Search results for 'Alston S. Householder' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alston S. Householder (1946). Mathematical Biophysics and the Central Nervous System. Acta Biotheoretica 8 (1-2).score: 870.0
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  2. Frederic B. Fitch (1946). Review: Alston S. Householder, Herbert D. Landahl, Mathematical Biophysics of the Central Nervous System. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 11 (3):99-99.score: 450.0
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  3. A. S. Householder (1951). Review: James T. Culbertson, Consciousness and Behavior. A Neural Analysis of Behavior and of Consciousness. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 16 (4):286-287.score: 240.0
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  4. D. S. Robertson (1942). Fred Walter Householder Jr.: Literary Quotation and Allusion in Lucian. Pp. Xii +103. Morningside Heights, New York: King's Crown Press (Columbia University Press), 1941. Paper, $2. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (02):93-.score: 126.0
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  5. J. Lawrence French (2010). Children's Labor Market Involvement, Household Work, and Welfare: A Brazilian Case Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (1):63 - 78.score: 52.0
    The large numbers of children working in developing countries continue to provoke calls for an end to such employment. However, many reformers argue that efforts should focus on ending the exploitation of children rather than depriving them of all opportunities to work. This posture reflects recognition of the multiplicity of needs children have and the diversity of situations in which they work. Unfortunately, research typically neglects these complexities and fails to distinguish between types of labor market jobs, dismisses household chores (...)
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  6. Peder Anker (2003). The Philosopher's Cabin and the Household of Nature. Ethics, Place and Environment 6 (2):131 – 141.score: 48.0
    The etymological origin of ecology in the human house is the point of departure of this article. It argues that oikos is not merely a vague metaphor for ecology, but that built households provide a key to understanding the household of nature. Three households support this claim: the cabins of Henry Thoreau, Aldo Leopold and Arne Noess. The article suggests that their views on the household of nature stand in direct relationship with their respective homes. They also have a distant (...)
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  7. Nancy Folbre & Marjorie Abel (forthcoming). Women's Work and Women's Households: Gender Bias in the US Census. Social Research.score: 46.7
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  8. Ronald Syme (1939). F. A. Evelyn: Caesar's Household. A Tragedy. Pp. 74. London: Heath Cranton, 1938. Paper, Is. 6d. The Classical Review 53 (01):42-.score: 46.7
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  9. D. Brendan Nagle (2006). The Household as the Foundation of Aristotle's Polis. Cambridge University Press.score: 46.0
    Among ancient writers Aristotle offers the most profound analysis of the ancient Greek household and its relationship to the state. The household was not the family in the modern sense of the term, but a much more powerful entity with significant economic, political, social, and educational resources. The success of the polis in all its forms lay in the reliability of households to provide it with the kinds of citizens it needed to ensure its functioning. In turn, the state offered (...)
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  10. Tomáš Jakuba, Zuzana Polcová, Denisa Fedáková, Jana Kottferová, Jana Mareková, Magdaléna Fejsáková, Olga Ondrašovičová & Miloslav Ondrašovič (2013). Differences in Evaluation of a Dog's Temperament by Individual Members of the Same Household. Society and Animals 21 (6):582-589.score: 44.0
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  11. Charilaos Platanakis (2008). Philosophy (D.B.) Nagle The Household as the Foundation of Aristotle's Polis. Cambridge UP, 2006. Pp. 352. £48. 780521849340. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 128:283-.score: 40.0
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  12. René Schérer (1997). Fourier's “Familism” Against the Household. Angelaki 2 (1):125 – 132.score: 40.0
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  13. Nicole Renick Thomson (2007). Justice in the Home: Children's and Adolescents' Perceptions of the Fair Distribution of Household Chores. Journal of Moral Education 36 (1):19-36.score: 40.0
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  14. Lindsay Driediger (2009). Religion in the Household (J.) Bodel, (S.M.) Olyan (Edd.) Household and Family Religion in Antiquity. Pp. Xviii + 324, Ills, Map. Malden, MA, Oxford and Carlton: Blackwell Publishing, 2008. Cased, £55, €74.30. ISBN: 978-1-4051-7579-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (02):524-.score: 40.0
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  15. Robert Mayhew (2006). Review of D. Brendan Nagle, The Household As the Foundation of Aristotle's Polis. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (7).score: 40.0
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  16. Melissa M. Shew (2009). The Household as the Foundation of Aristotle's Polis. Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):225-229.score: 40.0
