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Profile: Alison Stone (Lancaster University)
  1. Alison Stone (forthcoming). Hegel on Women, Law, and Contract. In Maria Drakopoulou (ed.), Feminist Encounters with Legal Philosophy.
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  2. Alison Stone (forthcoming). Hegel's Philosophy of Right: Essays on Ethics, Politics and Law.
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  3. Alison Stone (2015). The Politics of Clarity. Hypatia 30 (1).
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  4. Jeffery Kinlaw, Nathan Ross, John Russon, Brian O'Connor, Kevin Thompson, Brian O'connor & Alison Stone (2014). G. W. F. Hegel. Acumen Publishing.
    The thought of G.W.F. Hegel has had a deep and lasting influence on a wide range philosophical, political, religious, aesthetic, cultural, and scientific movements. But, despite the far-reaching importance of Hegel's thought, there is often a great deal of confusion about what he actually said or believed.G. W. F. Hegel: Key Concepts provides an accessible introduction to both Hegel's thought and Hegel-inspired philosophy in general, demonstrating how his concepts were understood, adopted, and critically transformed by later thinkers. The first section (...)
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  5. Alison Stone (2014). Adorno, Hegel, and Dialectic. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (6):1118-1141.
    This article explores critical theory's relations to German idealism by clarifying how Adorno's thought relates to Hegel's. Adorno's apparently mixed responses to Hegel centre on the dialectic and actually form a coherent whole. In his Logic, Hegel outlines the dialectical process by which categories – fundamental forms of thought and reality – necessarily follow one another in three stages: abstraction, dialectic proper, and the speculative . Adorno's allegiance to Hegel's dialectic emerges when he traces the dialectical process whereby enlightenment reverts (...)
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  6. Alison Stone (2014). Alienation From Nature and Early German Romanticism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (1):41-54.
    In this article I ask how fruitful the concept of alienation can be for thinking critically about the nature and causes of the contemporary environmental crisis. The concept of alienation enables us to claim that modern human beings have become alienated or estranged from nature and need to become reconciled with it. Yet reconciliation has often been understood—notably by Hegel and Marx—as the state of being ‘at-home-with-oneself-in-the-world’, in the name of which we are entitled, perhaps even obliged, to overcome anything (...)
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  7. Alison Stone, Hegel on Law, Women, and Contract.
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  8. Alison Stone (2012). Against Matricide: Rethinking Subjectivity and the Maternal Body. Hypatia 27 (1):118-138.
    In this article I critically re-examine Julia Kristeva's view that becoming a speaking subject requires psychical matricide: violent separation from the maternal body. I propose an alternative, non-matricidal conception of subjectivity, in part by drawing out anti-matricidal strands in Kristeva's own thought, including her view that early mother–child relations are triangular. Whereas she understands this triangle in terms of a first imaginary father, I re-interpret this triangle using Donald Winnicott's idea of potential space and Jessica Benjamin's idea of an intersubjective (...)
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  9. Alison Stone, Gender, the Family, and the Organic State in Hegel's Political Thought.
  10. Alison Stone, Holderlin and Human-Nature Relations.
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  11. Alison Stone, Psychoanalytic Feminism and the Dynamics of Mothering a Daughter.
  12. Alison Stone, Feminism, Psychoanalysis and Maternal Subjectivity.
    In this book Alison Stone develops a feminist approach to maternal subjectivity. Stone argues that in the West the self has often been understood in opposition to the maternal body, so that one must separate oneself from the mother and maternal care-givers on whom one depended in childhood to become a self or, in modernity, an autonomous subject. These assumptions make it difficult to be a mother and a subject, an autonomous creator of meaning. Insofar as mothers nonetheless strive to (...)
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  13. Alison Stone, Mothering a Daughter.
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  14. Alison Stone (2011). Mother-Daughter Relations and the Maternal in Irigaray and Chodorow. Philosophia 1 (1):45-64.
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  15. Alison Stone, Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century.
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  16. Alison Stone, The Edinburgh Critical History of Nineteenth-Century Philosophy.
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  17. Alison Stone (ed.) (2011). The Edinburgh Critical History of Philosophy, Volume 5: The Nineteenth Century. Edinburgh University Press.
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  18. Alison Stone (2011). The Romantic Absolute. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (3):497-517.
    In this article I argue that the Early German Romantics understand the absolute, or being, to be an infinite whole encompassing all the things of the world and all their causal relations. The Romantics argue that we strive endlessly to know this whole but only acquire an expanding, increasingly systematic body of knowledge about finite things, a system of knowledge which can never be completed. We strive to know the whole, the Romantics claim, because we have an original feeling of (...)
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  19. Alison Stone (2010). Songsuk Susan Hahn, Contradiction in Motion: Hegel's Organic Concept of Life and Value. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 18 (2):320-324.
