Search results for 'Amanda C. Brandone' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andrei Cimpian, Amanda C. Brandone & Susan A. Gelman (2010). Generic Statements Require Little Evidence for Acceptance but Have Powerful Implications. Cognitive Science 34 (8):1452-1482.score: 870.0
    Generic statements (e.g., “Birds lay eggs”) express generalizations about categories. In this paper, we hypothesized that there is a paradoxical asymmetry at the core of generic meaning, such that these sentences have extremely strong implications but require little evidence to be judged true. Four experiments confirmed the hypothesized asymmetry: Participants interpreted novel generics such as “Lorches have purple feathers” as referring to nearly all lorches, but they judged the same novel generics to be true given a wide range of prevalence (...)
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  2. Amanda C. Brandone & Susan A. Gelman (2009). Differences in Preschoolers' and Adults' Use of Generics About Novel Animals and Artifacts: A Window Onto a Conceptual Divide. Cognition 110 (1):1-22.score: 870.0
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  3. Amanda Brandone, Andrei Cimpian, Sarah-Jane Leslie & Susan Gelman (2012). Do Lions Have Manes? For Children, Generics Are About Kinds, Not Quantities. Child Development 83:423-433.score: 240.0
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  4. Robert N. Brandon, Janis Antonovics, Richard Burian, Scott Carson, Greg Cooper, Paul Sheldon Davies, Christopher Horvath, Brent D. Mishler, Robert C. Richardson, Kelly Smith & Peter Thrall (1994). Sober on Brandon on Screening-Off and the Levels of Selection. Philosophy of Science 61 (3):475-486.score: 20.0
    Sober (1992) has recently evaluated Brandon's (1982, 1990; see also 1985, 1988) use of Salmon's (1971) concept of screening-off in the philosophy of biology. He critiques three particular issues, each of which will be considered in this discussion.
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  5. Thomas Reydon (2011). Roger Sansom and Robert N. Brandon (Eds.): Integrating Evolution and Development: From Theory to Practice. Acta Biotheoretica 59 (1):81-86.score: 18.0
    Roger Sansom and Robert N. Brandon (eds.): Integrating Evolution and Development: From Theory to Practice Content Type Journal Article Pages 81-86 DOI 10.1007/s10441-010-9121-x Authors Thomas A. C. Reydon, Institute of Philosophy & Center for Philosophy and Ethics of Science (ZEWW), Leibniz Universität Hannover, Im Moore 21, 30167 Hannover, Germany Journal Acta Biotheoretica Online ISSN 1572-8358 Print ISSN 0001-5342 Journal Volume Volume 59 Journal Issue Volume 59, Number 1.
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  6. Brandon P. Turner (2010). C. L. Ten (Ed.), Mill's on Liberty: A Critical Guide (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), Pp. 243. Utilitas 22 (3):362-364.score: 12.0
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  7. C. Delancy (2008). Review: Paul Thagard (in Collaboration with Fred Kroon, Josef Nerb, Baljinder Sahdra, Cameron Shelley, and Brandon Wagner): Hot Thought: Mechanisms and Applications of Emotional Cognition. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (465):231-234.score: 12.0
  8. Robert C. Richardson (1996). Book Review:Adaptation and Environment Robert N. Brandon. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 63 (1):122-.score: 12.0
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  9. Janis Antonovics, R. M. Burian, S. Carson, G. Coper, P. S. Davies, C. Hovarth, B. D. Mishler, R. C. Richardson, S. Smith & P. H. Thrall (1994). Sober on Brandon on Screening-Off and the Levels of Selection. Philosophy of Science 61:4754486.score: 12.0
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  10. C. Fitzsimons Allison (forthcoming). History at the Virginia Theological Seminary, Alexandria, Virginia. He is the Author of Fear. Love and Worship (1962); the Rise of Moralism (1966); and Guilt, Anger and God: The Patterns of Our Discontents (1972). Owen Brandon, D. Litt. Was Formerly Rector of Fordwich, Kent and a Fellow Of. [REVIEW] Humanitas.score: 12.0
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  11. Sara L. Bagley, Carrie M. Brown, Brandon Smit & Rachel E. Tennial (forthcoming). Paul C. Reinert, SJ Center for Teaching Excellence Saint Louis University. Mind.score: 12.0
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  12. Robert C. Richardson (1996). Critical Notice: Robert N. Brandon, Adaptation and Environment. Philosophy of Science 63 (1):122-136.score: 12.0
     
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  13. Brandon C. Look (2005). Leibniz and the Shelf of Essence. The Leibniz Review 15:27-47.score: 10.0
    This paper addresses D. C. Williams’s question, “How can Leibniz know that he is a member of the actual world and not merely a possible monad on the shelf of essence?” A variety of answers are considered. Ultimately, it is argued that no particular perception of a state of affairs in the world can warrant knowledge of one’s actuality, nor can the awareness of any property within oneself; rather, it is the nature of experience itself, with the flow of perceptions, (...)