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  17. Peter Simpson (2007). The Household as the Foundation of Aristotle's Polis (Review). Classical World 101 (1):113-114.score: 40.0
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  18. Rene Scherer (1997). Fourier's “Familism” Against the Household. Angelaki 2 (1):125-132.score: 40.0
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  19. Gabriella Ildiko Baika (2010). Gina L. Greco and Christine M. Rose, Transs., The Good Wife's Guide: Le Ménagier de Paris. A Medieval Household Book. Ithaca, NY, and London: Cornell University Press, 2009. Pp. Xii, 367; Black-and-White Frontispiece and 1 Black-and-White Figure. $69.95 (Cloth); $24.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (3):678-679.score: 40.0
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  20. Ren (1997). Fourier's “Familism” Against the Household. Angelaki 2 (1):125 – 132.score: 40.0
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  21. Lourdes Beneria (2008). From "Harmony" to "Cooperative Conflicts" Amartya Sen's Contribution to Household Theory. In Kaushik Basu & Ravi Kanbur (eds.), Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen: Volume I: Ethics, Welfare, and Measurement and Volume Ii: Society, Institutions, and Development. Oup Oxford.score: 40.0
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  22. Fred A. Cazel (1988). Chris Given-Wilson, The Royal Household and the King's Affinity: Service, Politics and Finance in England, 1360–1413. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1986. Pp. Viii, 327. $32.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 63 (1):155-157.score: 40.0
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  23. Federico R. León (2013). Predicting Contraceptive Use From an Egalitarian Model of Women's Overall Household Power Vis-À-Vis Conventional Power Models and Third Variables. Journal of Biosocial Science 45 (4):497-515.score: 40.0
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  24. H. Lindsay (2005). The Household and the Making of History: A Subversive View of the Western Past. By Mary S. Hartman. The European Legacy 10 (7):761.score: 40.0
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  25. Richard L. Rohrbaugh (forthcoming). Book Review: The Quest for Home: Household in Mark's Community. [REVIEW] Interpretation 57 (2):216-218.score: 40.0
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  26. Allison Weir (2009). Who Are We?: Modern Identities Between Taylor and Foucault. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (5):533-553.score: 24.0
    Charles Taylor and Michel Foucault offer two very different descriptions and analyses of modern identities. While it can be argued that Taylor and Foucault are thematizing two very different aspects of identity — Taylor is focusing on first-person, subjective, affirmed identity, and Foucault is focusing on third-person, or ascribed, category identity — in practice, these two are very much intertwined. I argue that attention to identities of race, gender, class and sexual orientation demands that we combine a Foucauldian power analysis (...)
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  27. Lise F. Vail (2002). "Unlike a Fool, He Is Not Defiled": Ascetic Purity and Ethics in the Saṃnyāsa Upaniṣads. Journal of Religious Ethics 30 (3):373 - 397.score: 24.0
    The authors of the "Saṃnyāsa Upaniṣads", manuals of ascetic lifestyle and practice, recommend that wanderers renounce behavioral standards of their formerly Brahmin householder life, including ritual purity and familial duties. Patrick Olivelle argues that these ascetics are thereafter considered impure and corpse- or ghoul-like, clearly lacking in dharma. However, these Upanisads counsel pursuing mental purity and moral behavior, and modeling oneself after the perfection of the Absolute. This essay investigates ascetic notions of purity and identity, and virtues such as (...)
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  28. John H. Barnett (1985). A Business Model of Enlightenment. Journal of Business Ethics 4 (1):57 - 63.score: 24.0
    This article examines spiritual growth and the business career. Rather than a certain decline into workaholism or materialism, the world of business becomes a necessary step on the path of enlightenment, through the transcendant philosophical models of the Hindu householder and the Native American Medicine Wheel.The householder concept, including mastering the material world and the resulting spiritual growth, stresses the importance of action, also a criterion for success in business. Current views, based on studies of modern life, Judaic (...)
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  29. Chen-Fong Wu (2002). Business Should Be its Own Therapist: Observing the "Governance Ethics" of Taiwanese Enterprises. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 40 (4):363 - 371.score: 24.0
    Taiwanese enterprises generally display a tacit acceptance and practice of globally-recognized business ethics such as the respect of human rights. Yet some Taiwanese business supervisors subscribe instead to a philosophy of leadership, dubbed "pseudo-harmony", which actively seeks to evade responsibility and any conflict of interest with profitability. Meanwhile other Taiwanese entrepreneurs are even less enlightened, dictatorially upholding self-serving regimes which operate on a philosophy which is euphemistically referred to as "householder management".These attitudes result in the sub-optimal development of "organizational (...)
