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Alison M. Jaggar [54]Alison Mary Jaggar [1]
  1.  4
    Alison M. Jaggar (1985). Feminist Politics and Human Nature. Mind 94 (373):151-153.
  2.  54
    Alison M. Jaggar & Susan Bordo (eds.) (1989). Gender/Body/Knowledge: Feminist Reconstructions of Being and Knowing. Rutgers University Press.
    The essays in this interdisciplinary collection share the conviction that modern western paradigms of knowledge and reality are gender-biased.
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  3. Alison M. Jaggar (1989). Love and Knowledge: Emotion in Feminist Epistemology. Inquiry 32 (2):151 – 176.
  4. Linda Martín Alcoff, Bat-Ami Bar On, Laura Cannon, Ann Ferguson, Marilyn Frye, Alison M. Jaggar, Alison Kafer, Jean Keller, Sarah Clark Miller, Michele Moody-Adams, Lisa Tessman & Shelley Wilcox (2005). Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This collection breaks new ground in four key areas of feminist social thought: the sex/gender debates; challenges to liberalism/equality; feminist ethics; and feminist perspectives on global ethics and politics in the 21st century. Altogether, the essays provide an innovative look at feminist philosophy while making substantive contributions to current debates in gender theory, ethics, and political thought.
     
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  5.  53
    Alison M. Jaggar (2000). Ethics Naturalized: Feminism's Contribution to Moral Epistemology. Metaphilosophy 31 (5):452-468.
  6. Alison M. Jaggar (2005). What is Terrorism, Why is It Wrong, and Could It Ever Be Morally Permissible? Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (2):202–217.
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  7.  94
    Alison M. Jaggar (2006). Reasoning About Well-Being: Nussbaum's Methods of Justifying the Capabilities. Journal of Political Philosophy 14 (3):301–322.
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  8. Alison M. Jaggar (1992). Feminist Ethics. In Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte B. Becker (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Ethics. Garland Publishing Inc 1--361.
     
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  9. Alison M. Jaggar (2003). Responding to the Evil of Terrorism. Hypatia 18 (1):175 - 182.
    : In this paper, I distinguish terrorism from other crimes and from war, noting that terrorism may be perpetrated not only by private individuals and members of nonstate organizations, but also that it may be ordered by the state. Since terrorism is illegal almost everywhere, I argue that the proper response to it is usually through law enforcement rather than military measures. In some circumstances, however, I content that even law enforcement procedures may be used by the state to terrorize (...)
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  10. R. G. Frey, Brad Hooker, F. M. Kamm, Thomas E. Hill Jr, Geoffrey Sayre-McCord, David McNaughton, Jan Narveson, Michael Slote, Alison M. Jaggar & William R. Schroeder (2000). Normative Ethics. In Hugh LaFollette - (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory. Blackwell Publishers
     
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  11. Alison M. Jaggar (2005). "Saving Amina": Global Justice for Women and Intercultural Dialogue. Ethics and International Affairs 19 (3):55–75.
    Western moral and political theorists have devoted much attention to the victimization of women by non-western cultures. But, conceiving injustice to poor women in poor countries as a matter of their oppression by illiberal cultures yields an imcomplete understanding of their situation.
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  12.  45
    Alison M. Jaggar & Theresa W. Tobin (2013). Situating Moral Justification: Rethinking the Mission of Moral Epistemology. Metaphilosophy 44 (4):383-408.
    This is the first of two companion articles drawn from a larger project, provisionally entitled Undisciplining Moral Epistemology. The overall goal is to understand how moral claims may be rationally justified in a world characterized by cultural diversity and social inequality. To show why a new approach to moral justification is needed, it is argued that several currently influential philosophical accounts of moral justification lend themselves to rationalizing the moral claims of those with more social power. The present article explains (...)
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  13.  46
    Alison M. Jaggar (1998). Globalizing Feminist Ethics. Hypatia 13 (2):7 - 31.
    The feminist conception of discourse offered below differs from classical discourse ethics. Arguing that inequalities of power are even more conspicuous in global than in local contexts, I note that a global discourse community seems to be emerging among feminists, and I explore the role played by small communities in feminism's attempts to reconcile a commitment to open discussion, on the one hand, with a recognition of the realities of power inequalities, on the other.
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  14. Michael Tooley, Alison M. Jaggar, Philip E. Devine & Celia Wolf-Devine (2009). Abortion: Three Perspectives. OUP Usa.
    The newest addition to the Point/Counterpoint Series, Abortion: Three Perspectives features a debate between four noted philosophers - Michael Tooley, Celia Wolf-Devine, Philip E. Devine, and Alison M. Jaggar - presenting different perspectives on one of the most socially and politically argued issues of the past 30 years. The three main arguments include the "liberal" pro-choice approach, the "communitarian" pro-life approach, and the "gender justice" approach. Divided into two parts, the text features the authors' ideas, developed in depth, and their (...)
     