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  14. Raymond C. Barfield, Debra Brandon, Julie Thompson, Nichol Harris, Michael Schmidt & Sharron Docherty (2010). Mind the Child: Using Interactive Technology to Improve Child Involvement in Decision Making About Life-Limiting Illness. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):28 – 30.score: 9.3
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  15. Brandon C. Look (2011). Grounding the Principle of Sufficient Reason: Leibnizian Rationalism Versus the Humean Challenge. In Carlos Fraenkel, Dario Perinetti & Justin Smith (eds.), The Rationalists: Between Tradition and Revolution. Springer. 201--219.score: 8.0
    This essay examines arguments offered in support of the Principle of Sufficient Reason (PSR) by Leibniz and his followers as well as Hume's critique of the PSR. It is shown that Leibniz has a defensible argument for the PSR, whereas the arguments of his self-proclaimed followers are weak. Thus, Hume's challenge is met by Leibniz, by Wolff and Baumgarten not so much.
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  16. Brandon C. Look (2009). Leibniz and Locke on Natural Kinds. In Vlad Alexandrescu (ed.), Branching Off: The Early Moderns in Quest for the Unity of Knowledge. Zeta Books.score: 8.0
    One of the more interesting topics debated by Leibniz and Locke and one that has received comparatively little critical commentary is the nature of essences and the classification of the natural world.1 This topic, moreover, is of tremendous importance, occupying a position at the intersection of the metaphysics of individual beings, modality, epistemology, and philosophy of language. And, while it goes back to Plato, who wondered if we could cut nature at its joints, as Nicholas Jolley has pointed out, the (...)
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  17. Brandon C. Look (forthcoming). Existence, Essence, Et Expression: Leibniz Sur 'Toutes les Absurdités du Dieu de Spinoza'. In Pierre-Francois Moreau & Mogens Laerke (eds.), Spinoza et Leibniz.score: 8.0
    That Leibniz finds the philosophy of Spinoza horrifyingly wrong is obvious to anyone who reads Leibniz’s work; that Leibniz finds Spinozism so seductive that his own system is in danger of collapsing into it is less obvious but, I believe, equally true. The difference here is not so much between an exoteric and an esoteric philosophy suggested by Russell2 but between a thorough-going rationalism on the part of Spinoza and Leibniz’s “mitigated rationalism” – mitigated by the exigencies of his orthodox (...)
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  18. Roberta L. Millstein (2009). Concepts of Drift and Selection in “the Great Snail Debate” of the 1950s and Early 1960s. In Joe Cain & Michael Ruse (eds.), Descended from Darwin: Insights into the History of Evolutionary Studies, 1900-1970. American Philosophical Society.score: 8.0
    Recently, much philosophical discussion has centered on the best way to characterize the concepts of random drift and natural selection, and, in particular, whether selection and drift can be conceptually distinguished (Beatty, 1984; Brandon, 2005; Hodge, 1983, 1987; Millstein, 2002, 2005; Pfeifer, 2005; Shanahan, 1992; Stephens, 2004). These authors all contend, to a greater or lesser degree, that their concepts make sense of biological practice. So it should be instructive to see how the concepts of drift and selection were distinguished (...)
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  19. Brian Bruya (ed.) (2010). Effortless Attention: A New Perspective in the Cognitive Science of Attention and Action. MIT Press.score: 8.0
    This is the first book to explore the cognitive science of effortless attention and action. Attention and action are generally understood to require effort, and the expectation is that under normal circumstances effort increases to meet rising demand. Sometimes, however, attention and action seem to flow effortlessly despite high demand. Effortless attention and action have been documented across a range of normal activities--from rock climbing to chess playing--and yet fundamental questions about the cognitive science of effortlessness have gone largely unasked. (...)
