16 found
Order:
  1.  5
    Alison Assiter (forthcoming). Kierkegaard and the Ground of Morality. Acta Kierkegaardiana.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2.  10
    Alison Assiter (2013). Kant and Kierkegaard on Freedom and Evil. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:275-296.
    Kant and Kierkegaard are two philosophers who are not usually bracketed together. Yet, for one commentator, Ronald Green, in his book Kierkegaard and Kant: The Hidden Debt , a deep similarity between them is seen in the centrality both accord to the notion of freedom. Kierkegaard, for example, in one of his Journal entries, expresses a ‘passion’ for human freedom. Freedom is for Kierkegaard also linked to a paradox that lies at the heart of thought. In Philosophical Fragment Kierkegaard writes (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3.  10
    Alison Assiter & Jeff Noonan (2007). Human Needs: A Realist Perspective. Journal of Critical Realism 6 (2):173-198.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4.  42
    Alison Assiter (1996). Enlightened Women: Modernist Feminism in a Postmodern Age. Routledge.
    This is a bold and controversial feminist, philosophical critique of postmodernism. While providing a brief and accessible introduction to postmodernist feminist thought, Enlightened Women is also a unique defence of realism and enlightenment philosophy. The first half of the book covers an analysis of some of the most influential postmodernist theorists, such as Luce Irigaray and Judith Butler. In the second half Alison Assiter advocates a return to modernism in feminism. She argues, against the current orthodoxy, that there can be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  5.  26
    Alison Assiter (2013). Love, Socrates, and Pedagogy. Educational Theory 63 (3):253-263.
    A recent report on the UK's higher education system by Lord John Browne exemplifies the dominant trend in education policy initiatives toward a focus on education primarily for employment and for the acquisition of skills. In this essay, Alison Assiter argues that such an entrepreneurial approach neglects essential aspects of the processes of teaching and learning. She draws on the work of Hannah Arendt, who saw the proper role of education as imparting the love of a subject, to critique the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  1
    Alison Assiter (2015). DEBATE: Response to McWherter. Journal of Critical Realism 14 (5):508-517.
    This contribution to a debate with Dustin McWherter evaluates his claim that Kant is a ‘non-ontologist’ or an ‘anti-ontologist’ and challenges one specific consequence which McWherter argues follows from this attribution to Kant. I argue that, while it is true that Kant restricts the domain of ‘objects’ or ‘appearances’ as he calls them to what is knowable, this does not make him an ‘anti-ontologist’.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  8
    Alison Assiter (2013). Speculative and Critical Realism. Journal of Critical Realism 12 (3):283-300.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  5
    Alison Assiter (2004). 5 The Objectivity of Value. In Andrew Collier, Margaret Scotford Archer & William Outhwaite (eds.), Defending Objectivity: Essays in Honour of Andrew Collier. Routledge 63.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  4
    Alison Assiter (2013). Kierkegaard's Upbuilding Discourses and the Ground of Morality. Acta Kierkegaardiana 6 (6):42-64.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  1
    Alison Assiter (2011). Response to Morgan on Assiter. Journal of Critical Realism 10 (3):392-409.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Alison Assiter (1990). Althusser and Feminism. Pluto Press.
  12. Alison Assiter (2005). Enlightened Women: Modernist Feminism in a Postmodern Age. Routledge.
    This is a bold and controversial feminist, philosophical critique of postmodernism. Whilst providing a brief and accessible introduction to postmodernist feminist thought, _Enlightened Women_ is also a unique defence of realism and enlightenment philosophy. The first half of the book covers an analysis of some of the most influential postmodernist theorists, such as _Luce Irigaray_ and _Judith Butler_. In the second half Alison Assiter advocates a return to modernism in feminism. She argues, against the current orthodoxy, that there can be (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Alison Assiter & Margherita Tonon (eds.) (2012). Kierkegaard and the Political. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Alison Assiter (2015). Kierkegaard, Eve and Metaphors of Birth. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    A highly original rereading of Kierkegaard through the concept of birthing, highlighting a speculative hypothesis about the nature of Being in Kierkegaard’s work.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Alison Assiter (2015). Kierkegaard, Eve and Metaphors of Birth. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    A highly original rereading of Kierkegaard through the concept of birthing, highlighting a speculative hypothesis about the nature of Being in Kierkegaard’s work.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Alison Assiter (2003). Revisiting Universalism. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book begins from the premise that a common nature is shared by all human beings, regardless of social or economic background. The author asserts that significant moral consequences flow from the assumption that all human beings share a common set of natural needs. Using this starting point, the book seeks to defend an objectivist epistemology.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography