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Alison Adam [15]Alison E. Adam [1]
  1. Danijela Bogdanovic, Michael Dowd, Eileen Wattam & Alison Adam (2012). Contesting Methodologies: Evaluating Focus Group and Privacy Diary Methods in a Study of on-Line Privacy. Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 10 (4):208-221.
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  2. Christopher Bull & Alison Adam (2011). Virtue Ethics and Customer Relationship Management: Towards a More Holistic Approach for the Development of 'Best Practice'. Business Ethics 20 (2):121-130.
    This paper focuses much-needed attention on the ethical nature of customer relationship management (CRM) strategies in organisations. The research uses an in-depth case study to reflect on the design, implementation and use of ‘best practice’ associated with CRM. We argue that conventional CRM philosophy is based on a fairly narrow construct that fails to consider ethical issues appropriately. We highlight why ethical considerations are important when organisations use CRM and how a more holistic approach incorporating some of Alasdair MacIntyre's ideas (...)
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  3. Christopher Bull & Alison Adam (2010). Customer Relationship Management Information Systems (CRM-IS) and the Realisation of Moral Agency. Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 8 (2):164-177.
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  4. Alison Adam (2008). Ethics for Things. Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):149-154.
    This paper considers the ways that Information Ethics (IE) treats things. A number of critics have focused on IE’s move away from anthropocentrism to include non-humans on an equal basis in moral thinking. I enlist Actor Network Theory, Dennett’s views on ‹as if’ intentionality and Magnani’s characterization of ‹moral mediators’. Although they demonstrate different philosophical pedigrees, I argue that these three theories can be pressed into service in defence of IE’s treatment of things. Indeed the support they lend to the (...)
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  5. Alison Adam (2005). Delegating and distributing morality: Can we inscribe privacy protection in a machine? [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 7 (4):233-242.
    This paper addresses the question of delegation of morality to a machine, through a consideration of whether or not non-humans can be considered to be moral. The aspect of morality under consideration here is protection of privacy. The topic is introduced through two cases where there was a failure in sharing and retaining personal data protected by UK data protection law, with tragic consequences. In some sense this can be regarded as a failure in the process of delegating morality to (...)
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  6. Alison Adam (2003). Cyborgs in the Chinese Room: Boundaries Transgressed and Boundaries Blurred. In John M. Preston & Michael A. Bishop (eds.), Views Into the Chinese Room: New Essays on Searle and Artificial Intelligence. Oxford University Press. 319--337.
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  7. Alison Adam (2002). Cyberstalking and Internet Pornography: Gender and the Gaze. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 4 (2):133-142.
    This paper is based on the premise that the analysis of some cyberethics problems would benefit from a feminist treatment. It is argued that both cyberstalking and Internet child pornography are two such areas which have a `gendered' aspect which has rarely been explored in the literature. Against a wide ranging feminist literature of potential relevance, the paper explores a number of cases through a focused approach which weaves together feminist concepts of privacy and the gaze.
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  8. Alison Adam (2002). Gender/Body/Machine. Ratio 15 (4):354–375.
    This article considers the question of embodiment in relation to gender and whether there are models of artificial intelligence (AI) which can enrol a concept of gender in their design. A central concern for feminist epistemology is the role of the body in the making of knowledge. I consider how this may inform a critique of the AI project and the related area of artificial life (A-Life), the latter area being of most interest in this paper. I explore briefly the (...)
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  9. Alison Adam (2001). Book Reviews: Pornography and the Internet: “ The Biggest Dirty Bookshop in History?”. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 31 (3):36-40.
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  10. Alison Adam & Eileen Green (2001). Equal Opportunies Online. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 31 (4):3.
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  11. Alison Adam (2000). Deleting the Subject: A Feminist Reading of Epistemology in Artificial Intelligence. Minds and Machines 10 (2):231-253.
    This paper argues that AI follows classical versions of epistemology in assuming that the identity of the knowing subject is not important. In other words this serves to `delete the subject''. This disguises an implicit hierarchy of knowers involved in the representation of knowledge in AI which privileges the perspective of those who design and build the systems over alternative perspectives. The privileged position reflects Western, professional masculinity. Alternative perspectives, denied a voice, belong to less powerful groups including women. Feminist (...)
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  12. Alison Adam (2000). Gender and Computer Ethics. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 30 (4):17-24.
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  13. Alison Adam & Jacqueline Ofori-Amanfo (2000). Does Gender Matter in Computer Ethics? Ethics and Information Technology 2 (1):37-47.
  14. Alison Adam (1998). Artificial Knowing: Gender and the Thinking Machine. Routledge.
    Artificial Knowing challenges the masculine slant in the Artificial Intelligence (AI) view of the world. Alison Adam admirably fills the large gap in science and technology studies by showing us that gender bias is inscribed in AI-based computer systems. Her treatment of feminist epistemology, focusing on the ideas of the knowing subject, the nature of knowledge, rationality and language, are bound to make a significant and powerful contribution to AI studies. Drawing from theories by Donna Haraway and Sherry Turkle, and (...)
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  15. Alison Adam (1993). Gendered Knowledge — Epistemology and Artificial Intelligence. AI and Society 7 (4):311-322.
    The paper proposes that gender can be used to explore alternative epistemologies represented within AI systems. Current research on feminist epistemology is reviewed then criticisms of the main philosophical position dominant in AI are outlined. These criticisms say little about epistemology and nothing about gender. It is suggested that the way forward might be found within the sociology of scientific knowledge as its approach is in accord with the postmodernist view of feminist epistemology in seeing knowledge as a cultural product. (...)
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  16. Alison E. Adam (1990). What Can the History of AI Learn From the History of Science? AI and Society 4 (3):232-241.
    There have been few attempts, so far, to document the history of artificial intelligence. It is argued that the “historical sociology of scientific knowledge” can provide a broad historiographical approach for the history of AI, particularly as it has proved fruitful within the history of science in recent years. The article shows how the sociology of knowledge can inform and enrich four types of project within the history of AI; organizational history; AI viewed as technology; AI viewed as cognitive science (...)
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