Search results for 'Alston S. Householder' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. William Alston (2001). Almeder, Robert," Dretske's Dreadful Question," Philosophia, 24 (1995), 449-57. Almeder, Robert," Externalism and Justification," Philosophia, 24 (1995), 465-69. Almeder, Robert, Harmless Naturalism: The IJmits of Science and the Nature of Philosophy, Open Court, 1998. Alston, William," Two Types of Foundationalism," Journal of Philosophy, LXXXII. [REVIEW] In Hilary Kornblith (ed.), Epistemology: Internalism and Externalism. Blackwell Publishers 2--261.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  37
    Alston S. Householder (1946). Mathematical Biophysics and the Central Nervous System. Acta Biotheoretica 8 (1-2):67-76.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  2
    Frederic B. Fitch (1946). Review: Alston S. Householder, Herbert D. Landahl, Mathematical Biophysics of the Central Nervous System. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 11 (3):99-99.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  7
    Margaret Alston & Kerri Whittenbury (2013). Does Climatic Crisis in Australia's Food Bowl Create a Basis for Change in Agricultural Gender Relations? Agriculture and Human Values 30 (1):115-128.
    An ongoing crisis in Australian agriculture resulting from climate crises including drought, decreasing irrigation water, more recent catastrophic flooding, and an uncertain policy environment is reshaping gender relations in the intimate sphere of the farm family. Drawing on research conducted in the Murray-Darling Basin area of Australia we ask the question: Does extreme hardship/climate crises change highly inequitable gender relations in agriculture? As farm income declines, Australian farm women are more likely to be working off farm for critical family income (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5.  4
    William P. Alston (1986). Does God Have Beliefs?: WILLIAM P. ALSTON. Religious Studies 22 (3-4):287-306.
    Beliefs are freely attributed to God nowadays in Anglo–American philosophical theology. This practice undoubtedly reflects the twentieth–century popularity of the view that knowledge consists of true justified belief . The connection is frequently made explicit. If knowledge is true justified belief then whatever God knows He believes. It would seem that much recent talk of divine beliefs stems from Nelson Pike's widely discussed article, ‘Divine Omniscience and Voluntary Action’. In this essay Pike develops a version of the classic argument for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6. Thomas F. Pettigrew & Denise A. Alston (1988). Tom Bradley's Campaign for Governor: The Dilemma of Race and Political Strategies. Upa.
    Examines the various explanations that have been given for Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley's losses in the 1982 and 1986 California gubernatorial campaigns. The authors offer important advice for all black candidates running against whites for office today.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. William P. Alston (1983). What's Wrong with Immediate Knowledge? Synthese 55 (April):73-96.
    Immediate knowledge is here construed as true belief that does not owe its status as knowledge to support by other knowledge (or justified belief) of the same subject. The bulk of the paper is devoted to a criticism of attempts to show the impossibility of immediate knowledge. I concentrate on attempts by Wilfrid Sellars and Laurence Bonjour to show that putative immediate knowledge really depends on higher-level knowledge or justified belief about the status of the beliefs involved in the putative (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  8. William P. Alston (1980). Some Remarks on Chisholm's Epistemology. Noûs 14 (4):565-586.
  9. William P. Alston (1951). Whitehead's Denial of Simple Location. Journal of Philosophy 48 (23):713-721.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  65
    William P. Alston & Thomas W. Smythe (1994). Swinburne's Argument for Dualism. Faith and Philosophy 11 (1):127-33.
  11.  24
    William P. Alston (1962). Ziff's Semantic Analysis. Journal of Philosophy 59 (1):5-20.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12.  15
    William P. Alston (1989). Review: Foley's Theory of Epistemic Rationality. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (1):135 - 147.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  4
    R. Alston (1997). Notice. Philo's Alexandria. DI Sly. The Classical Review 47 (1):214-215.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  6
    Garwood Alston (1890). Van wyk's vley. Transactions of the South African Philosophical Society 8 (1):35-39.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  8
    Richard Alston (2002). Military Marriage S. E. Phang: The Marriage of Roman Soldiers (13 Bc–Ad 235). Law and Family in the Imperial Army . Pp. VI + 470. Leiden, Boston, and Cologne: Brill, 2001. Cased, $112. Isbn: 90-04-12155-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (02):325-.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. William P. Alston (1985). Plantinga's Epistemology of Religious Belief. In James Tomberlin & Peter van Inwagen (eds.), Alvin Plantinga (Profiles, Vol. 5). D. Reidel Publishing Company 289-311.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. William P. Alston (1986). God's Action in the World. In Divine Nature and Human Language: Essays in Philosophical Theology. Cornell Up, 1989 197-222.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  8
    Review author[S.]: William P. Alston (1994). Reply to Commentators. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (4):891-899.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. A. S. Householder (1951). Review: James T. Culbertson, Consciousness and Behavior. A Neural Analysis of Behavior and of Consciousness. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 16 (4):286-287.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  76
    John Turri (2008). Practical and Epistemic Justification in Alston's Perceiving God. Faith and Philosophy 25 (3):290 - 299.
