Search results for 'Allen S. Keller' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Desiderius Erasmus, Helen Mary Allen & John Wilson (1913). The Praise of Folly, Tr. By J. Wilson, Ed. By Mrs.P. S. Allen.
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  2.  20
    Allen S. Keller (2006). Torture in Abu Ghraib. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49 (4):553-569.
  3. Michael J. B. Allen (1989). Icastes: Marsilio Ficino's Interpretation of Plato's Sophist, Five Studies, with a Critical Edition and Translation. University of California Press.
    Michael Allen's latest work on the profoundly influential Florentine thinker of the fifteenth century, Marsilio Ficino, will be welcomed by philosophers, literary scholars, and historians of the Renaissance, as well as by classicists. Ficino was responsible for inaugurating, shaping, and disseminating the wide-ranging philosophico-cultural movement known as Renaissance Platonism, and his views on the _Sophist_, which he saw as Plato's preeminent ontological dialogue, are of signal interest. This dialogue also served Ficino as a vehicle for exploring a number of (...)
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  4. R. E. Allen (2012). Plato's Euthyphro and the Earlier Theory of Forms : A Re-Interpretation of the Republic. Routledge.
    Plato’s Euthyphro is important because it gives an excellent example of Socratic dialogue in operation and of the connection of that dialectic with Plato’s earlier theory of Forms. Professor Allen’s edition of the dialogue provides a translation with interspersed commentary, aimed both at helping the reader who does not have Greek and also elucidating the discussion of the earlier Theory of Forms which follows. The author argues that there is a theory of Forms in the Euthyphro and in other (...)
     
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  5. R. E. Allen (2014). Plato's Euthyphro and the Earlier Theory of Forms (Rle: Plato): A Re-Interpretation of the Republic. Routledge.
    Plato’s Euthyphro is important because it gives an excellent example of Socratic dialogue in operation and of the connection of that dialectic with Plato’s earlier theory of Forms. Professor Allen’s edition of the dialogue provides a translation with interspersed commentary, aimed both at helping the reader who does not have Greek and also elucidating the discussion of the earlier Theory of Forms which follows. The author argues that there is a theory of Forms in the Euthyphro and in other (...)
     
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  6. R. E. Allen (2012). Plato's Euthyphro and the Earlier Theory of Forms : A Re-Interpretation of the Republic. Routledge.
    Plato’s _Euthyphro_ is important because it gives an excellent example of Socratic dialogue in operation and of the connection of that dialectic with Plato’s earlier theory of Forms. Professor Allen’s edition of the dialogue provides a translation with interspersed commentary, aimed both at helping the reader who does not have Greek and also elucidating the discussion of the earlier Theory of Forms which follows. The author argues that there is a theory of Forms in the _Euthyphro_ and in other (...)
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  7.  3
    Derek Allen (1993). Relevance, Conduction and Canada's Rape-Shield Decision. Informal Logic 15 (2).
    I examine a Canadian Supreme Court decision concerning the constitutionality of Canada's 1982 rape-shield legislation, and suggest how material from the decision might profitably be used in an informal-logic class in connection with the topics of relevance and conductive argument. I also consider theoretical matters related to the decision: first I develop two analyses of what I call an argument from 'unchasteness' and connect them to George Bowles's theory of propositional relevance; then I present Trudy Govier with a problem in (...)
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  8. James S. Allen (1987). Obedience, Struggle, and Revolt: The Historical Vision of Balzac's Father Goriot. Clio 16 (2):103-119.
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  9. William S. Allen (2015). The Absolute Milieu: Blanchot’s Aesthetics of Melancholy. Research in Phenomenology 45 (1):53-86.
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  10.  28
    Barry G. Allen (1989). Gruesome Arithmetic: Kripke's Sceptic Replies. Dialogue 28 (2):257-264.
  11.  52
    Brandon Brown, Janni Kinsler, Morenike O. Folayan, Karen Allen & Carlos F. Cáceres (2014). Post-Approval Monitoring and Oversight of U.S.-Initiated Human Subjects Research in Resource-Constrained Countries. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):119-123.
    The history of human subjects research and controversial procedures in relation to it has helped form the field of bioethics. Ethically questionable elements may be identified during research design, research implementation, management at the study site, or actions by a study’s investigator or other staff. Post-approval monitoring (PAM) may prevent violations from occurring or enable their identification at an early stage. In U.S.-initiated human subjects research taking place in resource-constrained countries with limited development of research regulatory structures, arranging a site (...)
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  12. Colin Allen (2002). A Skeptic's Progress. Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):695-702.
