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Profile: Allen Wood (Stanford University, Indiana University)
Profile: Allen Wood (Indiana University, Bloomington)
  1. Allen Wood, Keynote Address to the Conference on Dignity and Law, Cape Town University Law School, July, 2007.
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  2. Allen W. Wood, Fichte: From Nature to Freedom (System of Ethics §§ 9-13:).
    Allen W.Wood Stanford University Fichte’s overall aim in the Second Chapter of the System of Ethics is to derive the applicability of the moral principle he has deduced in the First Chapter. That principle was: To determine one’s freedom solely in accordance with the concept of selfdetermination (SW IV:59).1 To show that this principle can be applied is to derive its application from the conditions of free agency in which we find ourselves. In the section of the Second Chapter (...)
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  3. Allen Wood, Autonomy as the Ground of Morality.
    Those of us who are sympathetic to Kantian ethics usually are so because we regard it as an ethics of autonomy, based on rational self-esteem and respect for the human capacity to direct one’s own life according to rational principles. Kantian ethical theory is grounded on the idea that the moral law is binding on me only because it is a law proceeding from my own will. The ground of a law of autonomy lies in the very will which is (...)
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  4. Allen Wood, Hegel on Education.
    Hegel spent most of his life as an educator. Between 1794 and 1800, he was a private tutor, first in Bern, Switzerland, and then in Frankfurt-am-Main. He then began a university career at the University of Jena, which in 1806 was interrupted by the Napoleonic conquest of Prussia, and did not resume for ten years. In the intervening years, he was director of a Gymnasium (or secondary school) in Nuremberg. In 1816, Hegel was appointed professor of philosophy at the University (...)
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  5. Allen Wood, Kant and the Problem of Human Nature.
    Allen Wood “What is the human being?” Kant sometimes treated this question as the most fundamental question of all philosophy: “The field of philosophy in the cosmopolitan sense can be brought down to the following questions: 1. What can I know? 1. What ought I to do? 1. What may I hope? 1. What is the human being? Metaphysics answers the first question, morals the second, religion the third, and anthropology the fourth. Fundamentally, however, we could reckon all of this (...)
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  6. Allen Wood, Kant's History of Ethics.
    Kant was not a very knowledgeable historian of philosophy. He came to the study of philosophy from natural science, and later the fields of ethics, aesthetics, politics and religion came to occupy his central concerns, but his approach to philosophical issues never came by way of reflection on their history. He was well acquainted, of course, with the recent tradition of German philosophy: Leibniz, Wolff, Baumgarten and Crusius, and he seems also to have had knowledge of eighteenth century French philosophy, (...)
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  7. Allen Wood, Kant Vs. Eudaimonism.
    Kant was among the first[i] to break decisively with the eudaimonistic tradition of classical ethics by declaring that the moral principle is entirely distinct and divergent from the principle of happiness (G 4:393, KpV 5:21-27).[ii] I am going to argue that what is at issue in Kant’s rejection of eudaimonism is not fundamentally any question of ethical value or the priority among values. On the contrary, on these matters Kant shares the views which led classical ethical theory from Socrates onward (...)
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  8. Allen Wood, The 'I' as Principle of Practical Philosophy.
    Fichte founded a revolutionary philosophical movement and invented an entirely new kind of philosophy; and he did so knowingly and intentionally. Yet, paradoxically, he did all this merely in the course of attempting to complete the philosophical project of Kant and protect critical philosophy against the possibility of skeptical..
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  9. Allen W. Wood (2014). The Free Development of Each: Studies on Freedom, Right, and Ethics in Classical German Philosophy. Oup Oxford.
    The Free Development of Each collects twelve essays on the history of German philosophy by Allen W. Wood, one of the leading scholars in the field. They explore moral philosophy, politics, society, and history in the works of Kant, Herder, Fichte, Hegel, and Marx, and share the basic theme of freedom, as it appears in morality and in politics.
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  10. Allen Wood (2011). Kant and the Right to Lie. Reviewed Essay: On a Supposed Right to Lie From Philanthropy, by Inmanuel Kant (1797). Eidos 15:96-117.