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  30. Donna L. Leonetti & Benjamin Chabot-Hanowell (2011). The Foundation of Kinship. Human Nature 22 (1-2):16-40.score: 24.0
    Men’s hunting has dominated the discourse on energy capture and flow in the past decade or so. We turn to women’s roles as critical to household formation, pair-bonding, and intergenerational bonds. Their pivotal contributions in food processing and distribution likely promoted kinship, both genetic and affinal, and appear to be the foundation from which households evolved. With conscious recognition of household social units, variable cultural constructions of human kinship systems that were sensitive to environmental and technological conditions could emerge. Kinship (...)
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  31. Colin J. Pilbeam, Sudarshan B. Mathema, Peter J. Gregory & Padma B. Shakya (2005). Soil Fertility Management in the Mid-Hills of Nepal: Practices and Perceptions. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 22 (2):243-258.score: 24.0
    Sustaining soil fertility is essential to the prosperity of many households in the mid-hills of Nepal, but there are concerns that the breakdown of the traditional linkages between forest, livestock, and cropping systems is adversely affecting fertility. This study used triangulated data from surveys of households, discussion groups, and key informants in 16 wards in eastern and western Nepal to determine the existing practices for soil fertility management, the extent of such practices, and the perception of the direction of changes (...)
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  32. Anne C. Bellows (2003). Exposing Violences: Using Women's Human Rights Theory to Reconceptualize Food Rights. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (3):249-279.score: 22.0
    Exposing food violences – hunger,malnutrition, and poisoning from environmentalmismanagement – requires policy action thatconfronts the structured invisibility of theseviolences. Along with the hidden deprivation offood is the physical and political isolation ofcritical knowledge on food violences and needs,and for policy strategies to address them. Iargue that efforts dedicated on behalf of ahuman right to food can benefit from thetheoretical analysis and activist work of theinternational Women's Rights are Human Rights(WRHR) movement. WRHR focuses on women andgirls; the food rights movement operates (...)
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  33. Isidro Rimarachín Cabrera, Emma Zapata Martelo & Verónica Vázquez García (2001). Gender, Rural Households, and Biodiversity in Native Mexico. Agriculture and Human Values 18 (1):85-93.score: 22.0
    Knowledge about maize varieties is the key to rural households' survival in native Mexico. Native peoples relate to nature in particular ways and they play a crucial role in maintaining biodiversity. This paper discusses the relationship between native women's accumulated knowledge on maize varieties and the laboratory analysis of the species that they manage. Fieldwork was conducted in an Otomí community, San Pablo Arriba, located in the state of Mexico.
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  34. Rie Makita (2009). The Visibility of Women's Work for Poverty Reduction: Implications From Non-Crop Agricultural Income-Generating Programs in Bangladesh. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (4):379-390.score: 22.0
    This article explores mechanisms for making poor rural women’s work visible by drawing on Amartya Sen’s intra-family “cooperative conflict” theory to explain the workings of two Bangladesh non-governmental organization’s income-generating programs (rearing poultry and rearing silkworms). On the assumption that cooperation surpasses conflict in the intra-family relations when women’s work is visible, the article identifies factors that influence intra-family conflict and cooperation. At entry, cooperation in a family depends on how successfully the family can make women’s income-generating activities compatible with (...)
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  35. Brian M. Wood & Frank W. Marlowe (2013). Household and Kin Provisioning by Hadza Men. Human Nature 24 (3):280-317.score: 22.0
    We use data collected among Hadza hunter-gatherers between 2005 and 2009 to examine hypotheses about the causes and consequences of men’s foraging and food sharing. We find that Hadza men foraged for a range of food types, including fruit, honey, small animals, and large game. Large game were shared not like common goods, but in ways that significantly advantaged producers’ households. Food sharing and consumption data show that men channeled the foods they produced to their wives, children, and their consanguineal (...)
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  36. Jess Bonnan-White, Andrea Hightower & Ameena Issa (2013). Of Couscous and Occupation: A Case Study of Women's Motivations to Join and Participate in Palestinian Fair Trade Cooperatives. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):337-350.score: 22.0
    Economic opportunities and the status of women are mediated by socio-political structural factors, as well as cultural-specific norms and patterns of behavior. As consumers (and, in many cases, regulators) of resources at the household level, women are integral to the analysis of economic and political development. This paper examines the role of motivation and perception on women’s participation in Palestinian Fair Trade projects. In the occupied Palestinian Territories, Fair Trade projects have been recently introduced by both international agencies and local (...)
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  37. Robert J. Quinlan (2001). Effect of Household Structure on Female Reproductive Strategies in a Caribbean Village. Human Nature 12 (3):169-189.score: 22.0
    Household structure may have strong effects on reproduction. This study uses household demographic data for 59 women in a Caribbean village to test evolutionary hypotheses concerning variation in reproductive strategies. Father-absence during childhood, current household composition, and household economic status are predicted to influence age at first birth, number of mates, reproductive success, and pair-bond stability. Criterion variables did not associate in a manner indicative of r- and K-strategies. Father-absence in early childhood had little influence on subsequent reproduction. Household wealth (...)
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  38. Joan Tronto (2011). "The Servant Problem" and Justice in Households. Iris. European Journal of Philosophy and Public Debate 2 (3):67-85.score: 18.0
    In this paper I consider what may seem an "accidental" family relationship and stress its worrying attributes for contemporary family life. While we have made strides in being willing and able to "queer" kinship relationships, another frontier remains in thinking about the family. Not all forms of family relations are kinship or quasi-kinship relationships. I refer to a kind of family relationship that remains very largely invisible: that between the household's kin and their domestic servants. Throughout most of the twentieth (...)
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  39. Bruce V. Foltz (2006). The Resurrection of Nature: Environmental Metaphysics in Sergei Bulgakov's Philosophy of Economy. Philosophy and Theology 18 (1):121-142.score: 18.0
    Although equal in power to other facets of the rich cultural ferment of modern Russia that have profoundly influenced Western civilization—such as painting, literature, drama, and politics—the authentic legacy of twentieth-century Russian philosophy has until recently been eclipsed by Soviet ideological dominance. Of the important philosophers drawing upon the characteristically Russian synthesis of Ancient Neoplatonism, German Idealism, and Byzantine spirituality, Sergei Bulgakov is outstanding, and his work has important implications for our contemporary thinking about the relationship between humanity and nature (...)
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  40. Serene J. Khader (2011). Adaptive Preferences and Women's Empowerment. OUP USA.score: 18.0
    Women and other oppressed and deprived people sometimes collude with the forces that perpetuate injustice against them. Women's acceptance of their lesser claim on household resources like food, their positive attitudes toward clitoridectemy and infibulations, their acquiescence to violence at the hands of their husbands, and their sometimes fatalistic attitudes toward their own poverty or suffering are all examples of "adaptive preferences," wherein women participate in their own deprivation. -/- Adaptive Preferences and Women's Empowerment offers a definition of adaptive preference (...)
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  41. Daniel N. Shaviro (2006). Households and the Fiscal System. Social Philosophy and Policy 23 (2):185-209.score: 18.0
    One of the most vexed issues in income tax policy is how family or household status should affect tax liability. This article suggests a general approach for thinking about the treatment of households in the fiscal system generally under a utilitarian social welfare norm. The United States fiscal rules considered include those not only in the income tax but under Social Security, Medicare, and safety net programs. Among the recommendations that emerge from the analysis are (1) recognizing couples for tax (...)
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  42. Zuhal Bahar, Hale Okçay, şeyda Özbıçakçı, Ayşe Beşer, Besti üstün & Meryem Öztürk (2005). The Effects of Islam and Traditional Practices on Women's Health and Reproduction. Nursing Ethics 12 (6):557-570.score: 18.0
    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Islam as a religion and culture on Turkish women’s health. The study included 138 household members residing in the territory of three primary health care centers in Turkey: Güzelbahçe, Fahrettin Altay and Esentepe. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire prepared by a multidisciplinary team that included specialists from the departments of public health, psychiatric nursing and sociology. We found that the women’s health behavior changed from traditional to (...)
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  43. M. Elijah Baloyi (2014). A Pastoral Examination of the Christian Church's Response to Fears of and Reactions to Witchcraft Amongst African People in the Limpopo Province of South Africa. Hts Theological Studies 70 (2):01-09.score: 18.0
    ABSTRACT Amongst other things, African culture (societies) has been characterised by its perception and fear of witchcraft. Even though the belief in witchcraft is an old phenomenon, its growth is revealed and to some extent mitigated by videos, films and accounts and stories of church ministers. Whilst some Christian worship services have been turned into witchcraft-centred campaigns against witchcraft, a second group perceive witchcraft as a way of getting rid of one's enemies and a third group see it as the (...)
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  44. Walter W. McMahon & Moses Oketch (2013). Education's Effects on Individual Life Chances and on Development: An Overview. British Journal of Educational Studies 61 (1):79 - 107.score: 18.0
    This paper estimates the effects of human capital skills largely created through education on life's chances over the life cycle. Qualifications as a measure of these skills affect earnings, and schooling affects private and social non-market benefits beyond earnings. Private non-market benefits include better own-health, child health, spousal health, infant mortality, longevity, fertility, household efficiency, asset management and happiness. Social benefits include increased democratisation, civil rights, political stability, reduced crime, lower prison, health and welfare costs, and new ideas. Individual benefits (...)
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  45. Marcia L. Nation (2010). Understanding Women's Participation in Irrigated Agriculture: A Case Study From Senegal. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 27 (2):163-176.score: 18.0
    As climate change in West Africa poses profound limitations on rainfed agriculture, policymakers and practitioners may again turn to irrigated agriculture to provide food for a growing population. Gendered analyses of irrigation projects reveal that in many cases women’s participation in irrigated agriculture has been limited due to a lack of access to land and water. Past research in the Upper Valley of the Senegal River suggests that variables other than access to land and water condition women’s participation in irrigated (...)
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  46. Patricia J. Thompson (1994). Dismantling the Master's House: A Hestian / Hermean Deconstruction of Classic Texts. Hypatia 9 (4):38 - 56.score: 18.0
    Classical philosophy adopts the standpoint of males in the Greek polis. The consequent adumbration of the standpoint of women and noncitizen men in the oikos, the household, has implications for feminist philosophy. Two systems of action are differentiated: the domestic economy protected by the goddess Hestia, and the political economy protected by Hermes. Shifting one's standpoint to include both the oikos and the polis offers an alternative to gender as the defining issue in feminist theory.
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  47. Plessis Cd (2005). Globalization and the Threat to Women's Progress From Poor Men of the South. African Journal of Business Ethics 1 (1):8.score: 18.0
    Control over economic surplus is the biggest contributor towards women's substantive equality in society. Furthermore, surplusgenerating women prioritize spending on family nutrition, health and education, which yields long-term social benefits at macrolevel. Globalization's marginalization of poor men in the Global South, from both the formal and informal economies, diminishes men's strategic indispensability in the community and household, and results in resistance to women's increased independence. Men's perceived sense of loss of control acts as trigger for an increase in domestic and (...)
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  48. Peter Murphy & Trevor Hogan (2012). Discordant Order: Manila's Neo-Patrimonial Urbanism. Thesis Eleven 112 (1):10-34.score: 18.0
    Manila is one of the world’s most fragmented, privatized and un-public of cities. Why is this so? This paper contemplates the seemingly immutable privacy of the city of Manila, and the paradoxical character of its publicity. Manila is our prime exemplar of the 21st-century mega-city whose apparent disorder discloses a coherent order which we here call ‘neo-patrimonial urbanism’. Manila is a city where poor and rich alike have their own government, infrastructure, and armies, the shopping malls are the simulacra of (...)
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  49. Dawn B. Neill (2007). Indo-Fijian Children's BMI. Human Nature 18 (3):209-224.score: 18.0
    Health research has shown that overweight and obesity in children and adults are becoming significant public health problems in the developing world. Evidence suggests that this phenomenon is more marked in urban than rural areas and may be associated with modernization. However, the underlying reasons for this nutrition transition remain unclear. Dietary shifts, often in conjunction with income and time constraints in urban environments, may entail a greater reliance on more convenient sugar and fat-dense food. Also, the necessity of labor-intensive (...)
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  50. Ann Waters-Bayer (1994). Studying Pastoral Women's Knowledge in Milk Processing and Marketing — for Whose Empowerment? Agriculture and Human Values 11 (2-3):85-95.score: 18.0
    Studies of local knowledge and farmer participatory research tend to focus on raising crops and livestock. Little attention is given to processing and marketing farm products, an important source of income for rural households, particularly women.This article presents the case of an investigation into processing and marketing of milk products by agropastoral Fulani women, which revealed how the women under stand local market forces and recognize important social and even local political functions of their marketing activities. However, it also revealed (...)
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