    This paper clarifies and evaluates a premise of William Alston’s argument in Perceiving God. The premise in question: if it is practically rational to engage in a doxastic practice, then it is epistemically rational to suppose that said practice is reliable. I first provide the background needed to understand how this premise fits into Alston’s main argument. I then present Alston’s main argument, and proceed to clarify, criticize, modify, and ultimately reject Alston’s argument for the premise (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. L. S. (2000). The Weak Reading of Authority in Hans Kelsen's Pure Theory of Law. Law and Philosophy 19 (2):131-171.
    Authority qua empowerment is the weak reading of authority in Hans Kelsen's writings. On the one hand, this reading appears to be unresponsive to the problem of authority as we know it from the tradition. On the other hand, it squares with legal positivism. Is Kelsen a legal positivist?Not without qualification. For he defends a normativity thesis along with the separation thesis, and it is at any rate arguable that the normativity thesis mandates a stronger reading of authority than that (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  40
    Richard Gale (1994). Why Alston's Mystical Doxastic Practice Is Subjective. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (4):869 - 875.
    Within each of the great religions there is a well established doxastic practice (DP) of taking experiential inputs consisting of apparent direct perceptions of God (M experiences) as giving prima facie justification, subject to defeat by overriders supplied by that religion, for belief outputs that God exists and is as he presents himself. (This DP is abbreviated as "MP.") William Alston's primary aim in his excellent book, Perceiving God, is to establish that we have epistemic justification for believing that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  23.  59
    Ulf Zackariasson (2006). A Problem with Alston's Indirect Analogy-Argument From Religious Experience. Religious Studies 42 (3):329-341.
    In this paper, William Alston's argument from religious experience in Perceiving God is characterized and assessed as an indirect analogy-argument. Such arguments, I propose, should establish two similarities between sense perception (SP) and religious experience (CMP): a structural and a functional. I argue that Alston neglects functional similarity, and that SP and CMP actually perform different functions within the practices they belong to. Alston's argument is therefore significantly weaker than generally assumed. Finally, I argue that regardless of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  35
    Julian Willard (2001). Alston's Epistemology of Religious Belief and the Problem of Religious Diversity. Religious Studies 37 (1):59-74.
    In this paper I examine William Alston's work on the epistemology of religious belief, focusing on the threat to the epistemic status of Christian belief presented by awareness of religious diversity. I argue that Alston appears to misunderstand the epistemic significance of the ‘practical rationality’ of the Christian mystical practice. I suggest that this error is due to a more fundamental misunderstanding, regarding the significance of practical rationality, in Alston's ‘doxastic practice’ approach to epistemology ; an error (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  22
    Richard Gale (1994). The Overall Argument of Alston's "Perceiving God". Religious Studies 30 (2):135 - 149.
    Alston's overall aim in Perceiving God is to show that we are rationally justified in believing that our apparent direct perceptions of God's presence are reliable and thus for the most part veridical, the objective, existentially-committed beliefs based on these experiences thereby being prima facie justified, subject to defeat by certain overriders supplied by some background religion. It is argued that our rational justification for believing this is of both an epistemic and pragmatic sort, in which an epistemic reason (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  5
    Acts Alston’S.‘Illocutionary (2007). Re Definition and Alston's 'Illocutionary Acts'friedrich Christoph Doerge University of Tübingen. Grazer Philosophische Studien 73:97-111.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. William Mckenith (2004). William P. Alston's Epistemology of Religious Experience: The Problem of Subjectivism. Dissertation, Drew University
    William P. Alston's book, Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience , challenges the contemporary view that religious experience is purely subjective. He theorizes that a direct experiential awareness of God can produce immediately justified beliefs about God. Accordingly, this dissertation critically assesses the problem of subjectivism thought to taint Alston's epistemology of religious experience. ;Upon disclosing the prevalence of subjectivity, and identifying the potential for objectivity in religious experience, this treatise produces a viable resolve for objectivity in (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  51
    Jay F. Rosenberg (2006). Still Mythic After All Those Years: On Alston's Latest Defense of the Given. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (1):157-173.