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  15.  64
    Alison M. Jaggar (2002). A Feminist Critique of the Alleged Southern Debt. Hypatia 17 (4):119-142.
    : Neoliberal globalization has deepened the impoverishment and marginalization of many women. This system is maintained by the debt supposedly owed by many poor nations in the global South to a few rich nations in the global North, because the obligation to service the debt traps the people of the South within an economic order that severely disadvantages them. I offer several reasons for thinking that many of these alleged debt obligations are not morally binding, especially on Southern women.
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  16.  41
    Alison M. Jaggar (2009). Transnational Cycles of Gendered Vulnerability. Philosophical Topics 37 (2):33-52.
    Across the world, the lives of men and women who are otherwise similarly situated tend to differ from each other systematically. Although gender disparities varywidely within and among regions, women everywhere are disproportionately vulnerable to poverty, abuse and political marginalization. This article proposes thatglobal gender disparities are caused by a network of norms, practices, policies, and institutions that include transnational as well as national elements. These interlaced and interacting factors frequently modify and sometimes even reduce gendered vulnerabilities but their overall (...)
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  17. Alison M. Jaggar & Iris Marion Young (eds.) (1998). A Companion to Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell.
  18.  74
    Alison M. Jaggar (2002). Vulnerable Women and Neo-Liberal Globalization: Debt Burdens Undermine Women's Health in the Global South. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (6):425-440.
    Contemporary processes of globalization havebeen accompanied by a serious deterioration inthe health of many women across the world. Particularly disturbing is the drastic declinein the health status of many women in theglobal South, as well as some women in theglobal North. This paper argues that thehealth vulnerability of women in the globalSouth is inseparable from their political andeconomic vulnerability. More specifically, itlinks the deteriorating health of many Southernwomen with the neo-liberal economic policiesthat characterize contemporary economicglobalization and argues that this structure (...)
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  19.  86
    Alison M. Jaggar (1999). Multicultural Democracy. Journal of Political Philosophy 7 (3):308-329.
  20.  40
    Alison M. Jaggar (ed.) (2010). Thomas Pogge and His Critics. Polity.
    With a clear and informative introduction by Alison Jaggar, and original contributions from Neera Chandhoke, Jiwei Ci, Joshua Cohen, Erin Kelly, Lionel ...
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  21. Heidi Grasswick, Cressida J. Heyes, Cheryl L. Hughes, Alison M. Jaggar, Marìa Pìa Lara, Bonnie Mann, Norah Martin, Diana Tietjens Meyers, Kate Parsons, Misha Strauss, Margaret Urban Walker, Abby Wilkerson & IrisMarion Young (2002). Recognition, Responsibility, and Rights: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This collection of papers by prominent feminist thinkers advances the positive feminist project of remapping the moral by developing theory that acknowledges the diversity of women.
     
