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Profile: Allen Buchanan (Duke University)
  1. Allen E. Buchanan, Dan W. Brock, Norman Daniels & Daniel Wikler (2000). From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice. Cambridge University Press.
    This book, written by four internationally renowned bioethicists and first published in 2000, was the first systematic treatment of the fundamental ethical issues underlying the application of genetic technologies to human beings. Probing the implications of the remarkable advances in genetics, the authors ask how should these affect our understanding of distributive justice, equality of opportunity, the rights and obligations as parents, the meaning of disability, and the role of the concept of human nature in ethical theory and practice. The (...)
     
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  2. Allen E. Buchanan (2004). Justice, Legitimacy, and Self-Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law. Oxford University Press.
    This book articulates a systematic vision of an international legal system grounded in the commitment to justice for all persons. It provides a probing exploration of the moral issues involved in disputes about secession, ethno-national conflict, "the right of self-determination of peoples," human rights, and the legitimacy of the international legal system itself. Buchanan advances vigorous criticisms of the central dogmas of international relations and international law, arguing that the international legal system should make justice, not simply peace among states, (...)
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  3. Allen E. Buchanan (2011). Beyond Humanity?: The Ethics of Biomedical Enhancement. Oxford University Press.
    In Beyond Humanity a leading philosopher offers a powerful and controversial exploration of urgent ethical issues concerning human enhancement.
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  4.  2
    Allen E. Buchanan (1989). Deciding for Others: The Ethics of Surrogate Decisionmaking. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the most comprehensive treatment available of one of the most urgent--and yet in some respects most neglected--problems in bioethics: decisionmaking for incompetents. Part I develops a general theory for making treatment and care decisions for patients who are not competent to decide for themselves. It provides an in-depth analysis of competence, articulates and defends a coherent set of principles to specify suitable surrogate decisionmakers and to guide their choices, examines the value of advance directives, and investigates the (...)
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  5. Allen Buchanan & Robert O. Keohane (2006). The Legitimacy of Global Governance Institutions. Ethics and International Affairs 20 (4):405–437.
    The authors articulate a global public standard for the normative legitimacy of global governance institutions. This standard can provide the basis for principled criticism of global governance institutions and guide reform efforts in circumstances in which people disagree deeply about the demands of global justice and the role that global governance institutions should play in meeting them.
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  6. Allen Buchanan (2009). Human Nature and Enhancement. Bioethics 23 (3):141-150.
    Appeals to the idea of human nature are frequent in the voluminous literature on the ethics of enhancing human beings through biotechnology. Two chief concerns about the impact of enhancements on human nature have been voiced. The first is that enhancement may alter or destroy human nature. The second is that if enhancement alters or destroys human nature, this will undercut our ability to ascertain the good because, for us, the good is determined by our nature. The first concern assumes (...)
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  7.  84
    Russell Powell & Allen Buchanan (2011). Breaking Evolution's Chains: The Prospect of Deliberate Genetic Modification in Humans. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (1):6-27.
    Many philosophers invoke the "wisdom of nature" in arguing for varying degrees of caution in the development and use of genetic enhancement technologies. Because they view natural selection as akin to a master engineer that creates functionally and morally optimal design, these authors tend to regard genetic intervention with suspicion. In Part II, we examine and ultimately reject the evolutionary assumptions that underlie the master engineer analogy (MEA). By highlighting the constraints on ordinary unassisted evolution, we show how intentional genetic (...)
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  8. Allen Buchanan (2002). Political Legitimacy and Democracy. Ethics 112 (4):689-719.
  9. Allen Buchanan (2000). Rawls's Law of Peoples: Rules for a Vanished Westphalian World. Ethics 110 (4):697-721.
  10. Allen Buchanan & Robert O. Keohane (2004). The Preventive Use of Force: A Cosmopolitan Institutional Proposal. Ethics and International Affairs 18 (1):1–22.
    Accountability is the key to ensuring the fairness of rules governing the preventive use of force. Buchanan and Keohane propose a scheme that would make those promoting and those rejecting the preventive use of force more accountable.
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  11. Allen Buchanan, Dan W. Brock, Norman Daniels & Daniel Wikler (2001). From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice. Philosophy 76 (297):472-475.
