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Profile: Allison Weir
  1. Allison Weir (2013). Feminism and the Islamic Revival: Freedom as a Practice of Belonging. Hypatia 28 (2):323-340.
    In her book, Politics of Piety: The Islamic Revival and the Feminist Subject, Saba Mahmood analyzes the practices of the women in the mosque movement in Cairo, Egypt. Mahmood argues that in order to recognize the participants as agents, we need to question the assumption that agency entails resistance to norms; moreover, we need to question the feminist allegiance to an unquestioned ideal of freedom. In this paper, I argue that rather than giving up the ideal of freedom, we can (...)
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  2. Allison Weir (2013). Identities and Freedom: Feminist Theory Between Power and Connection. Oxford University Press.
    How can we think about identities in the wake of feminist critiques of identity and identity politics? Allison Weir rethinks conceptions of individual and collective identities in relation to freedom.
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  3. Allison Weir (2009). Who Are We?: Modern Identities Between Taylor and Foucault. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (5):533-553.
    Charles Taylor and Michel Foucault offer two very different descriptions and analyses of modern identities. While it can be argued that Taylor and Foucault are thematizing two very different aspects of identity — Taylor is focusing on first-person, subjective, affirmed identity, and Foucault is focusing on third-person, or ascribed, category identity — in practice, these two are very much intertwined. I argue that attention to identities of race, gender, class and sexual orientation demands that we combine a Foucauldian power analysis (...)
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  4. Allison Weir (2008). Global Care Chains: Freedom, Responsibility, and Solidarity. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (S1):166-175.
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  5. Allison Weir (2008). Global Feminism and Transformative Identity Politics. Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 110-133.
    In this paper, Weir reconsiders identity politics and their relation to feminist solidarity. She argues that the dimension of identity as “identification-with” has been the liberatory dimension of identity politics, and that this dimension has been overshadowed and displaced by a focus on identity as category. Weir addresses critiques of identification as a ground of solidarity, and sketches a model of identity and identity politics based not in sameness, but in transformative historical process.
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  6. Allison Weir (2008). Home and Identity: In Memory of Iris Marion Young. Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 4-21.
    Drawing on Iris Marion Young’s essay, “House and Home: Feminist Variations on a Theme,” Weir argues for an alternative ideal of home that involves: (1) the risk of connection, and of sustaining relationship through conflict; (2) relational identities, constituted through both relations of power and relations of mutuality, love, and flourishing; (3) relational autonomy: freedom as the capacity to be in relationships one desires, and freedom as expansion of self in relationship; and (4) connection to past and future, through reinterpretive (...)
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  7. Allison Weir (2005). The Global Universal Caregiver: Imagining Women's Liberation in the New Millennium. Constellations 12 (3):308-330.
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  8. Allison Weir (1996). Sacrificial Logics: Feminist Theory and the Critique of Identity. Routledge.
    Contemporary feminist theory is at an impasse: the project of reformulating concepts of self and social identity is thwarted by an association between identity and oppression and victimhood. In Sacrificial Logics, Allison Weir proposes a way out of this impasse through a concept of identity which depends on accepting difference. Weir argues that the equation of identity with repression and domination links "relational" feminists like Nancy Chodorow, who equate self-identity with the repression of connection to others, and poststructuralist feminists like (...)
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