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  22.  59
    Alison M. Jaggar (1989). Feminist Ethics: Some Issues for the Nineties. Journal of Social Philosophy 20 (1-2):91-107.
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  23.  7
    Alison M. Jaggar (2009). L'Imagination au Pouvoir: Comparing John Rawls's Method of Ideal Theory with Iris Marion Young's Method of Critical Theory. In Lisa Tessman (ed.), Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non-Ideal. Springer 59--66.
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  24.  11
    Alison M. Jaggar (2015). Ideal and Nonideal Reasoning in Educational Theory. Educational Theory 65 (2):111-126.
    The terms “ideal theory” and “nonideal theory” are used in contemporary Anglophone political philosophy to identify alternative methodological approaches for justifying normative claims. Each term is used in multiple ways. In this article Alison M. Jaggar disentangles several versions of ideal and nonideal theory with a view to determining which elements may be helpful in designing models of real-world justice that are contextually relevant, morally plausible, and practically feasible.
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  25.  21
    Alison M. Jaggar (1997). Regendering the U.S. Abortion Debate. Journal of Social Philosophy 28 (1):127-140.
    This paper originated in a conference presentation with my colleague Michael Tooley, at which we were both asked to re-evaluate articles about abortion that each of us had written over twenty years earlier. While Tooley and I both contended that abortion should be legally unrestricted, there were striking differences in the style and content of our respective arguments. Contemplating these differences has reinforced my own belief in the importance of emphasizing the centrality of gender when discussing abortion. Since gender as (...)
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  26.  5
    Alison M. Jaggar (2009). Global Gender Justice. Philosophical Topics 37 (2).
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  27.  34
    Theresa W. Tobin & Alison M. Jaggar (2013). Naturalizing Moral Justification: Rethinking the Method of Moral Epistemology. Metaphilosophy 44 (4):409-439.
    The companion piece to this article, “Situating Moral Justification,” challenges the idea that moral epistemology's mission is to establish a single, all-purpose reasoning strategy for moral justification because no reasoning practice can be expected to deliver authoritative moral conclusions in all social contexts. The present article argues that rethinking the mission of moral epistemology requires rethinking its method as well. Philosophers cannot learn which reasoning practices are suitable to use in particular contexts exclusively by exploring logical relations among concepts. (...)
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  28.  4
    Alison M. Jaggar (2015). On Susan Moller Okin’s “Reason and Feeling in Thinking About Justice”. Ethics 125 (4):1127-1131.
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  29. Alison M. Jaggar (1989). Love and Knowledge: Emotion as an Epistemic Resource for Feminists. In Alison M. Jaggar & Susan Bordo (eds.), Gender/Body/Knowledge: Feminist Reconstructions of Being and Knowing. Rutgers University Press
     