    Seven chimpanzees in twenty-seven experiments run over the course of five years at his University of Louisiana laboratory in New Iberia, Louisiana, are at the heart of Daniel Povinelli’s case that chimpanzee thinking about the physical world is not at all like that of humans. Chimps, according to Povinelli and his coauthors James Reaux, Laura Theall, and Steve Giambrone, are phenomenally quick at learning to associate visible features of tools with specific uses of those tools, but they appear to lack (...)
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  13. Robert F. Allen (2005). Free Will and Indeterminism: Robert Kane's Libertarianism. Journal of Philosophical Research 30:341-355.
    Drawing on Aristotle’s notion of “ultimate responsibility,” Robert Kane argues that to be exercising a free will an agent must have taken some character forming decisions for which there were no sufficient conditions or decisive reasons.1 That is, an agent whose will is free not only had the ability to develop other dispositions, but could have exercised that ability without being irrational. To say it again, a person has a free will just in case her character is the product (...)
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  14.  62
    Joscha Kärtner & Heidi Keller (2012). Comment: Culture-Specific Developmental Pathways to Prosocial Behavior: A Comment on Bischof-Köhler's Universalist Perspective. Emotion Review 4 (1):49-50.
    In her work, Doris Bischof-Köhler describes how empathically motivated prosocial behavior emerges during the second year of life. From a cross-cultural perspective we argue that this developmental pathway is prototypical for autonomy-oriented sociocultural contexts. Bischof-Köhler’s theory should be complemented by a theory of situational helping behavior based on shared intentional relations to provide an alternative developmental pathway for understanding toddlers’ prosocial behavior. Because this developmental pathway does not presuppose an understanding of self and others as autonomous intentional agents, it may (...)
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  15. Amy Allen (2005). Dependency, Subordination, and Recognition: On Judith Butler's Theory of Subjection. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 38 (3-4):199-222.
    Judith Butler's recent work expands the Foucaultian notion of subjection to encompass an analysis of the ways in which subordinated individuals becomes passionately attached to, and thus come to be psychically invested in, their own subordination. I argue that Butler's psychoanalytically grounded account of subjection offers a compelling diagnosis of how and why an attachment to oppressive norms – of femininity, for example – can persist in the face of rational critique of those norms. However, I also argue that her (...)
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  16.  20
    Paul Allen (2012). McMullin's Augustinian Settlement. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 86 (2):331-342.
    In developing his trademark use of “consonance” to prescribe a relationship between Christian faith and the natural sciences, Ernan McMullin drew on severaldistinctly Augustinian philosophical and theological themes during his fifty years of scholarship. Particularly prominent in McMullin’s work were an emphasis placed on Augustine’s biblical hermeneutic, which prioritized both literal and non-literal interpretive techniques, and Augustine’s epistemology of divine illumination. This paper examines several elements as part of an expository account of McMullin’s contribution toward the consonance between Christian faith (...)
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  17.  34
    Douglas Allen (2008). Mircea Eliade's Challenge to Contemporary Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:33-40.
    Mircea Eliade, often described by scholars and in the popular press as the world's most influential scholar of religion, symbolism, and myth, was trained as a philosopher, received his Ph.D. in philosophy, and taught in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Bucharest in the 1930s. Although he became a historian and phenomenologist of religion within the field of religious studies, his approach, methodology, and analysis are informed by philosophical assumptions and philosophical normative judgments. In several of his writings, (...)
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  18.  95
    Sophie R. Allen (2010). Can Theoretical Underdetermination Support the Indeterminacy of Translation? Revisiting Quine's 'Real Ground'. Philosophy 85 (1):67-90.
    It is commonly believed that Quine's principal argument for the Indeterminacy of Translation requires an untenably strong account of the underdetermination of theories by evidence, namely that that two theories may be compatible with all possible evidence for them and yet incompatible with each other. In this article, I argue that Quine's conclusion that translation is indeterminate can be based upon the weaker, uncontroversial conception of theoretical underdetermination, in conjunction with a weak reading of the 'Gavagai' argument which establishes the (...)
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  19.  40
    Pierre Keller & David Weberman (1998). Heidegger and the Source(s) of Intelligibility. Continental Philosophy Review 31 (4):369-386.
    Wittgensteinian readings of Being and Time, and of the source of the intelligibility of Dasein''s world, in terms of language and the average everyday public practices of das Man are partly right and partly wrong. They are right in correcting overly individualist and existentialist readings of Heidegger. But they are wrong in making Heidegger into a proponent of language or everydayness as the final word on intelligibility and the way the world is disclosed to us. The everydayness of das Man (...)
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  20. Douglas Allen, Judith M. Brown, Richard Falk, Michael Nagler, Makarand Paranjape, Glenn Paige, Bhikhu Parekh, Anthony J. Parel, Lloyd I. Rudolph, Michael Sonnleitner & Ronald J. Terchek (2005). Gandhi's Experiments with Truth: Essential Writings by and About Mahatma Gandhi. Lexington Books.
    This comprehensive Gandhi reader provides an essential new reference for scholars and students of his life and thought. It is the only text available that presents Gandhi's own writings, including excerpts from three of his books—An Autobiography: The Story of My Experiments with Truth, Satyagraha in South Africa, Hind Swaraj —a major pamphlet, Constructive Programme: Its Meaning and Place, and many journal articles and letters, along with a biographical sketch of his life in historical context and recent essays by highly (...)
     
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  21.  36
    Simon Keller (2000). An Interpretation of Plato's Cratylus. Phronesis 45 (4):284-305.
    Plato's main concern in the "Cratylus," I claim, is to argue against the idea that we can learn about things by examining their names, and in favour of the claim that philosophers should, so far as possible, look to the things themselves. Other philosophical questions, such as that of whether we should accept a naturalist or a conventionalist theory of namng, arise in the dialogue, but are subordinate. This reading of the "Cratylus," I say, explains certain puzzling facts about the (...)
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  22.  37
    Pierre Keller (1996). Heidegger's Critique of the Vulgar Notion of Time. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 4 (1):43 – 66.
    Abstract This paper compares Heidegger's conception of time with more prevalent physical and broadly psychological analyses of time. The ?vulgar? notion of time, as Heidegger understands it, is based on the assumption that time, regardless of whether it is identified with tense or not, is something that is essentially measurable by clocks. Heidegger maintains that the vulgar notion of time is a distortion of his own preferred conception of temporality. I show how temporality may be understood as the non?sequential tensed (...)
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  23.  23
    Chad Allen (1996). Smith's The Felt Meanings of the World and the Pure Appreciation of Being Simpliciter. Journal of Philosophical Research 21:69-80.
    In The Felt Meanings of the World, Quentin Smith lays the groundwork for a metaphysical worldview that is meant to stand as an alternative to nihilism. Smith finds fault with nihilism inasmuch as it fails to account for the possibility that faculties other than reason, namely feelings or intuition, may be the source of important metaphysical insight. From this observation, Smith builds his “metaphysics of feeling,” which is not concemed with rational explanations of the world’s existence, but rather with the (...)
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  24.  11
    Ansgar Allen (2011). Michael Young's the Rise of the Meritocracy: A Philosophical Critique. British Journal of Educational Studies 59 (4):367 - 382.
    This paper examines Michael Young's 1958 dystopia, The Rise of the Meritocracy. In this book, the word 'meritocracy' was coined and used in a pejorative sense. Today, however, meritocracy represents a positive ideal against which we measure the justice of our institutions. This paper argues that, when read in the twenty-first century, Young's dystopia does little to dislodge the implicit appeal of a meritocratic society. It examines the principles of education and administrative justice upon which meritocracy is based, suggesting that (...)
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  25.  10
    David Allen (2011). The Music Teaching Artist's Bible: Becoming a Virtuoso Educator (Review). Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (3):118-120.
    Eric Booth has completed the curriculum for today’s classical music performers in The Music Teaching Artist’s Bible: Becoming a Virtuoso Educator (2009). This book could handily serve as the text for a class designed to help music performance majors learn about the items that are usually ignored within today’s skill-based music performance degrees offered in most American universities and conservatories. Booth makes the case that many classically trained performing musicians unknowingly do more harm than good for their audiences and careers. (...)
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  26. Steven Robert Allen, Chomsky's Other Revolution.
    It's often been said that Chomsky is to linguistics what Einstein is to physics. His 1957 treatise, Syntactic Structures, initiated the so-called Chomskyan Revolution; in that book, Chomsky proposed a new linguistic theory which defined language as an innate human faculty hard-wired into our brains. Consequently, in Chomsky's view, there is a kind of "universal grammar" underlying all languages. Imagine that an alien came to Earth and observed the way we humans communicate with each other. According to Chomsky, this alien (...)
     
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  27.  13
    Diogenes Allen (1984). The Witness of Nature to God's Existence and Goodness. Faith and Philosophy 1 (1):27-43.
    I wish to show how the existence and order of nature may function as a witness to God’s existence and goodness. Although “witness” is a theological term, the argument is a philosophical one.
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  28.  14
    Graham Allen (2011). The Gift and the Return: Deconstructing Mary Shelley's Lodore. Derrida Today 4 (1):44-58.