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  20. Alison Stone (2010). Matter and Form: Hegel, Organicism, and the Difference Between Women and Men. In Kimberly Hutchings & Tuija Pulkkinen (eds.), Hegel's Philosophy and Feminist Thought: Beyond Antigone? Palgrave Macmillan.
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  21. Alison Stone (2010). Natality and Mortality: Rethinking Death with Cavarero. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (3):353-372.
    In this article I rethink death and mortality on the basis of birth and natality, drawing on the work of the Italian feminist philosopher Adriana Cavarero. She understands birth to be the corporeal event whereby a unique person emerges from the mother’s body into the common world. On this basis Cavarero reconceives death as consisting in bodily dissolution and re-integration into cosmic life. This impersonal conception of death coheres badly with her view that birth is never exclusively material but always (...)
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  22. Alison Stone, N. Bauer, Kimberly Hutchings & Tuija Pulkkinen, Hegel and Feminist Politics : A Symposium.
  23. Alison Stone, French Feminism : The Maternal Against Disciplinary Power.
  24. Alison Stone, German Romantic and Idealist Conceptions of Nature.
  25. Alison Stone, Intelligibility, Materiality, Politics:Recent Work on Judith Butler.
  26. Alison Stone (2009). Lisa Baraitser, Maternal Encounters: The Ethics of Interruption. Radical Philosophy 156:51.
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  27. Alison Stone (2009). Maternal Encounters: The Ethics of Interruption. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 156.
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  28. Alison Stone (2009). Review of Luce Irigaray, Conversations. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (7).
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  29. Alison Stone, Adorno and Logic.
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  30. Alison Stone (2008). Being, Knowledge, and Nature in Novalis. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (1):141-163.
    : This paper reconstructs the evolution of Novalis’ thought concerning being, nature, and knowledge. In his earlier writings (above all the Fichte-Studies) he argues that unitary being underlies finite phenomena and that we can never know, but only strive towards knowledge of, being. In contrast, his later writings, principally the Allgemeine Brouillon, maintain that the unitary reality underlying finite things can be known, because it is an organic whole which develops and organises itself according to an intelligible pattern. Novalis equates (...)
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  31. Alison Stone, Nineteenth Century Philosophy.
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  32. Alison Stone, On Alienation From Life.
    In this article I respond to Wendell Kisner’s Hegelian environmental ethic. Kisner argues that because life is ontologically irreducible to mechanism it is rational to treat life not merely as a means to human purposes but as an end in itself. I argue that had Hegel consistently adhered to this position, he would have had to argue that the modern social world objectively alienates human beings from their rational selves. But Hegel in fact sees this social world as a home (...)
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  33. Alison Stone (2008). On Alienation From Life: A Response to Wendell Kisner’s “A Species-Based Environmental Ethic in Hegel’s Logic of Life”. The Owl of Minerva 40 (1):69-75.
    In this article I respond to Wendell Kisner’s Hegelian environmental ethic. Kisner argues that because life is ontologically irreducible to mechanism it is rational to treat life not merely as a means to human purposes but as an end in itself. I argue that had Hegel consistently adhered to this position, he would have had to argue that the modern social world objectively alienates human beings from their rational selves. But Hegel in fact sees this social world as a home (...)
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  34. Alison Stone (2008). On Matricide: Myth, Psychoanalysis and the Law of the Mother. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 150.
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  35. Alison Stone, Unthought Nature : Reply to Penelope Deutscher and Mary Beth Mader.
    In response to Mader's and Deutscher's questions, the author defends her approach to reading Irigaray and Butler, which entails extending the ideas of these thinkers into areas of thought with which they do not engage directly themselves. This involves relating Irigaray's ideas to the tradition of the philosophy of nature and interpreting Butler as offering, in spite of her focus on the genealogy of claims about sex, also a theory of sex itself, a theory of sex as an effect entirely (...)
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  36. Alison Stone (2007). An Introduction to Feminist Philosophy. Polity.
    This is the first book to offer a systematic account of feminist philosophy as a distinctive field of philosophy. The book introduces key issues and debates in feminist philosophy including: the nature of sex, gender, and the body; the relation between gender, sexuality, and sexual difference; whether there is anything that all women have in common; and the nature of birth and its centrality to human existence. An Introduction to Feminist Philosophy shows how feminist thinking on these and related topics (...)
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  37. Alison Stone, The Incomplete Materialism of French Materialist Feminism.
    French materialist feminists such as Christine Delphy and Monique Wittig maintain that the social fact of women’s exploitation by men within the family pre-exists and produces gender differences as well as the perception that men and women belong to different biological sexes. They take this position to be ‘materialist’ because it puts social facts prior to ideas and beliefs and so puts the ‘material’ prior to the ‘ideal’. However, I shall claim, drawing on arguments of Sebastiano Timpanaro’s, that this is (...)
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  38. Alison Stone (2006). Adorno and the Disenchantment of Nature. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (2):231-253.
