Search results for 'Allegory_of_the_cave' (try it on Scholar)

38 found
Order:
  1. Gabriel Zamosc (forthcoming). The Political Significance of Plato's Allegory of the Cave. Ideas Y Valores 66 (165).
    Abstract: In this paper I claim that Plato’s Cave is fundamentally a political, not an epistemological image, and that only by treating it as such can we appreciate correctly its relation to the images of the Sun and the Line. On the basis of textual evidence, I question the two main assumptions that support (in my view, mistakenly) the effort to find an epistemological parallel between the Cave and the Line: first, that the prisoners represent humankind in general, and, second, (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  92
    A. S. Ferguson (1922). Plato's Simile of Light . Part II. The Allegory of the Cave. Classical Quarterly 16 (1):15-28.
    The first part of this paper argued that the traditional application of the Cave to the Line was not intended by Plato, and led to a misunderstanding of both similes. The Cave, it was said, is attached to the simile of the Sun and the Line by the visible region outside the cave, which is a reintegration of the symbolism of sun, originals and images in the sunlight, and the new system of objects inside the cave is compared and contrasted (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Betty A. Sichel (1985). Self-Knowledge and Education in Plato's Allegory of the Cave. Philosophy of Education: Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Philosophy of Education Society 41:429-439.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Jim Robinson (1992). Teaching the Allegory of the Cave. Teaching Philosophy 15 (4):329-335.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. S. Marc Cohen (2008). The Allegory of the Cave. Philosophy 320.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Dale Hall (1980). Interpreting Plato's Cave as an Allegory of the Human Condition. Apeiron 14 (2):74 - 86.
  7. Martin Heidegger & Ted Sadler (2002). The Essence of Truth on Plato's Cave Allegory and Theaetetus. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  8.  15
    Dimitra Mitta (2003). Reading Platonic Myths From a Ritualistic Point of View: Gyges' Ring and the Cave Allegory. Kernos 16:133-141.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Miguel Abensour (2007). Against the Sovereignty of Philosophy Over Politics: Arendt's Reading of Plato's Cave Allegory. Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (4):955-982.
  10.  65
    William McNeill (2003). Review of Martin Heidegger, The Essence of Human Freedom: An Introduction to Philosophy and the Essence of Truth: On Plato's Cave Allegory and Theaetetus. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (1).
  11. Maureen Eckert (2012). Cinematic Spelunking Inside Plato's Cave. Glipmse Journal 9:42-49.
    Detailed exploration of the Allegory of the Cave, utilizing notions from film studies, may provide us with insight regarding the identity of the puppet masters in Plato's allegory.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Nathan Andersen (2014). Shadow Philosophy: Plato’s Cave and Cinema. Routledge.
    Shadow Philosophy: Plato’s Cave and Cinema is an accessible and exciting new contribution to film-philosophy, which shows that to take film seriously is also to engage with the fundamental questions of philosophy. Nathan Andersen brings Stanley Kubrick’s film A Clockwork Orange into philosophical conversation with Plato’s Republic , comparing their contributions to themes such as the nature of experience and meaning, the character of justice, the contrast between appearance and reality, the importance of art, and the impact of images. At (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. James Mcguirk (2008). Aletheia And Heidegger's Transitional Readings Of Plato's Cave Allegory. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 39 (2):167-185.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  51
    Boaz Tsabar (2014). “Poverty and Resourcefulness”: On the Formative Significance of Eros in Educational Practice. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (1):75-87.
    This article seeks to examine the special quality of Eros operative in educational practice, through the frame narrative of Plato’s “The Allegory of the Cave”. The subject is examined from two aspects illuminating the paradoxical nature of educational practice. The first, epistemological, considers the practicability of learning, and the second, ethical, deals with the complexity of commitment to teaching. The resolution of the paradox, the article contends, can only be understood through the concept of “Eros”—the same mysterious driving force, devoid (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  16
    Arthur Ct Strum (2012). The Politics of “Theory” in a Late Twentieth-Century University: A Memoir. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2012 (159):132-143.
