Search results for 'Allegory_of_the_cave' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Betty A. Sichel (1985). Self-Knowledge and Education in Plato's Allegory of the Cave. Philosophy of Education: Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Philosophy of Education Society 41:429-439.score: 666.0
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  2. Maureen Eckert (2012). Cinematic Spelunking Inside Plato's Cave. Glipmse Journal 9:42-49.score: 648.0
    Detailed exploration of the Allegory of the Cave, utilizing notions from film studies, may provide us with insight regarding the identity of the puppet masters in Plato's allegory.
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  3. Jim Robinson (1992). Teaching the Allegory of the Cave. Teaching Philosophy 15 (4):329-335.score: 612.0
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  4. S. Marc Cohen (2008). The Allegory of the Cave. Philosophy 320.score: 612.0
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  5. Dale Hall (1980). Interpreting Plato's Cave as an Allegory of the Human Condition. Apeiron 14 (2):74 - 86.score: 603.0
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  6. Dimitra Mitta (2003). Reading Platonic Myths From a Ritualistic Point of View: Gyges' Ring and the Cave Allegory. Kernos 16:133-141.score: 594.0
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  7. William McNeill (2003). Review of Martin Heidegger, The Essence of Human Freedom: An Introduction to Philosophy and the Essence of Truth: On Plato's Cave Allegory and Theaetetus. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (1).score: 576.0
  8. Miguel Abensour (2007). Against the Sovereignty of Philosophy Over Politics: Arendt's Reading of Plato's Cave Allegory. Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (4):955-982.score: 576.0
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  9. Boaz Tsabar (2014). “Poverty and Resourcefulness”: On the Formative Significance of Eros in Educational Practice. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (1):75-87.score: 456.0
    This article seeks to examine the special quality of Eros operative in educational practice, through the frame narrative of Plato’s “The Allegory of the Cave”. The subject is examined from two aspects illuminating the paradoxical nature of educational practice. The first, epistemological, considers the practicability of learning, and the second, ethical, deals with the complexity of commitment to teaching. The resolution of the paradox, the article contends, can only be understood through the concept of “Eros”—the same mysterious driving force, devoid (...)
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  10. Joel E. Mann (2014). Prescribing Positivism: The Dawn of Nietzsche's Hippocratism. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (1):54-67.score: 360.0
    Nietzsche opens D with the ironic image of a “subterranean man” who “tunnels and mines and undermines” (D P:1).1 He works in the depths, in the dark, deprived of light. Nietzsche’s description at once inverts and subverts Plato’s allegory of the cave.2 In Plato’s story, the philosopher completes a circuit from the depths of the cave below to the sunlit world above and back again. The subterranean man, by contrast, disappears from the world of light into his tunnels. Having resurfaced, (...)
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  11. Steinar Bøyum (2010). The Concept of Philosophical Education. Educational Theory 60 (5):543-559.score: 348.0
    Strangely, the concept of philosophical education is not much in use, at least not as a philosophical concept. In this essay, Steinar Bøyum attempts to outline such a philosophical concept of philosophical education. Bøyum uses Plato's Allegory of the Cave, René Descartes's life of doubt, and Immanuel Kant's criticism of metaphysics as paradigms or defining examples of this concept. Bøyum's aim in this essay is not exegetical; rather, he hopes to describe these examples in a way that will let their (...)
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  12. Kathryn T. Gines (2012). "The Man Who Lived Underground": Jean-Paul Sartre And the Philosophical Legacy of Richard Wright. Sartre Studies International 17 (2):42-59.score: 348.0
    Is Jean-Paul Sartre to be credited for Richard Wright's existentialist leanings? This essay argues that while there have been noteworthy philosophical exchanges between Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Richard Wright, we can find evidence of Wright's philosophical and existential leanings before his interactions with Sartre and Beauvoir. In particular, Wright's short story "The Man Who Lived Underground" is analyzed as an existential, or Black existential, project that is published before Wright met Sartre and/or read his scholarship. Existentialist themes that (...)
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  13. Stephen Barnes (2002). Teaching Plato's Cave. Questions: Philosophy for Young People 2:6-7.score: 240.0
    Barnes focuses and examines Plato’s ideals on life through “Allegory of the Cave”. The nature of selfhood, moral/ political issues, and enlightenment demonstrate in any classroom the alternatives to a dry session on philosophy to young children through an engaging discussion.
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  14. Michelle Boulous Walker (1998). Philosophy and the Maternal Body: Reading Silence. Routledge.score: 240.0
    Philosophy and the Maternal Body is a fascinating exploration of an overlooked aspect of feminist thought: what is the role of maternity in philosophy and in what ways has it been used by male theorists to effectively "silence" the voices of women in philosophy? Drawing on rich examples such as Plato's allegory of the cave, Sigmund Freud and Melanie Klein's writing on the mother and the mother-daughter relationship, and the psychoanalytic and feminist insights of Irigaray and Kristeva, Michelle Boulous Walker (...)
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  15. A. Kim (2004). Shades of Truth. Idealistic Studies 34 (1):1-24.score: 240.0
    Plato’s allegory of the cave tells of the soul’s advance from ignorance to knowledge, leaving open the question of what this knowledge is and what its objects are. Heidegger’s 1947 analysis of the allegory is of course just one of many. However, as I argue in this paper, if we read that analysis in the context of Husserlian phenomenology, we find a remarkable congruence between the latter’s process of “eidetic reduction” and the ascent out of the cave. In §1, I (...)