    Wilfrid Sellars' conclusion in "Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind" that "the Given" is a "Myth" quickly elicited philosophical opposition and remains contentious fifty years later. William Alston has challenged that conclusion on several occasions by attempting to devise an acceptable account of perception committed to the givenness of perceived objects. His most recent challenge advances a "Theory of Appearing" which posits irreducible non-conceptual relations, ostensibly overlooked by Sellars, e.g., of "looking red", between the subject and the object perceived, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  28
    Mohammad Ali Mobini (2013). Alston's Anti-Justificationism as a Strategy to Resolve the Conflict Between Internalism and Externalism. Heythrop Journal 54 (2):197-202.
    After a justificationist period, William P. Alston has tried to eliminate justification from the epistemology of belief. He introduced a list of epistemic desiderata all of which contribute to the positive status of beliefs and none of which has an exclusive and decisive role so that it could be isolated as the property of being justified. Careful examination reveals, however, that this list includes fewer desiderata than advertised. Truth-conducive desiderata are most important for Alston, and these are five; (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  25
    Friedrich Christoph Doerge (2006). Re-Definition and Alston's 'Illocutionary Acts'. Grazer Philosophische Studien 73 (1):97-111.
    The original definition of a technical term, the paper argues, should not be altered without a good reason. This notion is applied to the conception of illocutionary acts suggested by Alston, which markedly differs from the conception originally introduced by John L. Austin. Alston appears to agree with the argument; at least, he does attempt to justify his re-definition. The paper argues, however, that the reasons he gives fail.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  66
    Marshall Swain (1988). Alston's Internalistic Externalism. Philosophical Perspectives 2:461-473.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  38
    Matthew Chrisman (2007). Review of William P. Alston's Beyond Justification. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (2).
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  10
    Robert Pierson (2003). Alston's Concept of Justification. Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):49-58.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  36
    Kevin Meeker (1994). William Alston's Epistemology of Religious Experience. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 35 (2):89 - 110.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Richard Gale (1994). The Overall Argument of Alston's Perceiving God. Religious Studies 30 (2):135.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  20
    Robert Pasnau (1993). Justified Until Proven Guilty: Alston's New Epistemology. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 72 (1):1 - 33.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  12
    Michael B. Wakoff (1999). Alston's Practical Rationality Argument. Journal of Philosophical Research 24:247-284.
    William AIston has argued that the prospects are dim for demonstrating with out epistemic circularity that any of our fundamental doxastic practices are reliable. In response to this predicament, he supplies a pragmatic rationale for our continued engagement in these practices. I argue that either he relativizes the practical rationality of engaging in a doxastic practice to participants, which ill suits his aim of providing a realist account of the practice that provides nonparticipants with are as on to trust that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  8
    Richard N. Faber (1969). Alston's Theory of Meaning. Philosophical Quarterly 19 (74):62-68.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Dean A. Kowalski (2011). Remembering Alston's ‘Evaluative Particularism’. Religious Studies 47 (3):265-284.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Jonathan L. Kvanvig (1994). ``A Critical Notice of Alston's P Erceiving God &Quot. Faith and Philosophy 11:311-321.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  8
    D. S. Robertson (1942). Fred Walter Householder Jr.: Literary Quotation and Allusion in Lucian. Pp. Xii +103. Morningside Heights, New York: King's Crown Press (Columbia University Press), 1941. Paper, $2. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (02):93-.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  21
    Vincent Colapietro, Ian M. Crystal, Gunnar Foss & Eivind Kasa (2003). Alston, William P., Editor. Realism & Antirealism. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2002. Pp. Viii+ 303. Paper, $22.50. Aportone, Anselmo, Francesco Aronadio, and Paolo Spinicci. Il Problema Dell'intuizione: Tre Studi Su Platone, Kant, E Husserl. Naples: Bibliopolis, 2002. Pp. 196. Paper,€ 20.00. Arrington, Robert L., Editor. The World's Great Philosophers. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2003. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  10
    K. Mitchells (1965). Edmund Husserl, The Idea of Phenomenology (Translated by William P. Alston and Nakhinian George and Introduced by Nakhinian George), Xxii and 60 Pp., Guilders 5,50,The Phenomenology of Internal Time-Consciousness (Translated by James S. Churchill and Introduced by Calvin O. Schrag), 188 Pp., Guilders 11,50. Both Volumes Published by Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague 1964. [REVIEW] Philosophy 40 (152):174-.