    When the character Socrates introduces his allegory of the cave at the beginning of book seven of Plato's Republic, he says that it is a story about “our nature in its education and want of education.”1 If we lack education, we grasp the passing shadows as real; if we are dragged out of the cave by force “along the rough, steep, upward way” toward the sun—that is, if we are educated—we come to recognize things as they are, and therefore the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  4
    N. Osaka (1997). In the Theatre of Working Memory of the Brain. Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (4):332-334.
    The target article by Bernard Baars presents a quick way of grasping the gist of his book In the Theater of Consciousness: The Workspace of the Mind, published recently . The metaphor of consciousness as a theatre has a long history. A prototype of the theatre model may be traced back to Plato's Allegory of the Cave, in which we are like prisoners living in a cave just observing the shadows of reality. The modern theatre model insists on consciousness being (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  78
    Stephen Buckle (2007). Descartes, Plato and the Cave. Philosophy 82 (2):338.
    It has been a commonplace, embodied in philosophy curricula the world over, to think of Descartes' philosophy as he seems to present it: as a radical break with the past, as inaugurating a new philosophical problematic centred on epistemology and on a radical dualism of mind and body. In several ways, however, recent scholarship has undermined the simplicity of this picture. It has, for example, shown the considerable degree of literary artifice in Descartes' central works, and thereby brought out the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  9
    J. Malcolm (1981). The Cave Revisited. Classical Quarterly 31 (01):60-.
    In 1962 I offered an analysis of the Line and Cave which maintained that the four main divisions of each are parallel and interpreted the three stages of ascent in the Cave allegory as representing the three stages in Plato's educational programme: music and gymnastic, mathematics and dialectic. At that time a major portion of my task was to counter arguments which purported to show that the Line and Cave could not be parallel. The present situation is quite different since (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19. Joel E. Mann (2014). Prescribing Positivism: The Dawn of Nietzsche's Hippocratism. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (1):54-67.
    Nietzsche opens D with the ironic image of a “subterranean man” who “tunnels and mines and undermines” (D P:1).1 He works in the depths, in the dark, deprived of light. Nietzsche’s description at once inverts and subverts Plato’s allegory of the cave.2 In Plato’s story, the philosopher completes a circuit from the depths of the cave below to the sunlit world above and back again. The subterranean man, by contrast, disappears from the world of light into his tunnels. Having resurfaced, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  74
    Steinar Bøyum (2010). The Concept of Philosophical Education. Educational Theory 60 (5):543-559.
    Strangely, the concept of philosophical education is not much in use, at least not as a philosophical concept. In this essay, Steinar Bøyum attempts to outline such a philosophical concept of philosophical education. Bøyum uses Plato's Allegory of the Cave, René Descartes's life of doubt, and Immanuel Kant's criticism of metaphysics as paradigms or defining examples of this concept. Bøyum's aim in this essay is not exegetical; rather, he hopes to describe these examples in a way that will let their (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  10
    Jennifer A. McMahon (2011). The Shades in Platon's Mirror: The Ethical, Political and Aesthetic in the Art of Mischa Kuball. Column 8:99-104.
    Plato’s distinction between appearance and reality which he attempts to demonstrate in his allegory of the cave established the conceptual framework for theories of knowledge for many centuries. The quest for certainty set us on the path to believing that reality is there to be discovered. We only have to open our eyes and minds. Yet a recurring question about the interface between culturally acquired concepts and objective sense perception remains a point of contention. Mischa Kuball’s Platon’s Mirror addresses this (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  22
    Kathryn T. Gines (2011). "The Man Who Lived Underground": Jean-Paul Sartre And the Philosophical Legacy of Richard Wright. Sartre Studies International 17 (2):42-59.
    Is Jean-Paul Sartre to be credited for Richard Wright's existentialist leanings? This essay argues that while there have been noteworthy philosophical exchanges between Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Richard Wright, we can find evidence of Wright's philosophical and existential leanings before his interactions with Sartre and Beauvoir. In particular, Wright's short story "The Man Who Lived Underground" is analyzed as an existential, or Black existential, project that is published before Wright met Sartre and/or read his scholarship. Existentialist themes that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  20
    N. R. Murphy (1932). The 'Simile Of Light' In Plato'S Republic. Classical Quarterly 26 (02):93-.
    At the end of Republic VI. Socrates compares the Good with the sun as a cause both of existence and intelligibility. Afterwards, when he continues and expands this comparison, the symbolism becomes so complex that the interpretation of almost every part of it is in dispute. We start with the contrast of light and darkness; to this is next added the contrast of image and original, and also of up and down along a vertical line; in the allegory of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  15
    Corinne Praus Sze (1977). EikaΣia and πiΣtiΣ in Plato's Cave Allegory. Classical Quarterly 27 (01):127-.
