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  1. Alison Shaw (2014). Rituals of Infant Death: Defining Life and Islamic Personhood. Bioethics 28 (2):84-95.
    This article is about the recognition of personhood when death occurs in early life. Drawing from anthropological perspectives on personhood at the beginnings and ends of life, it examines the implications of competing religious and customary definitions of personhood for a small sample of young British Pakistani Muslim women who experienced miscarriage and stillbirth. It suggests that these women's concerns about the lack of recognition given to the personhood of their fetus or baby constitute a challenge to customary practices surrounding (...)
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  2. Alison Shaw & John Robinson (2013). Relevant But Not Prescriptive. Philosophy Today 48 (Supplement):84-95.
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  3. Alison Shaw (2012). 'They Say Islam has a Solution for Everything, so Why Are There No Guidelines for This?' Ethical Dilemmas Associated with the Births and Deaths of Infants with Fatal Abnormalities From a Small Sample of Pakistani Muslim Couples in Britain. Bioethics 26 (9):485-492.
    This paper presents ethical dilemmas concerning the termination of pregnancy, the management of childbirth, and the withdrawal of life-support from infants in special care, for a small sample of British Pakistani Muslim parents of babies diagnosed with fatal abnormalities. Case studies illustrating these dilemmas are taken from a qualitative study of 66 families of Pakistani origin referred to a genetics clinic in Southern England. The paper shows how parents negotiated between the authoritative knowledge of their doctors, religious experts, and senior (...)
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  4. Joanna Latimer, Katie Featherstone, Paul Atkinson, Angus Clarke, Daniela T. Pilz & Alison Shaw, Rebirthing the Clinic : The Interaction of Clinical Judgement and Genetic Technology in the Production of Medical Science.
    The article reconsiders the nature and location of science in the development of genetic classification. Drawing on field studies of medical genetics, we explore how patient categorization is accomplished in between the clinic and laboratory. We focus on dysmorphology, a specialism concerned with complex syndromes that impair physical development. We show that dys-morphology is about more than fitting patients into prefixed diagnostic categories and that diagnostic process is marked by moments of uncertainty, ambiguity, and deferral. We describe how different forms (...)
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  5. Alison Shaw (2006). An Anthropological Perspective. In John R. Spencer & Antje Du Bois-Pedain (eds.), Freedom and Responsibility in Reproductive Choice. Hart Pub..
     
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  6. Alison Shaw & John Robinson (2004). Relevant but Not Prescriptive? Science Policy Models Within the Ipcc. Philosophy Today 48 (5):84-95.
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