    This paper begins with Barbara Johnson's examination of the erasure of sexual difference within the Yale school, and in particular her comments upon the work of Mary Shelley. Taking up hints in her statements about the relation between Mary Shelley's work and deconstruction, I suggest a reading of Mary Shelley's penultimate novel, Lodore, in relation to Derrida's Given Time. Lodore, which traditionally appeared a rather conservative novel to Mary Shelley's critics, has a number of parallels in its plot to the (...)
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  29.  4
    Barbara Ann Hocking, Scott Guy & Jason Grant Allen (2010). Three Sorries and You're In? Does the Prime Minister's Statement in the Australian Federal Parliament Presage Federal Constitutional Recognition and Reparations? Human Rights Review 11 (1):105-134.
    Then newly elected Labor Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd, made a historic statement of “Sorry” for past injustices to Australian Indigenous peoples at the opening of the 2008 federal parliament. In the long-standing absence of a constitutional ‘foundational principle’ to shape positive federal initiatives in this context, there has been speculation that the emphatic Sorry Statement may presage formal constitutional recognition. The debate is long overdue in a nation that only overturned the legal fiction of terra nullius and recognised native title (...)
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  30. Robert F. Allen, Free Will and Evaluation: Remarks on Noel Hendrickson's "Free Will Nihilism and the Question of Method".
    Noel Hendrickson believes that free will is separable from the “evaluative intuitions” with which it has been traditionally associated. But what are these intuitions? Answer: principles such as PAP, Β, and UR (6). The thesis that free will is separable from these principles, however, is hardly unique, as they are also eschewed by compatibilists who are unwilling to abdicate altogether evaluative intuitions. We are told in addition that there are “metaphysical senses” of free will that are not “relevant to responsibility” (...)
     
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  31.  1
    Christopher Allen (2008). Caravaggio's Complexion: The Humoral Characterization of Artists in the Early Modern Period∗. Intellectual History Review 18 (1):61-74.
    (2008). Caravaggio’s Complexion: The Humoral Characterization of Artists in the Early Modern Period∗. Intellectual History Review: Vol. 18, Humanism and Medicine in the Early Modern Era, pp. 61-74.
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  32.  2
    Jamie Allen (2011). Out of Sight, Out of Mind. On Guy Schofield's "Sleepers". Continent 1 (1):26.
    continent. 1.1 (2011):26. As perhaps all things do, digital graphics provide ground for our clambering attempts to interrelate the ideal and the real. Computational “3D models” don’t actually model any thing. They are assumed imitative, but in contemporary production, these are vectorized thought- objects, prototypes of notions and design ideals. The photographic image on the other hand, as a pipeline of indexical pixels, is the apogee of our attempts to describe and represent the world outside. 65,536 levels of red, green (...)
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  33.  1
    T. W. Allen (1909). Agar's Homerica. Classical Quarterly 3 (03):223-.
    Mr. Agar has collected his adversaria on the Odyssey which have been enjoying cold storage these many years in the blue depths of the Journal of Philology, and increased them by about three-quarters. He has produced a very interesting and valuable book, the most important contribution to the linguistic history of the Homeric text that has been made for a long time. Mr. Agar holds that the language of Homer represents the original ‘Achaean’ speech, and that its abnormalities in vocabulary, (...)
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  34. Robert Allen (2003). St. Augustine’s Free Will Theodicy and Natural Evil. Ars Disputandi 3.
    The problem of evil is an obstacle to justified belief in an omnipotent, omniscient, and omnibenevolent God . According to Saint Augustine’s free will theodicy , moral evil attends free will. Might something like AFWT also be used to account for natural evil? After all, it is possible that calamities such as famines, earthquakes, and floods are the effects of the sinful willing of certain persons, viz., ‘fallen angels.’ Working to destroy our faith, Satan and his cohorts could be responsible (...)
     
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  35. R. E. Allen (ed.) (2012). Studies in Plato's Metaphysics. Routledge.
    Did Plato abandon, or sharply modify, the Theory of Forms in later life? In the Phaedo, Symposium, and Republic it is generally agreed that Plato held that universals exist. But in Parmenides, he subjected that theory to criticism. If the criticism were valid, and Plato knew so, then the Parmenides marks a turning point in his thought. If, however, Plato became aware that there are radical differences in the logical behaviour of concepts, and the later dialogues are a record of (...)
     
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  36. R. E. Allen (ed.) (2014). Studies in Plato's Metaphysics. Routledge.