    Kant’s strict views on lying have been regularly cited as a reason for thinking there is something fundamentally wrong with Kantian ethics. Some of Kant’s statements here seem so excessive that most Kantians who have dealt with the topic have tried to distance themselves from them, usually claiming that they do not (or need not) follow from Kant’s own principles. In this chapter, I will do a little of that, partly by questioning whether the famous example of the “murderer at (...)
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  11. Allen W. Wood & Songsuk Susan Hahn (eds.) (2011). Cambridge History of Philosophy in the 19th Century (1790-1870). Cambridge University Press.
    The latest volume in the Cambridge Histories of Philosophy series, The Cambridge History of Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century brings together twenty-nine leading experts in the field and covers the years 1790-1870. Their twenty-seven chapters provide a comprehensive survey of the period, organizing the material topically. After a brief editor's introduction, it begins with three chapters surveying the background of nineteenth century philosophy: followed by two on logic and mathematics, two on nature and natural science, five on mind and language, (...)
     
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  12. Allen W. Wood & Songsuk Susan Hahn (eds.) (2011). The Cambridge History of Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century (1790-1870). Cambridge University Press.
    The latest volume in the Cambridge Histories of Philosophy series, The Cambridge History of Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century brings together twenty-nine leading experts in the field and covers the years 1790-1870. Their twenty-seven chapters provide a comprehensive survey of the period, organizing the material topically. After a brief editor's introduction, it begins with three chapters surveying the background of nineteenth century philosophy: followed by two on logic and mathematics, two on nature and natural science, five on mind and language, (...)
     
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  13. Allen Wood (2010). Recognition, Respect. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.
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  14. Allen W. Wood (2010). geRman idealism. In Dean Moyar (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Nineteenth Century Philosophy. Routledge. 104.
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  15. Allen W. Wood (2010). Hegel on Responsibility for Actions and Consequences. In Arto Laitinen & Constantine Sandis (eds.), Hegel on Action. Palgrave Macmillan.
  16. Allen W. Wood (2010). Kant and the Intelligibility of Evil. In Sharon Anderson-Gold & Pablo Muchnik (eds.), Kant's Anatomy of Evil. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  17. Allen W. Wood (2010). Punishment, Retribution, and the Coercive Enforcement of Right. In Lara Denis (ed.), Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
  18. Allen W. Wood (2010). The Antinomies of Pure Reason. In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Cambridge University Press.
  19. Allen Wood (2009). Duties to Oneself, Duties of Respect to Others. In Thomas E. Hill (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Kant's Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    One of the principal aims of Kant’s Metaphysics of Morals, especially of the Doctrine of Virtue, is to present a taxonomy of our duties as human beings. The basic division of duties is between juridical duties and ethical duties, which determines the division of the Metaphysics of Morals into the Doctrine of Right and the Doctrine of Virtue. Juridical duties are duties that may be coercively enforced from outside the agent, as by the civil or criminal laws, or other social (...)
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  20. Allen Wood (2009). Herder and Kant on History: Their Enlightenment Faith. In Samuel Newlands & Larry M. Jorgensen (eds.), Metaphysics and the Good: Themes From the Philosophy of Robert Merrihew Adams. Oxford University Press.
     
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  21. Allen Wood (2009). Review of Arthur Ripstein, Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (11).
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  22. Allen Wood (2008). The Duty to Believe According to the Evidence. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 63 (1/3):7 - 24.
    'Evidentialism' is the conventional name (given mainly by its opponents) for the view that there is a moral duty to proportion one's beliefs to evidence, proof or other epistemic justifications for belief. This essay defends evidentialism against objections based on the alleged involuntariness of belief, on the claim that evidentialism assumes a doubtful epistemology, that epistemically unsupported beliefs can be beneficial, that there are significant classes of exceptions to the evidentialist principle, and other shabby evasions and alibis (as I take (...)