    This book, written by four internationally renowned bioethicists and first published in 2000, was the first systematic treatment of the fundamental ethical issues underlying the application of genetic technologies to human beings. Probing the implications of the remarkable advances in genetics, the authors ask how should these affect our understanding of distributive justice, equality of opportunity, the rights and obligations as parents, the meaning of disability, and the role of the concept of human nature in ethical theory and practice. The (...)
     
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  12.  48
    Allen Buchanan & Russell Powell (2015). The Limits of Evolutionary Explanations of Morality and Their Implications for Moral Progress. Ethics 126 (1):37-67.
    Traditional conservative arguments against the possibility of moral progress relied on underevidenced assumptions about the limitations of human nature. Contemporary thinkers have attempted to fill this empirical gap in the conservative argument by appealing to evolutionary science. Such “evoconservative” arguments fail because they overstate the explanatory reach of evolutionary theory. We maintain that no adequate evolutionary explanation has been given for important features of human morality, namely cosmopolitan and other “inclusivist” moral commitments. We attribute these evolutionarily anomalous features to a (...)
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  13. Allen Buchanan (1997). Theories of Secession. Philosophy and Public Affairs 26 (1):31–61.
    All theories of the right to secede either understand the right as a remedial right only or also recognize a primary right to secede. By a right in this context is meant a general, not a special, right (one generated through promising, contract, or some special relationship). Remedial Right Only Theories assert that a group has a general right to secede if and only if it has suffered certain injustices, for which secession is the appropriate remedy of last resort.1 Different (...)
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  14. Allen Buchanan (1988). Advance Directives and the Personal Identity Problem. Philosophy and Public Affairs 17 (4):277-302.
  15. Allen Buchanan (2009). Moral Status and Human Enhancement. Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (4):346-381.
  16. Allen Buchanan (2002). Social Moral Epistemology. Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):126-152.
    The distinctive aim of applied ethics is to provide guidance as to how we ought to act, as individuals and as shapers of social policies. In this essay, I argue that applied ethics as currently practiced is inadequate and ought to be transformed to incorporate what I shall call social moral epistemology. This is a branch of social epistemology, the study of the social practices and institutions that promote the formation, preservation, and transmission of true beliefs. For example, social epistemologists (...)
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  17.  28
    Allen Buchanan (2010). Human Rights, Legitimacy, and the Use of Force. OUP Usa.
    This volume collects Allen Buchanan's previously published articles with a focus on ethics and international law, specifically with regard to human rights, the legitimacy of international institutions, and the ethics of force across borders. The work fits together tightly in its systematic interconnections, and collectively it makes the case for a holistic and systematic approach to issues that are at the forefront of current discussions in political and legal philosophy- issues that have traditionally been seen as separate.
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  18. Allen Buchanan (2010). The Egalitarianism of Human Rights. Ethics 120 (4):679-710.
  19. Allen Buchanan (2008). Enhancement and the Ethics of Development. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (1):pp. 1-34.
    Much of the debate about the ethics of enhancement has proceeded according to two framing assumptions. The first is that although enhancement carries large social risks, the chief benefits of enhancement are to those who are enhanced (or their parents, in the case of enhancing the traits of children). The second is that, because we now understand the wrongs of state-driven eugenics, enhancements, at least in liberal societies, will be personal goods, chosen or not chosen in a market for enhancement (...)
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  20. Allen E. Buchanan (1989). Assessing the Communitarian Critique of Liberalism. Ethics 99 (4):852-882.
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  21. Allen Buchanan (2009). Philosophy and Public Policy: A Role for Social Moral Epistemology. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (3):276-290.
    abstract Part 1 of this essay argues that one of the most important contributions of philosophers to sound public policy may be to combat the influence of bad Philosophy (which includes, but is not limited to, bad Philosophy produced by accredited academic philosophers). Part 2 argues that the conventional conception of Practical Ethics (CPE) that philosophers bring to issues of public policy is defective because it fails to take seriously the phenomenon of the subversion of morality, the role of false (...)
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  22. Allen E. Buchanan (1984). The Right to a Decent Minimum of Health Care. Philosophy and Public Affairs 13 (1):55-78.
  23.  50
    Allen Buchanan (2013). The Ethics of Revolution and Its Implications for the Ethics of Intervention. Philosophy and Public Affairs 41 (4):291-323.
