it is traditionally assumed that his views were aligned with Heisenberg and Bohr in the so-called Copenhagen-Göttingen camp. However, an unpublished—and apparently unknown—lecture of Dirac's reveals that this view is mistaken; in the famous debate between Einstein and Bohr, Dirac sided with Einstein. Surprisingly, Dirac believed that quantum mechanics was not complete, that the uncertainty principle would not survive in the future physics, and that a deterministic description of (...)
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  19. Alisa Bokulich (2008). Reexamining the Quantum-Classical Relation: Beyond Reductionism and Pluralism. Cambridge University Press.
    Classical mechanics and quantum mechanics are two of the most successful scientific theories ever discovered, and yet how they can describe the same world is far from clear: one theory is deterministic, the other indeterministic; one theory describes a world in which chaos is pervasive, the other a world in which chaos is absent. Focusing on the exciting field of 'quantum chaos', this book reveals that there is a subtle and complex relation between classical and quantum mechanics. It challenges the (...)
     
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  20. Alisa Bokulich (2006). Heisenberg Meets Kuhn: Closed Theories and Paradigms. Philosophy of Science 73 (1):90-107.
  21. Alisa Bokulich (2006). The Evolving Concepts of Nature, Time, and Causation. Metascience 15 (1):183-186.
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  22. Alisa Bokulich (2004). Open or Closed? Dirac, Heisenberg, and the Relation Between Classical and Quantum Mechanics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 35 (3):377-396.
    This paper describes a long-standing, though little-known, debate between Paul Dirac and Werner Heisenberg over the nature of scientific methodology, theory change, and intertheoretic relations. Following Heisenberg’s terminology, their disagreements can be summarized as a debate over whether the classical and quantum theories are “open” or “closed.” A close examination of this debate sheds new light on the philosophical views of two of the great founders of quantum theory.
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  23. Alisa Bokulich (2003). Horizontal Models: From Bakers to Cats. Philosophy of Science 70 (3):609-627.
    At the center of quantum chaos research is a particular family of models known as quantum maps. These maps illustrate an important “horizontal” dimension to model construction that has been overlooked in the literature on models. Three ways in which quantum maps are being used to clarify the relationship between classical and quantum mechanics are examined. This study suggests that horizontal models may provide a new and fruitful framework for exploring intertheoretic relations.
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  24. Alisa Bokulich (2003). Quantum Measurements and Supertasks. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 17 (2):127 – 136.
    This article addresses the question whether supertasks are possible within the context of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. The supertask under consideration consists of performing an infinite number of quantum mechanical measurements in a finite amount of time. Recent arguments in the physics literature claim to show that continuous measurements, understood as N discrete measurements in the limit where N goes to infinity, are impossible. I show that there are certain kinds of measurements in quantum mechanics for which these arguments break down. (...)
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  25. David Wiggins, George Sherman Union, Mara Beller, Don Howard, Evelyn Fox Keller, Scott Gilbert, Margaret Morrison, Michael Dickson & Alisa Bokulich (2002). Boston Colloquium for Philosophy of Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 33:207-211.
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  26. Alisa Bokulich (2001). Rethinking Thought Experiments. Perspectives on Science 9 (3):285-307.
    : An examination of two thought experiments in contemporary physics reveals that the same thought experiment can be reanalyzed from the perspective of different and incompatible theories. This fact undermines those accounts of thought experiments that claim their justificatory power comes from their ability to reveal the laws of nature. While thought experiments do play a genuine evaluative role in science, they do so by testing the nonempirical virtues of a theory, such as consistency and explanatory power. I conclude that, (...)
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