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Profile: Altug Yalcintas (Ankara University)
  1. Altug Yalcintas (forthcoming). The Problem of Epistemic Cost: Why Do Economists Not Change Their Minds (About the 'Coase Theorem')? American Journal of Economics and Sociology.
    Errors in the history of economic analysis often remain uncorrected for long periods due to positive epistemic costs (PEC) involved in allocating time to going back over what older generations wrote. In order to demonstrate this in a case study, the economists’ practice of the “Coase Theorem” is reconsidered from a PEC point of view.
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  2. Altug Yalcintas (2012). A Notion Evolving: From 'Institutional Path Dependence' to 'Intellectual Path Dependence. Economics Bulletin 32 (2):1092-1098.
    How do ideas evolve? Can one speak of scientific progress when there is more than one pathway of intellectual evolution in which different ideas emerge and flow in different directions? Is the history of economic analysis a compilation of a number of intellectual pathways? This essay argues that it is possible to understand the course of history as a number of overlapping, divergent, and endlessly changing pathways. Such pathways operate in different fashions. They sometimes lead to more coherent and high (...)
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  3. Altug Yalcintas (2011). A Review Essay on David Laibman's Deep History: A Study in Social Evolution and Human Potential. Journal of Philosophical Economics 5 (1):168-182.
    The frequency of historical materialist explanations in evolutionary social sciences is very low even though historical materialism and evolutionism have great many shared aims towards explaining the long term social change. David Laibman in his Deep History (2007) picks up some of the standard questions of evolutionary social theory and aims at advancing the conception of historical materialism so as to develop a Marxist theory of history from an evolutionary point of view. The contribution of Laibman’s work is to show (...)
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  4. Altug Yalcintas (2011). On Error: Undisciplined Thoughts on One of the Causes of Intellectual Path Dependency. Ankara University SBF Review 66 (2):215-233.
    Is there not any place in the history of ideas for the imperfect character of human doings (i.e. capability of error) that is repeated for so long until we lately start to think that it had long been wrong? The answer is: In the conventional histories of ideas there is almost none. The importance of the phenomenon,however, is immense. Intellectual history is full of errors. Scholarly errors are among the factors that generate intellectual pathways in which consequences of historical small (...)
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  5. Altug Yalcintas (2010). PHD Thesis Summary: Intellectual Paths and Pathologies: How Small Events in Scholarly Life Accidentally Grow Big (2009). Erasmus Journal of Philosophy and Economics 3 (1):123-125.
  6. Altug Yalcintas (2009). Book Review of David Ruccio's Economic Representations: Academic and Everyday (2008). [REVIEW] Journal of Economic Issues 43 (4):1089-1091.
  7. Altug Yalcintas (2009). Intellectual Paths and Pathologies: How Small Events in Scholarly Life Accidentally Grow Big. Dissertation, Erasmus University Rotterdam
  8. Altug Yalcintas (2008). Book Review of Kurt Dopfer's The Evolutionary Foundations of Economics (2005). [REVIEW] Review of Political Economy 20 (1):161-163.
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  9. Altug Yalcintas (2006). Historical Small Events and the Eclipse of Utopia: Perspectives on Path Dependence in Human Thought. Culture, Theory, and Critique 47 (1):53-70.
    Questions such as ‘What if such small companies as Hewletts and the Varians had not been established in Santa Clara County in California?’ or ‘What if Q-type keyboards had not been invented?’ are well known among economists. The questions point at a phenomenon called path dependence: ‘small events’, the argument goes, may cause the evolution of institutions to lock in to specific paths that may produce undesirable consequences. How about applying such skeptical views in economics to human ideas and thought (...)
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