  24. Allen Buchanan (1999). Recognitional Legitimacy and the State System. Philosophy and Public Affairs 28 (1):46–78.
  25. Allen Buchanan (2004). Political Liberalism and Social Epistemology. Philosophy and Public Affairs 32 (2):95–130.
  26.  23
    Allen Buchanan (2012). Better Than Human: The Promise and Perils of Enhancing Ourselves. OUP Usa.
    In Better than Human, noted bioethicist Allen Buchanan grapples with the ethical dilemmas of the medical revolution and biomedical enhancements. One problem, he argues, is that the debate over these enhancements has divided into polar extremes--into denunciations of meddling in the natural order, or else a heady optimism that we can cure all that ails humanity. In fact, Buchanan notes, the human genome has always been unstable, and intervention is no offense against nature.
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  27.  53
    Allen Buchanan (2006). Institutionalizing the Just War. Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (1):2–38.
  28.  18
    Allen Buchanan (2014). The Heart of Human Rights. OUP Usa.
    This book is the first in-depth attempt to provide a moral assessment of the heart of the modern human rights enterprise: the system of international legal human rights.
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  29. Allen Buchanan, Secession. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  30.  82
    Allen Buchanan (2007). Institutions, Beliefs and Ethics: Eugenics as a Case Study. Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (1):22–45.
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  31.  30
    Allen Buchanan (2009). Justice and Health Care: Selected Essays. OUP Usa.
    This book brings together ten influential essays on justice and healthcare, written by a major figure in bioethics and political philosophy. What emerges is a systematic and unified approach to the issues that challenges widely-held dogmas and unsettles the framing assumptions of a number of prominent debates. Unlike most work in bioethics, this book takes the problem of implementing justice seriously, exploring the relationship between institutions, incentives, and moral commitments.
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  32.  41
    Allen Buchanan (1993). Secession: The Morality of Political Divorce, From Fort Sumter to Lithuania and Quebec. Philosophical Review 102 (4):622-624.
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  33.  15
    Allen Buchanan (2015). Self-Determination, Revolution, and Intervention. Ethics 126 (2):447-473.
    What limitations on intervention in support of democratic revolutions does proper regard for the collective right of self-determination impose? Some have held that if intervention in support of democratic revolutions is justified, it must cease once the authoritarian regime has been deposed—that any effort by the intervener to use force to shape the new political order would violate the people’s right of self-determination. This essay argues that proper regard for self-determination is compatible with much more extensive interventions.
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  34. Allen Buchanan (1979). Revolutionary Motivation and Rationality. Philosophy and Public Affairs 9 (1):59-82.
  35.  83
    Allen Buchanan (1987). Justice and Charity. Ethics 97 (3):558-575.
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  36. Ruth Chang, Allen Buchanan, Mathias Risse, Scott A. Anderson & Thaddeus Metz (2002). 10. Nenad Miscevic, Ed., Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict: Philosophical Perspectives Nenad Miscevic, Ed., Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict: Philosophical Perspectives (Pp. 843-846). [REVIEW] Ethics 112 (4).
     
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  37.  10
    Allen Buchanan (1996). Perfecting Imperfect Duties: Collective Action to Create Moral Obligations. Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (1):27-42.
    Ethical problems in business include not only genuine moral dilemmas and compliance problems but also problems arising from the distinctive characteristics of imperfect duties. Collective action by business to perfect imperfect duties can yield significant benefits. Sucharrrangements can reduce temptations to moral laxity, achieve greater efficiency by eliminating redundancies and gaps that plague uncoordinated individual efforts, reap economies of scale and achieve success where benefits can be provided only if a certain threshold of resources can be brought to bear on (...)
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  38.  89
    Allen Buchanan, Tony Cole & Robert O. Keohane (2011). Justice in the Diffusion of Innovation. Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (3):306-332.
  39.  30
    Allen E. Buchanan, Andrea Califano, Jeffrey Kahn, Elizabeth McPherson, John A. Robertson & Baruch A. Brody (2002). Pharmacogenetics: Ethical Issues and Policy Options. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (1):1-15.
    : Pharmacogenetics offers the prospect of an era of safer and more effective drugs, as well as more individualized use of drug therapies. Before the benefits of pharmacogenetics can be realized, the ethical issues that arise in research and clinical application of pharmacogenetic technologies must be addressed. The ethical issues raised by pharmacogenetics can be addressed under six headings: regulatory oversight, confidentiality and privacy, informed consent, availability of drugs, access, and clinicians' changing responsibilities in the era of pharmacogenetic medicine. We (...)