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  16. Nathan Andersen (2014). Shadow Philosophy: Plato's Cave and Cinema. Routledge.score: 240.0
    Shadow Philosophy: Plato’s Cave and Cinema is an accessible and exciting new contribution to film-philosophy, that shows why to take film seriously is also to engage with the fundamental questions of philosophy. Nathan Andersen brings Stanley Kubrick’s film A Clockwork Orange into philosophical conversation with Plato’s Republic , comparing their contributions to themes such as the nature of experience and meaning, the character of justice, the contrast between appearance and reality, the importance of art, and the impact of images. At (...)
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  17. Michele C. Henderson, M. Gregory Oakes & Marilyn Smith (2009). What Plato Knew About Enron. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (4):463 - 471.score: 210.0
    This paper applies Plato’s cave allegory to Enron’s success and downfall. Plato’s famous tale of cave dwellers illustrates the different levels of truth and understanding. These levels include images, the sources of images, and the ultimate reality behind both. The paper first describes these levels of perception as they apply to Plato’s cave dwellers and then provides a brief history of the rise of Enron. Then we apply Plato’s levels of understanding to Enron, showing how the company created its image (...)
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  18. Iain Thomson (2001). Heidegger on Ontological Education, Or: How We Become What We Are. Inquiry 44 (3):243 – 268.score: 204.0
    Heidegger presciently diagnosed the current crisis in higher education. Contemporary theorists like Bill Readings extend and update Heidegger's critique, documenting the increasing instrumentalization, professionalization, vocationalization, corporatization, and technologization of the modern university, the dissolution of its unifying and guiding ideals, and, consequently, the growing hyper-specialization and ruinous fragmentation of its departments. Unlike Heidegger, however, these critics do not recognize such disturbing trends as interlocking symptoms of an underlying ontological problem and so they provide no positive vision for the future of (...)
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  19. Lucas Verduga Santillán (2012). Anábasis y periagogé: la educación del filósofo-gobernante en la República de Platón. Apuntes Filosóficos 19 (34).score: 204.0
    A lo largo de este trabajo se intentará realizar un estudio sobre las distintas etapas del programa educativo presentado por Platón en República VII y observar su relación con la alegoría de la caverna y el símil de la línea dividida. La mirada se enfocará en dos de los movimientos claramente descritos en dicha alegoría: la rotación (periagogé) y la ascensión (anábasis). ¿Cuál de las enseñanzas propuestas por el autor es la que posibilita la rotación del ojo del alma?, ¿En (...)
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  20. Graciela E. Marcos de Pinotti (2012). Mimesis y distancia de la verdad en República y Sofista. Apuntes Filosóficos 19 (34).score: 204.0
    En República, libro X, Platón justifica su exclusión de la poesía imitativa mediante argumentos metafísicos y psicológicos. Al hacerlo, enfatiza la distancia de los productos de la imitación respecto de la verdad, y los condena porque apelan al elemento inferior del alma. En Sofista 233d- 236c, se propone una crítica similar contra la sofistería. El imitador puede hacer eidola, que puede ser considerado como real por un ignorante. En ambos casos Platón se refiere a la distancia respecto de la verdad (...)
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  21. Elizabeth A. Hoppe (2011). How to Persuade Those Who Will Not Listen. Clr James Journal 17 (1):58-74.score: 198.0
    Western philosophy owes its origin to the dialogues of Plato. Not only does Plato provide us with a methodology that remains significant today, his views in many ways correspond to the revolutionary philosophies of Paulo Freire and bell hooks. In reflecting on Plato's view of education in the Cave Allegory in Book VII of the Republic (1991), one can readily see its affinity with Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed (2009); however, it is also important to keep in mind that (...)
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  22. Lauren Haaftern-Schick & Sura Levine (2011). Remembering Robert Seydel. Continent 1 (2):141-144.score: 198.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 141-144. This January, while preparing a new course, Robert Seydel was struck and killed by an unexpected heart attack. He was a critically under-appreciated artist and one of the most beloved and admired professors at Hampshire College. At the time of his passing, Seydel was on the brink of a major artistic and career milestone. His Book of Ruth was being prepared for publication by Siglio Press. His publisher describes the book as: “an alchemical assemblage that composes (...)
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  23. Christopher John Shields (2012/2011). Ancient Philosophy: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge.score: 68.0
    In this re-titled and substantially revised update of his Classical Philosophy (2003), Christopher Shields expands his coverage to include the Hellenistic era, and now offers an introduction to more than 1,000 years of ancient philosophy. From Thales and other Pre-Socratics through Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, and on to Epicureanism, Stoicism, and Scepticism, Ancient Philosophy traces the important connections between these periods and individuals without losing sight of the novelties and dynamics unique to each. The coverage of Plato and Aristotle also (...)
     
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  24. Federico Stella (2013). La prigionia e la salvezza dell'anima da Avicenna a Suhrawardî: quali fonti? Doctor Virtualis 12.score: 67.0
    In questo articolo verrà preso in esame il tema della prigionia dell’anima e della sua successiva liberazione, partendo da uno dei tre racconti visionari di Avicenna, intitolato Hayy Ibn Yaqzân e indagandone le fonti filosofiche. Si partirà dall’analisi del il mito della caverna di Platone e dell’interpretazione allegorica data ad esso dal filosofo al-Fārābī. Tenendo presente questa lettura, saranno sviluppate alcune riflessioni sull’oggetto e sul significato di questi racconti visionari: allegorie filosofiche sulla natura della conoscenza (interpretazione cui propendeva anche Suhrawardi (...)
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