    Did Plato abandon, or sharply modify, the Theory of Forms in later life? In the _Phaedo, Symposium, _and _Republic_ it is generally agreed that Plato held that universals exist. But in Parmenides, he subjected that theory to criticism. If the criticism were valid, and Plato knew so, then the _Parmenides_ marks a turning point in his thought. If, however, Plato became aware that there are radical differences in the logical behaviour of concepts, and the later dialogues are a record of (...)
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  37. A. Allen (1975). The Moon's Horses. Classical Quarterly 25 (01):153-.
    So far as I know, the manuscripts' fraternis in Prop. 2. 34. 52 ‘aut cur fraternis Luna laboret equis’ has never been doubted. I offer an emendation of it in this note. Luna laboret ought to allude to lunar eclipse, but you cannot see it through the fog of fraternis equis. In C.Q.xliii , 26–7, Shackleton Bailey dealt with the traditional claim for it, that the moon is eclipsed, not by the sun, by the presence of her brother's horses, but (...)
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  38. Pierre Keller (1991). The Numerical Identity of the Self and its Objects in Kant's Transcendental Idealism. Dissertation, Columbia University
    Kant's philosophy must be understood nonnaturalistically and anti-psychologistically. Self-consciousness must be interpreted as preceding the distinction between different persons. Kant departs from the traditional idea that I thoughts are always mediated by a certain specific I sense or conceptualization of oneself. At the same time the so-called paradoxes of self-consciousness are resolved. The possibility of a pre-personal self-consciousness is what links the way all objects are given to finite beings to the way they are conceptualized by those beings. It serves (...)
     
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  39.  19
    Evelyn Fox Keller (1996). Reflections on Gender and Science. Yale University Press.
    "-Barbara Ehrenreich, Mother Jones "This book represents the expression of a particular feminist perspective made all the more compelling by Keller's evident commitment to and understanding of science.
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  40. Sarah Allen (2007). Loving the Good Beyond Being: The Paradoxical Sense of Levinas's “Return” to Platonism. Studia Phaenomenologica 7 (1):75-107.
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  41. Colin Allen, Marc Bekoff & George V. Lauder (eds.) (1998). Nature's Purposes: Analyses of Function and Design in Biology. The MIT Press.
  42. Colin Allen (2010). Mirror, Mirror in the Brain, What's the Monkey Stand to Gain? Noûs 44 (2):372 - 391.
    Primatologists generally agree that monkeys lack higher-order intentional capacities related to theory of mind. Yet the discovery of the so-called "mirror neurons" in monkeys suggests to many neuroscientists that they have the rudiments of intentional understanding. Given a standard philosophical view about intentional understanding, which requires higher-order intentionahty, a paradox arises. Different ways of resolving the paradox are assessed, using evidence from neural, cognitive, and behavioral studies of humans and monkeys. A decisive resolution to the paradox requires substantial additional empirical (...)
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  43.  3
    Shanley Allen, Aslı Özyürek, Sotaro Kita, Amanda Brown, Reyhan Furman, Tomoko Ishizuka & Mihoko Fujii (2007). Language-Specific and Universal Influences in Children’s Syntactic Packaging of Manner and Path: A Comparison of English, Japanese, and Turkish. Cognition 102 (1):16-48.
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  44. Sophie R. Allen (2007). What's the Point in Scientific Realism If We Don't Know What's Really There? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 82 (61):97-123.
    The aim of this paper will be to show that certain strongly realist forms of scientific realism are either misguided or misnamed. I will argue that, in the case of a range of robustly realist formulations of scientific realism, the ‘scientific’ and the ‘realism’ are in significant philosophical and methodological conflict with each other; in particular, that there is a tension between the actual subject matter and methods of science on the one hand, and the realists' metaphysical claims about which (...)
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  45. Jeffner Allen (1978). Husserl's Communal Spirit: A Phenomenological Study of the Fundamental Structure of Society. Philosophy and Social Criticism 5 (1):68-82.
  46.  6
    Vera Keller (2012). Accounting for Invention: Guido Pancirolli's Lost and Found Things and the Development of Desiderata. Journal of the History of Ideas 73 (2):223-245.
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  47.  10
    Michael W. Allen (1997). Relativism and James's Pragmatic Notion of Truth. Southwest Philosophy Review 13 (1):103-111.
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  48.  70
    R. E. Allen (1960). Participation and Predication in Plato's Middle Dialogues. Philosophical Review 69 (2):147-164.
  49.  54
    R. E. Allen (1959). Anamnesis in Plato's "Meno and Phaedo". Review of Metaphysics 13 (1):165 - 174.
  50.  59
    R. E. Allen (1972). Law and Justice in Plato's Crito. Journal of Philosophy 64 (18):557-567.
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