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  40. Allen Buchanan (1990). Justice as Reciprocity Versus Subject-Centered Justice. Philosophy and Public Affairs 19 (3):227-252.
  41. Allen E. Buchanan (2013). Beyond Humanity?: The Ethics of Biomedical Enhancement. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Biotechnologies already on the horizon will enable us to be smarter, have better memories, be stronger and quicker, have more stamina, live longer, be more resistant to diseases, and enjoy richer emotional lives. To some of us, these prospects are heartening; to others, they are dreadful. In Beyond Humanity, Allen E. Buchanan offers a powerful and controversial exploration of urgent ethical issues concerning human enhancement. He argues that there are powerful reasons for us to embark on the enhancement enterprise, and (...)
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  42.  43
    Allen E. Buchanan (1985). Ethics, Efficiency, and the Market. Rowman & Allanheld.
    This is a systematic evaluation of the main arguments for and against the market as an instrument of social organization, balancing efficiency and justice .
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  43.  11
    Gerald Dworkin, Allen E. Buchanan & Dan W. Brock (1991). Deciding for Others. Philosophical Quarterly 41 (162):118.
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  44. John Tasioulas, Allen Buchanan, Rainer Forst, James Griffin, Mikhail Valdman & Louis‐Philippe Hodgson (2010). 10. Daniel Markovits, A Modern Legal Ethics: Adversary Advocacy in a Democratic Age Daniel Markovits, A Modern Legal Ethics: Adversary Advocacy in a Democratic Age (Pp. 864-869). [REVIEW] Ethics 120 (4).
     
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  45.  12
    Allen Buchanan & Robert O. Keohane (2011). Precommitment Regimes for Intervention: Supplementing the Security Council. Ethics and International Affairs 25 (1):41-63.
    We consider two different types of alternatives to the Security Council for authorizing military action across borders: a democratic coalition and a precommitment regime, by which a state could authorize intervention within its territory in advance and designate the intervenors.
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  46.  77
    Allen Buchanan & Matthew DeCamp (2006). Responsibility for Global Health. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (1):95-114.
    There are several reasons for the current prominence of global health issues. Among the most important is the growing awareness that some risks to health are global in scope and can only be countered by global cooperation. In addition, human rights discourse and, more generally, the articulation of a coherent cosmopolitan ethical perspective that acknowledges the importance of all persons, regardless of where they live, provide a normative basis for taking global health seriously as a moral issue. In this paper (...)
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  47.  56
    Allen Buchanan (1996). Choosing Who Will Be Disabled: Genetic Intervention and the Morality of Inclusion. Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (2):18.
    The Nobel prize-winning molecular biologist Walter Gilbert described the mapping and sequencing of the human genome as “the grail of molecular biology.” The implication, endorsed by enthusiasts for the new genetics, is that possessing a comprehensive knowledge of human genetics, like possessing the Holy Grail, will give us miraculous powers to heal the sick, and to reduce human suffering and disabilities. Indeed, the rhetoric invoked to garner public support for the Human Genome Project appears to appeal to the best of (...)
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  48. Allen E. Buchanan (1987). Marx, Morality, and History: An Assessment of Recent Analytical Work on Marx. Ethics 98 (1):104-136.
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  49. Allen Buchanan & Margaret Moore (eds.) (2004). States, Nations and Borders: The Ethics of Making Boundaries. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume examines comparatively the views and principles of seven prominent ethical traditions on one of the most pressing issues of modern politics - the making and unmaking of state and national boundaries. The traditions represented are Judaism, Christianity, Islam, natural law, Confucianism, liberalism and international law. Each contributor, an expert within one of these traditions, shows how that tradition can handle the five dominant methods of altering state and national boundaries: conquest, settlement, purchase, inheritance and secession. Written by a (...)
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  50.  16
    Allen Buchanan (1996). Toward a Theory of the Ethics of Bureaucratic Organizations. Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (4):419-440.
    This essay articulates a crucial and neglected element of a general theory of the ethics of bureaucratic organizations, both private andpublic. The key to the approach developed here is the thesis that the distinctive ethical principles applicable to bureaucratic organizations are responses to the distinctive agency-risks that arise from the nature of bureaucratic organizations as complex webs of principal/agent relationships. It is argued that the most important and distinctive ethical principles for bureaucratic organizations express commitments on the part of bureaucrats (...)
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