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  20. Brandon C. Look (2007). Perfection, Power and the Passions in Spinoza and Leibniz. Revue Roumaine de la Philosophie 51 (1-2):21-38.score: 8.0
    In a short piece written most likely in the 1690s and given the title by Loemker of “On Wisdom,” Leibniz says the following: “...we see that happiness, pleasure, love, perfection, being, power, freedom, harmony, order, and beauty are all tied to each other, a truth which is rightly perceived by few.”1 Why is this? That is, why or how are these concepts tied to each other? And, why have so few understood this relation? Historians of philosophy are familiar with the (...)
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  21. Brandon C. Look, Leibniz's Modal Metaphysics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 8.0
    In the main article on Leibniz, it was claimed that Leibniz's philosophy can be seen as a reaction to the Cartesian theory of corporeal substance and the necessitarianism of Spinoza and Hobbes. This entry will address this second aspect of his philosophy. In the course of his writings, Leibniz developed an approach to questions of modality—necessity, possibility, contingency—that not only served an important function within his general metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophical theology but also has continuing interest today. Indeed, it has..
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  22. Brandon C. Look (2010). Leibniz's Metaphysics and Metametaphysics: Idealism, Realism, and the Nature of Substance. Philosophy Compass 5 (11):871-879.score: 8.0
    According to the standard view of his metaphysics, Leibniz endorses idealism: the thesis that the world is made up solely of minds or monads and their perceptual and appetitive states. Recently,this view has been challenged by some scholars, who argue that Leibniz can be seen as admitting corporeal substances, that is, animals or embodied souls, into his ontology, and that, therefore, it is false to attribute a strict idealism to him. Subtler accounts suggest that Leibniz begins his philosophical career as (...)
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  23. Brandon C. Look (2006). Some Remarks on the Ontological Arguments of Leibniz and Gödel. In Herbert Breger (ed.), Einheit in der Vielheit: Akten des VIII. Leibniz Kongresses. Hartmann.score: 8.0
    Beschäftigung mit der Philosophie, selbst wenn keine positiven Ergebnisse herauskommen (sondern ich ratlos bleibe), ist auf jeden Fall wohltätig. Es hat die Wirkung (dass „die Farbe heller“), d.h., dass die Realität deutlicher als solche erscheint. – Kurt Gödel..
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  24. Brandon C. Look (2010). Descartes on Causation – Tad Schmaltz. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (239):418-420.score: 8.0
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  25. Brandon C. Look (2010). Between Two Worlds: A Reading of Descartes's Meditations (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 104-105.score: 8.0
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  26. Brandon C. Look (2011). Kant's Thinker. Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (4):502-503.score: 8.0
    Kant’s Thinker is an excellent and important addition to the literature. In it, Patricia Kitcher aims at arriving at a comprehensive understanding of Kant’s theory of the cognitive subject. To this end, she analyzes a central component of the most notoriously difficult part of the Critique of Pure Reason, the theory of the unity of apperception in the chapter on the Transcendental Deduction of the Categories. In Kitcher’s view, the ultimate payoff of such a study is that Kant’s theory can (...)
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  27. Brandon C. Look (2007). Towards Non-Being: The Logic and Metaphysics of Intentionality - By Graham Priest. Philosophical Books 48 (1):83-84.score: 8.0
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  28. Brandon C. Look, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 8.0
    Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646–1716) was one of the great thinkers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and is known as the last “universal genius”. He made deep and important contributions to the fields of metaphysics, epistemology, logic, philosophy of religion, as well as mathematics, physics, geology, jurisprudence, and history. Even the eighteenth century French atheist and materialist Denis Diderot, whose views could not have stood in greater opposition to those of Leibniz, could not help being awed by his achievement, writing (...)