    This allegory is among the most well-traversed passages in Plato's dialogues and deservedly so. Its emotional impact is undeniable, yet it confronts the reader with several problems of interpretation. There is a strong sense that it is of central importance to the crucial questions of the Platonic philosopher's education and his role in society, and it possibly holds one key to an understanding of the Republic as a whole.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Christian Thomas Kohl (2012). Pratityasamutpada in Eastern and Western Modes of Thought. International Association of Buddhist Universities 4 (2012):68-80.
    Nagarjuna and Quantum physics. Eastern and Western Modes of Thought. Summary. The key terms. 1. Key term: ‘Emptiness’. The Indian philosopher Nagarjuna is known in the history of Buddhism mainly by his keyword ‘sunyata’. This word is translated into English by the word ‘emptiness’. The translation and the traditional interpretations create the impression that Nagarjuna declares the objects as empty or illusionary or not real or not existing. What is the assertion and concrete statement made by this interpretation? That nothing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  79
    Stephen Barnes (2002). Teaching Plato's Cave. Questions: Philosophy for Young People 2:6-7.
    Barnes focuses and examines Plato’s ideals on life through “Allegory of the Cave”. The nature of selfhood, moral/ political issues, and enlightenment demonstrate in any classroom the alternatives to a dry session on philosophy to young children through an engaging discussion.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  35
    A. Kim (2004). Shades of Truth. Idealistic Studies 34 (1):1-24.
    Plato’s allegory of the cave tells of the soul’s advance from ignorance to knowledge, leaving open the question of what this knowledge is and what its objects are. Heidegger’s 1947 analysis of the allegory is of course just one of many. However, as I argue in this paper, if we read that analysis in the context of Husserlian phenomenology, we find a remarkable congruence between the latter’s process of “eidetic reduction” and the ascent out of the cave. In §1, I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  25
    Anne-Marie Bowery (2001). Drawing Shadows on the Wall. Teaching Philosophy 24 (2):121-132.
    This paper incorporates the work that Jeffrey Gold, Jim Robinson, and Jonathan Schonsheck have done into an innovative method for teaching Plato’s Allegory of the Cave. The method involves breaking students into small groups and asking them to draw three images that depict the plot of the Allegory of the Cave. In addition to giving a description of this activity and detailing the pedagogical benefits, the paper considers possible objections to this exercise and suggests that this method provides a model (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  3
    Michele C. Henderson, M. Gregory Oakes & Marilyn Smith (2009). What Plato Knew About Enron. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (4):463-471.
    This paper applies Plato's cave allegory to Enron's success and downfall. Plato's famous tale of cave dwellers illustrates the different levels of truth and understanding. These levels include images, the sources of images, and the ultimate reality behind both. The paper first describes these levels of perception as they apply to Plato's cave dwellers and then provides a brief history of the rise of Enron. Then we apply Plato's levels of understanding to Enron, showing how the company created its image (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  51
    Michele C. Henderson, M. Gregory Oakes & Marilyn Smith (2009). What Plato Knew About Enron. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (4):463 - 471.
    This paper applies Plato’s cave allegory to Enron’s success and downfall. Plato’s famous tale of cave dwellers illustrates the different levels of truth and understanding. These levels include images, the sources of images, and the ultimate reality behind both. The paper first describes these levels of perception as they apply to Plato’s cave dwellers and then provides a brief history of the rise of Enron. Then we apply Plato’s levels of understanding to Enron, showing how the company created its image (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  30
    Iain Thomson (2001). Heidegger on Ontological Education, Or: How We Become What We Are. Inquiry 44 (3):243 – 268.