    In this article I re-examine Adorno's and Horkheimer's account of the disenchantment of nature in Dialectic of Enlightenment . I argue that they identify disenchantment as a historical process whereby we have come to find natural things meaningless and completely intelligible. However, Adorno and Horkheimer believe that modernity not only rests on disenchantment but also tends to re-enchant nature, because it encourages us to think that its institutions derive from, and are anticipated and prefigured by, nature. I argue that Adorno's (...)
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  39. Alison Stone (2006). Luce Irigaray and the Philosophy of Sexual Difference. Cambridge University Press.
    Alison Stone offers a feminist defence of the idea that sexual difference is natural, providing a new interpretation of the later philosophy of Luce Irigaray. She defends Irigaray's unique form of essentialism and her rethinking of the relationship between nature and culture, showing how Irigaray's ideas can be reconciled with Judith Butler's performative conception of gender, through rethinking sexual difference in relation to German Romantic philosophies of nature. This is the first sustained attempt to connect feminist conceptions of embodiment to (...)
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  40. Alison Stone, Sexing the State : Familial and Political Form in Irigaray and Hegel.
  41. Alison Stone (2005). Friedrich Schlegel, Romanticism, and the Re-Enchantment of Nature. Inquiry 48 (1):3 – 25.
    In this paper I reconstruct Schlegel's idea that romantic poetry can re-enchant nature in a way that is uniquely compatible with modernity's epistemic and political values of criticism, self-criticism, and freedom. I trace several stages in Schlegel's early thinking concerning nature. First, he criticises modern culture for its analytic, reflective form of rationality which encourages a disenchanting view of nature. Second, he re-evaluates this modern form of rationality as making possible an ironic, romantic, poetry, which portrays natural phenomena as mysterious (...)
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  42. Alison Stone, Introduction: Nature, Environmental Ethics, and Continental Philosophy.
    Until recently, there has been relatively little self-conscious reflection - from either environmental or continental philosophers - on the specific contributions which continental philosophy, insofar as it is a distinctive tradition, might make to environmental thought. This situation has begun to change with several recent publications, such as Charles S. Brown and Ted Toadvine's edited collection Ecophenomenology: Back to the Earth Itself, and Bruce V. Foltz and Robert Frodeman's collection Rethinking Nature: Essays in Environmental Philosophy. This special issue aims to (...)
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  43. Alison Stone (2005). Luce Iriguray. Teaching Philosophy 28 (3):298-300.
  44. Alison Stone, Nature, Continental Philosophy, and Environmental Ethics.
    Until recently, there has been relatively little self-conscious reflection - from either environmental or continental philosophers - on the specific contributions which continental philosophy, insofar as it is a distinctive tradition, might make to environmental thought. This situation has begun to change with several recent publications, such as Charles S. Brown and Ted Toadvine's edited collection Ecophenomenology: Back to the Earth Itself, and Bruce V. Foltz and Robert Frodeman's collection Rethinking Nature: Essays in Environmental Philosophy. This special issue aims to (...)
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  45. Alison Stone, Response to Halper and Dahlstrom.
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  46. Alison Stone, Towards a Genealogical Feminism: A Reading of Judith Butler's Political Thought.
    Judith Butler's contribution to feminist political thought is usually approached in terms of her concept of performativity, according to which gender exists only insofar as it is ritualistically and repetitively performed, creating permanent possibilities for performing gender in new and transgressive ways. In this paper, I argue that Butler's politics of performativity is more fundamentally grounded in the concept of genealogy, which she adapts from Foucault and, ultimately, Nietzsche. Butler understands women to have a genealogy: to be located within a (...)
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  47. Alison Stone (2004). After Kant. The Philosophers' Magazine 27 (27):61-61.
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  48. Alison Stone (2004). Essentialism and Anti-Essentialism in Feminist Philosophy. Journal of Moral Philosophy 1 (2):135-153.
    This article revisits the ethical and political questions raised by feminist debates over essentialism, the belief that there are properties essential to women and which all women share. Feminists’ widespread rejection of essentialism has threatened to undermine feminist politics. Re-evaluating two responses to this problem—‘strategic’ essentialism and Iris Marion Young’s idea that women are an internally diverse ‘series’—I argue that both unsatisfactorily retain essentialism as a descriptive claim about the social reality of women’s lives. I argue instead that women have (...)
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  49. Alison Stone, From Political to Realist Essentialism: Rereading Luce Irigaray.
    This paper re-examines debates surrounding Irigaray's 'essentialism', arguing that these debates have generated a widespread assumption that realist essentialism is philosophically untenable and that Irigaray must therefore be read as a non-realist, merely 'political', essentialist. I suggest that this assumption is unhelpful, as Irigaray's work shows increasing commitment to a realist form of essentialism. Moreover, I argue that political essentialism is internally unstable because it aims to revalue femininity and the body as symbolised, thereby reinforcing the traditional conceptual hierarchy of (...)
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