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  23. Allen W. Wood (2008). Kantian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, Allen Wood investigates Kant's conception of ethical theory, using it to develop a viable approach to the rights and moral duties of human beings. By remaining closer to Kant's own view of the aims of ethics, Wood's understanding of Kantian ethics differs from the received "constructivist" interpretation, especially on such matters as the ground and function of ethical principles, the nature of ethical reasoning and autonomy as the ground of ethics.
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  24. Allen W. Wood (2007). Comments on Guyer. Inquiry 50 (5):465 – 479.
    Paul Guyer's paper "Naturalistic and Transcendental Moments in Kant's Moral Philosophy" raises a set of issues about how Kantian ethics should be understood in relation to present day "philosophical naturalism" that are very much in need of discussion. The paper itself is challenging, even in some respects iconoclastic, and provides a highly welcome provocation to raise in new ways some basic questions about what Kantian ethics is and what it ought to be. Guyer offers us an admirably informed and complex (...)
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  25. Allen Wood, Paul Guyer & Henry E. Allison (2007). Debating Allison on Transcendental Idealism. Kantian Review 12 (2):1-39.
  26. Allen Wood (2006). Philosophy—What is to Be Done? Topoi 25 (1-2):133-136.
    Philosophical thinking, in the historically original sense, is simply the human mind in operation, unaided by anything supernatural and unfettered by any human authority or any procedure for reaching some pre-given end. This means that “philosophy” originally included far more than it does now, including all the natural sciences, as well as rational reflection on society, history, and art. What this means for us now is that philosophy must be an essentially outward-facing discipline, open to others. Most importantly, it needs (...)
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  27. Allen W. Wood (2006). Fichte's Intersubjective I. Inquiry 49 (1):62 – 79.
    The challenge to philosophy of mind for the past two hundred years has been to overcome the Cartesian conception of mind. This essay explores the attempt to do this by J. G. Fichte, especially regarding intersubjectivity or the knowledge of other minds. Fichte provides a transcendental deduction of the concept of the other I, as a condition for experiencing the individuality of our own I. The basis of this argument is the concept of the "summons", which Fichte argues is necessary (...)
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  28. Allen W. Wood (2006). The Supreme Principle of Morality. In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant and Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 342--80.
  29. Allen W. Wood (2005). Kant. Blackwell Pub..
  30. Allen W. Wood (2004/1999). Karl Marx. Routledge.
    Since its first publication in 1981, Karl Marx has become one of the most respected books on Marx's philosophical thought. Allen Wood explains Marx's views from a philosophical standpoint and defends Marx against common misunderstandings and criticisms of his views. All the major philosophical topics in Marx's work are considered: alienation, historical materialism, morality, philosophical materialism, and the dialectical method. The second edition has been revised to include a new chapter on capitalist exploitation and new suggestions for further reading. Wood (...)
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  31. Allen W. Wood (2004). ¿ Qué es el idealismo transcendental? Endoxa: Series Filosóficas 18:27-44.
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  32. Allen Wood (2003). The Good Will. Philosophical Topics 31 (1/2):457-484.
    Kant begins the First Section of the Groundwork with a statement that is one of the most memorable in all his writings: “There is nothing it is possible to think of anywhere in the world, or indeed anything at all outside it, that can be held to be good without limitation, excepting only a good will” (Ak 4:393).[i] Due to the textual prominence of this claim, readers of the Groundwork have usually proceeded to read that work, and Kant’s other ethical (...)
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  33. Allen W. Wood (2003). Allison, Henry E. Kant's Theory of Taste: A Reading of the Critique of Aesthetic Judgment. Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):633-635.
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  34. Allen W. Wood (2003). Kantianism, Moral Worth and Human Welfare. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 53 (213):587–595.
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  35. Allen W. Wood (2003). Review: Kantianism, Moral Worth and Human Welfare. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 53 (213):587 - 595.
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  36. Hannah Arendt, Herbert Marcuse, Michel Foucault, Mark Ourent, Gregory Pence, Robert Nozick, David Schweickart, Allen Wood, Gary Dymski, John Rawls, Richard Arneson, G. A. Cohen, Ann Ferguson, Gregory Kavka, Mary Hawkesworth, Jon Elster, Phillipe van Parijs, Andrew Levine & John Roemer (2001). Philosophy and the Problems of Work: A Reader. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  37. Allen W. Wood (2001). Thought, Estados Unidos, Cambridge University Press, 1999, 436 P. Signos Filosóficos 5:233-263.
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  38. Allen Wood (2000). Religion, Ethical Community and the Struggle Against Evil. Faith and Philosophy 17 (4):498-511.
    This paper deals with the motivation behind Kant’s conception of “religion” as “the recognition of all our duties as divine commands”. It argues that in order to understand this motivation, we must grasp Kant’s conception of radical evil as social in origin, and the response to it as equally social - the creation of a voluntary, universal “ethical community”. Kant's historical model for this community is a religious community (especially the Christian church), though Kant regards traditional churches or religious communities (...)
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  39. Allen W. Wood (2000). Kant's Practical Philosophy. In Karl Ameriks (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to German Idealism. Cambridge University Press. 57--75.
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  40. Allen Wood (1999). Marx. In Ted Honderich (ed.), The Philosophers: Introducing Great Western Thinkers. Oup Oxford.
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  41. Allen W. Wood (1999). Kant's Ethical Thought. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a major new study of Kant's ethics that will transform the way students and scholars approach the subject in future. Allen Wood argues that Kant's ethical vision is grounded in the idea of the dignity of the rational nature of every human being. Undergoing both natural competitiveness and social antagonism the human species, according to Kant, develops the rational capacity to struggle against its impulses towards a human community in which the ends of all are to harmonize and (...)
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  42. Harry Allison, Karl Ameriks, Lewis White Beck, Lorne Falkenstein, Paul Guyer, Philip Kitcher, Charles Parsons, P. F. Strawson & Allen W. Wood (1998). Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: Critical Essays. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  43. Allen Wood (1998). Kant on Duties Regarding Nonrational Nature. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72:189 - 228.
    [Allen W. Wood] Kant's moral philosophy is grounded on the dignity of humanity as its sole fundamental value, and involves the claim that human beings are to be regarded as the ultimate end of nature. It might be thought that a theory of this kind would be incapable of grounding any conception of our relation to other living things or to the natural world which would value nonhuman creatures or respect humanity's natural environment. This paper criticizes Kant's argumentative strategy for (...)
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  44. Allen Wood (1998). Review of Creating the Kingdom of Ends. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 107:607-611.
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  45. Allen Wood (1998). The Final Form of Kant's Practical Philosophy. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (S1):1-20.
    (Ak 10:74).[1] During the so-called ‘silent decade’ of the 1770s, when Kant was working on the Critique of Pure Reason, he promised repeatedly not only that he would soon finish that work but also that he would soon publish a “metaphysics of morals” (Ak 10:97, 132, 144).[2] Yet it was not until four years after the first Critique that Kant finally wrote a work on ethics, and even then he merely laid the ground for a metaphysics of morals by identifying (...)
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  46. Allen W. Wood (1998). Creating the Kingdom of Ends. Philosophical Review 107 (4):607-611.
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  47. Allen W. Wood (1998). Kant on Duties Regarding Nonrational Nature: Allen W. Wood. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):189–210.
    [Allen W. Wood] Kant's moral philosophy is grounded on the dignity of humanity as its sole fundamental value, and involves the claim that human beings are to be regarded as the ultimate end of nature. It might be thought that a theory of this kind would be incapable of grounding any conception of our relation to other living things or to the natural world which would value nonhuman creatures or respect humanity's natural environment. This paper criticizes Kant's argumentative strategy for (...)
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  48. Allen W. Wood (1997). Idealism and Freedom. Philosophical Review 106 (4):601-604.
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  49. William S. Snyder, Jack Zupko & Allen W. Wood (1995). Mary J. Gregor 1928-1994. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 68 (5):96 - 98.
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  50. Allen W. Wood (1995). Attacking Morality: A Metaethical Project. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 25 (sup1):221-249.
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