  44.  12
    Elizabeth Drummond Young (2013). God's Moral Goodness and Supererogation. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (2):83-95.
    What do we understand by God’s goodness? William Alston claims that by answering this question convincingly, divine command theory can be strengthened against some major objections. He rejects the idea that God’s goodness lies in the area of moral obligations. Instead, he proposes that God’s goodness is best described by the phenomenon of supererogation. Joseph Lombardi, in response, agrees with Alston that God does not have moral obligations but says that having rejected moral obligation as the content of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  30
    Elizabeth Drummond Young (2013). God's Moral Goodness and Supererogation. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (2):83-95.
    What do we understand by God’s goodness? William Alston claims that by answering this question convincingly, divine command theory can be strengthened against some major objections. He rejects the idea that God’s goodness lies in the area of moral obligations. Instead, he proposes that God’s goodness is best described by the phenomenon of supererogation. Joseph Lombardi, in response, agrees with Alston that God does not have moral obligations but says that having rejected moral obligation as the content of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  10
    Ray S. Yeo (2014). Scripture's Practical Authority and the Response of Faith From a Speech‐Act Theoretic Perspective. Heythrop Journal 57 (4).
    This paper brings together the work of Nicholas Wolterstorff and William Alston in speech-act theory with the aim of providing a deeper understanding of the nature of divine speaking through the medium of Scripture. Despite the fecundity of Wolterstorff's seminal work on the philosophical theology of Scripture, aspects of his speech-act centric account are underdeveloped and would benefit from the contributions of William Alston. In particular, his account of divine speech-acts could be fruitfully expanded by incorporating the concept (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  14
    Joseph L. Lombardi (2005). Against God's Moral Goodness. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (2):313-326.
    While denying that God has moral obligations, William Alston defends divine moral goodness based on God’s performance of supererogatory acts. The present article argues that an agent without obligations cannot perform supererogatory acts. Hence, divine moral goodness cannot be established on that basis. Defenses of divine moral obligation by Eleonore Stump and Nicholas Wolterstorff are also questioned. Against Stump, it is argued (among other things) that the temptations of Jesus do not establish the existence of a tendency to sin (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  48.  47
    Adam Green (2009). Reading the Mind of God (Without Hebrew Lessons): Alston, Shared Attention, and Mystical Experience. Religious Studies 45 (4):455-470.
    Alston's perceptual account of mystical experience fails to show how it is that the sort of predicates that are used to describe God in these experiences could be derived from perception, even though the ascription of matched predicates in the natural order are not derived in the manner Alston has in mind. In contrast, if one looks to research on shared attention between individuals as mediated by mirror neurons, then one can give a perceptual account of mystical experience (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49.  4
    J. L. Schellenberg (1994). Religious Experience and Religious Diversity: A Reply to Alston: J. L. SCHELLENBERG. Religious Studies 30 (2):151-159.
    William Alston's Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience is a most significant contribution to the philosophy of religion. The product of 50 years' reflection on its topic , this work provides a very thorough explication and defence of what Alston calls the ‘mystical perceptual practice’ – the practice of forming beliefs about the Ultimate on the basis of putative ‘direct experiential awareness’ thereof . Alston argues, in particular, for the rationality of engaging in the Christian form (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  31
    John Zeis (1990). A Critique of Plantinga's Theological Foundationalism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 28 (3):173 - 189.
    I think that the epistemological theory presented by Plantinga would be more plausible if it were amended in a way that would be consistent with the no-foundations view suggested above. We have considered in detail his conception of basic beliefs in Section II above, and noted that his conception of basicality was obscure. For Plantinga, beliefs are basic only under certain conditions, and this is an obscure notion of basicality because unlike basic beliefs in a more traditional foundationalist theory, there (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000