    Heidegger presciently diagnosed the current crisis in higher education. Contemporary theorists like Bill Readings extend and update Heidegger's critique, documenting the increasing instrumentalization, professionalization, vocationalization, corporatization, and technologization of the modern university, the dissolution of its unifying and guiding ideals, and, consequently, the growing hyper-specialization and ruinous fragmentation of its departments. Unlike Heidegger, however, these critics do not recognize such disturbing trends as interlocking symptoms of an underlying ontological problem and so they provide no positive vision for the future of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  32. Graciela E. Marcos de Pinotti (2012). Mimesis y distancia de la verdad en República y Sofista. Apuntes Filosóficos 19 (34).
    En República, libro X, Platón justifica su exclusión de la poesía imitativa mediante argumentos metafísicos y psicológicos. Al hacerlo, enfatiza la distancia de los productos de la imitación respecto de la verdad, y los condena porque apelan al elemento inferior del alma. En Sofista 233d- 236c, se propone una crítica similar contra la sofistería. El imitador puede hacer eidola, que puede ser considerado como real por un ignorante. En ambos casos Platón se refiere a la distancia respecto de la verdad (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Lucas Verduga Santillán (2012). Anábasis y periagogé: la educación del filósofo-gobernante en la República de Platón. Apuntes Filosóficos 19 (34).
    A lo largo de este trabajo se intentará realizar un estudio sobre las distintas etapas del programa educativo presentado por Platón en República VII y observar su relación con la alegoría de la caverna y el símil de la línea dividida. La mirada se enfocará en dos de los movimientos claramente descritos en dicha alegoría: la rotación (periagogé) y la ascensión (anábasis). ¿Cuál de las enseñanzas propuestas por el autor es la que posibilita la rotación del ojo del alma?, ¿En (...)
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  22
    Dan Passell (2000). Plato's “Introduction to Philosophy”. Teaching Philosophy 23 (4):315-328.
    This paper argues that Plato’s “what-is-T” questions offer a more instructive method for introducing students to philosophy than his use of the Allegory of the Cave. In supporting this claim, the paper presents a Socratic dialogue that illustrates how what-is-T questions along with an answer to said questions via a list can be used as a starting point for introducing philosophy. However, this Socratic dialogue also reveals that this initial answer cannot succeed and so it motivates Plato’s preferred answer which (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Plato (1999). Plato's Republic, Books Seven & Eight: Audio Cd. Agora Publications.
    Book Seven of The Republic begins with the famous Allegory of the Cave, an exploration of the natural process of being educated. Socrates and Glaucon probe the meaning of this story both as it relates to the discussion of knowledge and reality developed earlier and to the concept of dialectic, the over-all method of Plato's dialogues. In Book Eight, Socrates and Plato's brothers explore five different kinds of republic and five different kinds of individual, showing how aristocracy becomes timocracy and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Plato (forthcoming). Plato's Republic, Books Seven & Eight. Audio CD.
    Book Seven of The Republic begins with the famous Allegory of the Cave, an exploration of the natural process of being educated. Socrates and Glaucon probe the meaning of this story both as it relates to the discussion of knowledge and reality developed earlier and to the concept of dialectic, the over-all method of Plato's dialogues. In Book Eight, Socrates and Plato's brothers explore five different kinds of republic and five different kinds of individual, showing how aristocracy becomes timocracy and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  13
    Elizabeth A. Hoppe (2011). How to Persuade Those Who Will Not Listen. Clr James Journal 17 (1):58-74.
    Western philosophy owes its origin to the dialogues of Plato. Not only does Plato provide us with a methodology that remains significant today, his views in many ways correspond to the revolutionary philosophies of Paulo Freire and bell hooks. In reflecting on Plato's view of education in the Cave Allegory in Book VII of the Republic (1991), one can readily see its affinity with Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed (2009); however, it is also important to keep in mind that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  9
    Lauren Haaftern-Schick & Sura Levine (2011). Remembering Robert Seydel. Continent 1 (2):141-144.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 141-144. This January, while preparing a new course, Robert Seydel was struck and killed by an unexpected heart attack. He was a critically under-appreciated artist and one of the most beloved and admired professors at Hampshire College. At the time of his passing, Seydel was on the brink of a major artistic and career milestone. His Book of Ruth was being prepared for publication by Siglio Press. His publisher describes the book as: “an alchemical assemblage that composes (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography