Search results for 'Allison McIntyre' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Allison McIntyre (2004). The Double Life of Double Effect. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (1):61-74.score: 240.0
    The U.S. Supreme Court's majorityopinion in Vacco v. Quill assumes thatthe principle of double effect explains thepermissibility of hastening death in thecontext of ordinary palliative care and inextraordinary cases in which painkilling drugshave failed to relieve especially intractablesuffering and terminal sedation has beenadopted as a last resort. The traditionaldoctrine of double effect, understood asproviding a prohibition on instrumental harmingas opposed to incidental harming or harming asa side effect, must be distinguished from otherways in which the claim that a result is (...)
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  2. Allen Wood, Paul Guyer & Henry E. Allison (2007). Debating Allison on Transcendental Idealism. Kantian Review 12 (2):1-39.score: 180.0
  3. H. Allison, A. Aspect, P. Grangier, G. Roger & S. Auyang (2009). Abraham, R. And Marsden, J.(1978), Foundations of Mechanics, New York/Reading, MA: Benjamin Cummings. Allison, H.(1994),“Causality and Causal Laws in Kant. A Critique of Michael Friedman”, In: P. Parrini (Ed.), Kant and Contemporary Epistemology, Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer. [REVIEW] In P. Kerszberg, J. Petitot & M. Bitbol (eds.), Constituting Objectivity. Transcendental Perspectives on Modern Physics. 515.score: 180.0
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  4. Paul Guyer & Henry E. Allison (2006). Dialogue: Paul Guyer and Henry Allison on Allison's Kant's Theory of Taste. In Rebecca Kukla (ed.), Aesthetics and Cognition in Kant's Critical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 180.0
  5. Alison McIntyre (2006). What is Wrong with Weakness of Will? Journal of Philosophy 103 (6):284-311.score: 60.0
    What is wrong with weakness of will? Alison MCINTYRE The Journal of philosophy 103:66, 284-311, Journal of Philosophy, 2006. Faiblesse; Volont{\'e}; Will; Philosophie morale; Moral philosophy.
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  6. Henry E. Allison (1990). Kant's Theory of Freedom. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In his new book the eminent Kant scholar Henry Allison provides an innovative and comprehensive interpretation of Kant's concept of freedom. The author analyzes the concept and discusses the role it plays in Kant's moral philosophy and psychology. He also considers in full detail the critical literature on the subject from Kant's own time to the present day. In the first part Professor Allison argues that at the center of the Critique of Pure Reason there is the foundation (...)
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  7. Henry E. Allison (2001). Kant's Theory of Taste: A Reading of the Critique of Aesthetic Judgment. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    This book constitutes one of the most important contributions to recent Kant scholarship. In it, one of the pre-eminent interpreters of Kant, Henry Allison, offers a comprehensive, systematic, and philosophically astute account of all aspects of Kant's views on aesthetics. The first part of the book analyses Kant's conception of reflective judgment and its connections with both empirical knowledge and judgments of taste. The second and third parts treat two questions that Allison insists must be kept distinct: the (...)
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  8. Henry E. Allison (1996). Idealism and Freedom: Essays on Kant's Theoretical and Practical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Henry Allison is one of the foremost interpreters of the philosophy of Kant. This new volume collects all his recent essays on Kant's theoretical and practical philosophy. All the essays postdate Allison's two major books on Kant (Kant's Transcendental Idealism, 1983, and Kant's Theory of Freedom, 1990), and together they constitute an attempt to respond to critics and to clarify, develop and apply some of the central theses of those books. Two are published here for the first time. (...)
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  9. Henry E. Allison (2011). Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals: A Commentary. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    Henry E. Allison presents a comprehensive commentary on Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals (1785). It differs from most recent commentaries in paying special attention to the structure of the work, the historical context in which it was written, and the views to which Kant was responding. Allison argues that, despite its relative brevity, the Groundwork is the single most important work in modern moral philosophy and that its significance lies mainly in two closely related factors. The (...)
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  10. Marianne Allison (1986). A Literature Review of Approaches to the Professionalism of Journalists. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 1 (2):5 – 19.score: 60.0
    This literature review of professionalism was prepared by San Jose State University graduate student Marianne Allison as a research committee project of the Mass Communication and Society Division, Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. The project was prepared under the guidance of Professor Diana Stover Tillinghast. It reviews the literature on two approaches to professionalism in general and of the professionalism of journalists in particular: the ?structural?functionalist approach?; and the ?power approach.?; Traditional and recent discussions of the (...)
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  11. Lyn Allison & Leslie Cannold (2012). Previous AHOYs in Support of Ron. Australian Humanist, The (107):3.score: 60.0
    Allison, Lyn; Cannold, Leslie It is great to see such a good turnout for this important occasion and I congratulate the Humanist Society again on this award. It really makes a difference to people's lives: when they get the award, when they know about it, when there is publicity for the person concerned. It is an all-round good thing to do and I congratulate you for it.
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  12. Henry E. Allison (2012). Essays on Kant. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This volume presents seventeen essays by one of the world's leading scholars on Kant. Henry E. Allison explores the nature of transcendental idealism, freedom of the will, and the concept of the purposiveness of nature. He places Kant's views in their historical context and explores their contemporary relevance to present day philosophers.
     
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  13. Henry E. Allison (2006). Transcendental Realism, Empirical Realism and Transcendental Idealism. Kantian Review 11 (1):1-28.score: 30.0
    This essay argues that the key to understanding Kant's transcendental idealism is to understand the transcendental realism with which he contrasts it. It maintains that the latter is not to be identified with a particular metaphysical thesis, but with the assumption that the proper objects of human cognitions are “objects in general” or “as such,” that is, objects considered simply qua objects of some understanding. Since this appears to conflict with Kant's own characterization of transcendental realism as the view that (...)
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  14. Alison McIntyre (2001). Doing Away with Double Effect. Ethics 111 (2):219-255.score: 30.0
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  15. Henry E. Allison (2000). Where Have All the Categories Gone? Reflections on Longuenesse's Reading of Kant's Transcendental Deduction. Inquiry 43 (1):67 – 80.score: 30.0
    This paper contains a critical analysis of the interpretation of Kant's second edition version of the Transcendental Deduction offered by Béatrice Longuenesse in her recent book: Kant and the Capacity to Judge. Though agreeing with much of Longuenesse's analysis of the logical function of judgment, I question the way in which she tends to assign them the objectifying role traditionally given to the categories. More particularly, by way of defending my own interpretation of the Deduction against some of her criticisms, (...)
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  16. Lee McIntyre (2007). Emergence and Reduction in Chemistry: Ontological or Epistemological Concepts? Synthese 155 (3):337-343.score: 30.0
    In this paper I argue that the ontological interpretation of the concepts of reduction and emergence is often misleading in the philosophy of science and should nearly always be eschewed in favor of an epistemological interpretation. As a paradigm case, an example is drawn from the philosophy of chemistry to illustrate the drawbacks of “ontological reduction” and “ontological emergence,” and the virtues of an epistemological interpretation of these concepts.
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  17. Henry E. Allison (1973). Kant's Critique of Berkeley. Journal of the History of Philosophy 11 (1).score: 30.0
  18. Henry E. Allison (1976). The Non-Spatiality of Things in Themselves for Kant. Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (3):313-321.score: 30.0
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  19. Henry E. Allison (2008). &Quot;whatever Begins to Exist Must Have a Cause of Existence&Quot;: Hume's Analysis and Kant's Response. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):525–546.score: 30.0
  20. Alison McIntyre, Doctrine of Double Effect. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
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  21. David B. Allison (1978). Derrida and Wittgenstein: Playing the Game. Research in Phenomenology 8 (1):93-109.score: 30.0
  22. Kenneth B. McIntyre (2008). Historicity as Methodology or Hermeneutics: Collingwood's Influence on Skinner and Gadamer. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (2):138-166.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I offer both a brief study of Collingwood's conception of historical explanation and epistemological historicity, and an examination of the influence of Collingwood's work on the historical methodology of Quentin Skinner and on Gadamer's hermeneutic philosophy. Collingwood's work on the philosophy of history manifests a tension between the realist implications of the doctrine of reenactment and the logic of question and answer on the one hand, and, on the other, the constructionist tendency of the rest of his (...)
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  23. Henry E. Allison (2007). Comments on Guyer. Inquiry 50 (5):480 – 488.score: 30.0
    Guyer argues for four major theses. First, in his early, pre-critical discussions of morality, Kant advocated a version of rational egoism, in which freedom, understood naturalistically as a freedom from domination by both one's own inclinations and from other people, rather than happiness, is the fundamental value. From this point of view, the function of the moral law is to prescribe rules best suited to the preservation and maximization of such freedom, just as on the traditional eudaemonistic account it is (...)
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  24. Henry E. Allison (1986). Morality and Freedom: Kant's Reciprocity Thesis. Philosophical Review 95 (3):393-425.score: 30.0
  25. Ronald McIntyre (2012). &Quot;we-Subjectivity&Quot;: Husserl on Community and Communal Constitution. In Christel Fricke & Dagfinn Føllesdal (eds.), Intersubjectivity and Objectivity in Adam Smith and Edmund Husserl. Ontos Verlag. 8--61.score: 30.0
    I experience the world as comprising not only pluralities of individual persons but also interpersonal communal unities – groups, teams, societies, cultures, etc. The world, as experienced or "constituted", is a social world, a “spiritual” world. How are these social communities experienced as communities and distinguished from one another? What does it mean to be a “community”? And how do I constitute myself as a member of some communities but not of others? Moreover, the world of experience is not constituted (...)
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  26. Henry E. Allison (1992). Kant's Antinomy of Teleological Judgment. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (S1):25-42.score: 30.0
  27. Henry E. Allison (2008). Custom and Reason in Hume: A Kantian Reading of the First Book of the Treatise. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    So considered, Hume is viewed as a naturalist, whose project in the first three parts of the first book of the Treatise is to provide an account of the ...
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  28. Henry E. Allison (2001). Ethics, Evil, and Anthropology in Kant: Remarks on Allen Wood's "Kant's Ethical Thought&Quot;. [REVIEW] Ethics 111 (3):594-613.score: 30.0
  29. Henry E. Allison (1993). Kant on Freedom: A Reply to My Critics. Inquiry 36 (4):443 – 464.score: 30.0
    The first two sections of this paper are devoted respectively to the criticisms of my views raised by Stephen Engstrom and Andrews Reath at a symposium on Kant's Theory of Freedom held in Washington D.C. on 28 December 1992 under the auspices of the North American Kant Society. The third section contains my response to the remarks of Marcia Baron at a second symposium in Chicago on 24 April 1993 at the APA Western Division meetings. The fourth section deals with (...)
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  30. Ronald McIntyre & David Woodruff Smith (1989). Theory of Intentionality. In William R. McKenna & J. N. Mohanty (eds.), Husserl's Phenomenology: A Textbook. University Press of America.score: 30.0
    §1. Intentionality; §2. Husserl's Phenomenological Conception of Intentionality; §3. The Distinction between Content and Object; §4. Husserl's Theory of Content: Noesis and Noema; §5. Noema and Object; §6. The Sensory Content of Perception; §7. The Internal Structure of Noematic Sinne; §8. Noema and Horizon; §9. Horizon and Background Beliefs.
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  31. Jane L. McIntyre (1989). Personal Identity and the Passions. Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (4):545-557.score: 30.0
  32. Henry E. Allison (1992). Spinoza and the Philosophy of Immanence: Reflections on Yovel's the Adventures of Immanence. Inquiry 35 (1):55 – 67.score: 30.0
    This essay examines the main line of argument of Yirmiyahu Yovel's The Adventures of Immanence. Expressing general agreement with Yovel's central thesis that Spinoza's ?immanent revolution? marked an important tuming?point in the history of modernity and profoundly influenced subsequent thought, I none the less take issue with some of the details of the story. In particular, I question his omission of Lessing, his account of the relationship between Spinoza and Kant, and his treatment of Marx. In a final section I (...)
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  33. Alison Mcintyre (1994). Guilty Bystanders? On the Legitimacy of Duty to Rescue Statutes. Philosophy and Public Affairs 23 (2):157–191.score: 30.0
  34. Henry E. Allison (2003). Reply to the Comments of Longuenesse and Ginsborg. Inquiry 46 (2):182 – 194.score: 30.0
    In this discussion I respond to some of the criticisms raised by Béatrice Longuenesse and Hannah Ginsborg to my account of Kant's aesthetic theory presents in Kant's Theory of Taste.
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  35. David B. Allison (ed.) (1977/1985). The New Nietzsche: Contemporary Styles of Interpretation. Mit Press.score: 30.0
    The fifteen essays, written by such eminent scholars as Derrida, Heidegger, Deleuze, Klossowski, and Blanchot, focus on the Nietzschean concepts of the Will to ...
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  36. Jane L. Mcintyre (2006). Strength of Mind: Prospects and Problems for a Humean Account. [REVIEW] Synthese 152 (3):393 - 401.score: 30.0
    References to strength of mind, a character trait implying “the prevalence of the calm passions above the violent”, occur in a number of important discussions of motivation in the Treatise and the Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals. Nevertheless, Hume says surprisingly little about what strength of mind is, or how it is achieved. This paper argues that Hume’s theory of the passions can provide an interesting and defensible account of strength of mind. The paper concludes with a brief comparison (...)
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  37. Henry E. Allison (2004). Kant's Transcendental Idealism. Yale University Press.score: 30.0
    This landmark book is now reissued in a new edition that has been vastly rewritten and updated to respond to recent Kantian literature.
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  38. Davis Baird, Eric R. Scerri & Lee C. McIntyre (eds.) (2006). Philosophy of Chemistry: Synthesis of a New Discipline. Springer.score: 30.0
    This comprehensive volume marks a new standard in scholarship in the still emerging field of the philosophy of chemistry. With selections drawn from a wide range of scholarly disciplines, philosophers, chemists, and historians of science here converge to ask some of the most fundamental questions about the relationship between philosophy and chemistry. What can chemistry teach us about longstanding disputes in the philosophy of science over such issues as reductionism, autonomy, and supervenience? And what new issues may chemistry bring to (...)
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  39. Henry E. Allison (1968). Kant's Concept of the Transcendental Object. Kant-Studien 59 (1-4):165-186.score: 30.0
  40. Ronald McIntyre (1999). Naturalizing Phenomenology? Dretske on Qualia. In Jean Petitot, Francisco Varela, Bernard Pachoud & Jean-Michel Roy (eds.), Naturalizing Phenomenology: Contemporary Phenomenology and Cognitive Science. Stanford University Press. 429--439.score: 30.0
    First, I briefly characterize Dretske’s particular naturalization project, emphasizing his naturalistic reconstruction of the notion of representation. Second, I note some apparent similarities between his notion of representation and Husserl’s notion of intentionality, but I find even more important differences. Whereas Husserl takes intentionality to be an intrinsic, phenomenological feature of thought and experience, Dretske advocates an “externalist” account of mental representation. Third, I consider Dretske’s treatment of qualia, because he takes it to show that his representational account of mind (...)
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  41. David Woodruff Smith & Ronald McIntyre (1971). Intentionality Via Intensions. Journal of Philosophy 68 (September):541-560.score: 30.0
  42. Alison McIntyre (1994). Compatibilists Could Have Done Otherwise: Responsibility and Negative Agency. Philosophical Review 103 (3):453-488.score: 30.0
  43. Mark Allison (2014). The Making of British Socialism by Mark Bevir, And: Karl Marx: A Nineteenth-Century Lifeby Jonathan Sperber (Review). Utopian Studies 25 (1):221-226.score: 30.0
    In the twenty-four years since the dismantling of the Berlin Wall, a body of high-quality scholarship on socialism has slowly accumulated. Here I discuss two superb additions to this incipient post–Cold War canon, Mark Bevir’s The Making of British Socialism and Jonathan Sperber’s Karl Marx: A Nineteenth Century Life. Both authors take it as axiomatic that the socialist utopia, with its quasi-eschatological promise of complete human emancipation, is an idea whose time has passed. But Bevir and, to a lesser degree, (...)
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  44. Henry E. Allison (1991). On a Presumed Gap in the Derivation of the Categorical Imperative. Philosophical Topics 19 (1):1-15.score: 30.0
  45. Alison McIntyre (2005). The Perils of Holism: Brad Hooker's Ideal Code, Real World. Philosophical Issues 15 (1):252–263.score: 30.0
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  46. Henry E. Allison (1987). Reflections on the B-Deduction. Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (S1):1-15.score: 30.0
  47. Gary S. Insch, Nancy McIntyre & Nancy K. Napier (2008). The Expatriate Glass Ceiling: The Second Layer of Glass. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 83 (1):19 - 28.score: 30.0
    The corporate glass ceiling continues to be a challenge for many organizations. However, women executives may be facing a second pane of obstruction – an expatriate glass ceiling – that prevents them from receiving the foreign management assignments and experience that is becoming increasing critical for promotion to upper management. The responsibility to break the expatriate glass ceiling lies with both female managers and the multinational corporations that utilize expatriates. In this paper, we propose pre-assignment, on-assignment, and post-assignment strategies for (...)
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  48. Henry E. Allison (1982). Practical and Transcendental Freedom in the Critique of Pure Reason. Kant-Studien 73 (1-4):271-290.score: 30.0
  49. David B. Allison (2005). Who is Zarathustra's Nietzsche? New Nietzsche Studies 6 (3/4/1/2):1-11.score: 30.0
  50. Henry E. Allison (1967). Christianity and Nonsense. Review of Metaphysics 20 (3):432 - 460.score: 30.0
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