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  30.  27
    Alison M. Jaggar (2002). Challenging Women's Global Inequalities. Philosophical Topics 30 (2):229-252.
  31.  85
    Alison M. Jaggar (ed.) (1994). Living with Contradictions: Controversies in Feminist Social Ethics. Westview Press.
    Some people believe that feminist ethics is little more than a series of dogmatic positions on issues such as abortion rights, pornography, and affirmative action.This caricature was never true, but Alison Jaggar’s Living with Contradictions is the first book to demonstrate just how rich and complex feminist ethics has become. Beginning with the modest assumption that feminism demands an examination of moral issues with a commitment to ending women’s subordination, this anthology shows that one can no longer divide social issues (...)
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  32. Alison M. Jaggar & Paula S. Rothenberg (1993). Feminist Frameworks Alternative Theoretical Accounts of the Relations Between Women and Men.
  33.  15
    Alison M. Jaggar (2013). Does Poverty Wear a Woman's Face? Some Moral Dimensions of a Transnational Feminist Research Project. Hypatia 28 (2):240-256.
    This article explains some moral dimensions of a transnational feminist research project designed to provide a better standard or metric for measuring poverty across the world. The author is an investigator on this project. Poverty metrics incorporate moral judgments about what is necessary for a decent life, so justifying metrics requires moral argumentation. The article clarifies the moral aspects of poverty valuation, indicates some moral flaws in existing global poverty metrics, and outlines some conditions for a better global metric. It (...)
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  34.  20
    Alison M. Jaggar (2007). Teaching in Colorado: Not a Rocky Mountain High; Academic Freedom in a Climate of Repression. Teaching Philosophy 30 (2):149-172.
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  35.  24
    Alison M. Jaggar (1997). Gender, Race, and Difference: Individual Consideration Versus Group-Based Affirmative Action in Admission to Higher Education. Southern Journal of Philosophy 35 (S1):21-51.
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  36.  19
    Alison M. Jaggar (2009). Introduction. Philosophical Topics 37 (2):1-15.
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  37.  15
    Alison M. Jaggar (1996). Gender, Race, and Difference. Southern Journal of Philosophy 35 (Supplement):21-51.
  38.  6
    Alison M. Jaggar (2007). Symposia on Gender, Race and Philosophy. Philosophy 3 (1).
  39.  13
    Sandra Lee Bartky, Marilyn Friedman, William Harper, Alison M. Jaggar, Richard H. Miller, Abigail L. Rosenthal, Naomi Scheman, Nancy Tuana, Steven Yates, Christina Sommers, Philip E. Devine, Harry Deutsch, Michael Kelly & Charles L. Reid (1992). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 65 (7):55 - 90.
  40.  6
    Alison M. Jaggar (2007). Teaching in Colorado. Teaching Philosophy 30 (2):149-172.
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  41.  11
    Alison M. Jaggar & David H. Jaggar (1983). Animal Rights and Human Morality. Teaching Philosophy 6 (3):297-301.
  42.  11
    Alison M. Jaggar (1977). Male Instructors, Feminism, and Women's Studies. Teaching Philosophy 2 (3/4):247-256.
  43. Alison M. Jaggar (1987). Sex Inequality and Bias in Sex Differences Research. Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 13:25.
     
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  44.  5
    Alison M. Jaggar (2013). We Fight for Roses Too: Time-Use and Global Gender Justice. Journal of Global Ethics 9 (2):115 - 129.
    The World Development Report 2012: Gender Equality and Development has recently confirmed the widely held belief that women across the world tend to perform different work from men who otherwise are situated similarly. Women also work longer hours than similarly situated men. In analyzing the justice of these gendered disparities in time-use, WDR 2012 uses a moral framework that is largely distributive. Although this framework illuminates some aspects of the injustice of the situation, I contend that it obscures other crucial (...)
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  45.  8
    Alison M. Jaggar (1991). Making People Just or Appropriating Their Voices? A Critical Discussion of James P. Sterba's How to Make People Just. Journal of Social Philosophy 22 (3):52-63.
  46.  2
    Alison M. Jaggar (2005). Citizenship has Always Been a Cluster of Privileged Relations Holding on the One Hand Between States and (Some of) the Individuals Who Reside in the Territory They Govern and on the Other Hand Among Individuals Who Are Members of the Same Political Community. Because the State is Integral to Both These Aspects of Citizenship. In Marilyn Friedman (ed.), Women and Citizenship. OUP Usa 91.
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  47. Alison M. Jaggar (2002). A Feminist Critique of the Alleged Southern Debt. Hypatia 17 (4):119-142.
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  48. Alison M. Jaggar & Iris Young (eds.) (2000). Companion to Feminist Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  49. Alison M. Jaggar (2004). Feminist Politics and Epistemology: The Standpoint of Women. In Sandra G. Harding (ed.), The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader: Intellectual and Political Controversies. Routledge 55--66.
  50. Alison M. Jaggar (2010). Introduction. In Thomas Pogge and His Critics. Polity
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