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  29. John D. Sommer, Ed Casey, Mary C. Rawlinson, Eva Kittay, Michael A. Simon, Patrick Grim, Clyde Lee Miller, Rita Nolan, Marshall Spector, Don Ihde, Peter Williams, Anthony Weston, Donn Welton, Dick Howard, David A. Dilworth, Tom Foster Digby 3d, Anthony Appiah, David Auerbach, Annette Baier, Seyla Benhabib, Akeel Bilgrami, Richard Boyd, Robert Brandon, Joshua Cohen, Arnold Davidson, Owen Flanagan, Nancy Fraser, Marcia Lind, Alexander Nehamas, Linda Nicholson, Adrian Piper, Lynne Tirrell, Lawrence Blum, Lawrence Foster, Roma Farion, Mitchel Silver, Jenifer Radden, Jack Bayne, Robert K. Shope, Jane Roland Martin, Arthur B. Millman, Beebe Nelson, Robert Rosenfeld, Janet Farrell-Smith, David E. Flesche, Daniel E. Anderson, J. R. Brown, F. Cunningham, D. Goldstick, I. Hacking, C. Normore, A. Ripstein, W. Sumner, Alison M. Jaggar, Harry Deutsch, Irving Stein, John Hund, George Englebretsen, Fred Strohm, D. L. Ouren, P. Bilimoria, F. B. D. & Nora Nevin (1993). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 66 (5):97 - 112.score: 8.0
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  30. Brandon C. Look (2005). Kant on Representation and Objectivity. Review of Metaphysics 59 (2):415-416.score: 8.0
  31. Brandon C. Look (2011). Kant's Thinker (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (4):502-503.score: 8.0
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  32. Derek D. Turner (2014). Philosophical Issues in Recent Paleontology. Philosophy Compass 9 (7):494-505.score: 8.0
    The distinction between idiographic science, which aims to reconstruct sequences of particular events, and nomothetic science, which aims to discover laws and regularities, is crucial for understanding the paleobiological revolution of the 1970s and 1980s. Stephen Jay Gould at times seemed conflicted about whether to say (a) that idiographic science is fine as it is or (b) that paleontology would have more credibility if it were more nomothetic. Ironically, one of the lasting results of the paleobiological revolution was a new (...)
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  33. Michael Inzlicht, Brandon J. Schmeichel & C. Neil Macrae (forthcoming). Why Self-Control Seems (but May Not Be) Limited. Trends in Cognitive Sciences.score: 8.0
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  34. Brandon C. Look (2006). Leibniz. The Leibniz Review 16:119-121.score: 8.0
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  35. Brandon C. Look (2007). The Four-Category Ontology: A Metaphysical Foundation for Natural Science. Review of Metaphysics 60 (3):666-668.score: 8.0
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  36. Brandon C. Look (2011). Tom Sorell , G. A. J. Rogers , and Jill Kaye , Eds. Scientia in Early Modern Philosophy: Seventeenth-Century Thinkers on Demonstrative Knowledge From First Principles . Dordrecht: Springer, 2010. Pp. Xvi+139. $139.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (2):367-371.score: 8.0
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  37. P. C. Peters Debra, T. Bestelmeyer Brandon & K. Knapp Alan (2011). Perspectives on Global Change Theory. In Samuel M. Scheiner & Michael R. Willig (eds.), The Theory of Ecology. The University of Chicago Press.score: 8.0
     
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  38. Brandon C. Look (2006). Blumenbach and Kant on Mechanism and Teleology in Nature: The Case of the Formative Drive. In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 8.0
  39. Brandon C. Look (2011). Leibniz, Kant and Frege on the Existence Predicate. In H. Breger, J. Herbst & S. Erdner (eds.), Natur und Subjekt: Akten des IX. Internationalen Leibniz-Kongresses. Hartmann.score: 8.0
    In this paper, the author examines Leibniz inconsistent treatments of the existence predicate in his formulations of the ontological argument and elsewhere. It is shown that, contrary to expectations, Leibniz at times adumbrates insights often attributed to Kant and Frege.
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  40. Brandon C. Look (2006). Leibniz: Metaphilosophy and Metaphysics, 1666-1686. [REVIEW] The Leibniz Review 15:119-121.score: 8.0
     
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  41. Gregory S. Okin, Anthony J. Parsons, John Wainwright, Jeffrey E. Herrick, Brandon T. Bestelmeyer, Debra C. Peters & Ed L. Fredrickson (2009). Do Changes in Connectivity Explain Desertification? Bioscience 59 (3):237-244.score: 8.0
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  42. Manish Saggar, Brandon G. King, Anthony P. Zanesco, Katherine A. MacLean, Stephen R. Aichele, Tonya L. Jacobs, David A. Bridwell, Phillip R. Shaver, Erika L. Rosenberg, Baljinder K. Sahdra, Emilio Ferrer, Akaysha C. Tang, George R. Mangun, B. Alan Wallace, Risto Miikkulainen & Clifford D. Saron (2012). Intensive Training Induces Longitudinal Changes in Meditation State-Related EEG Oscillatory Activity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:256-256.score: 8.0
    The capacity to focus one’s attention for an extended period of time can be increased through training in contemplative practices. However, the cognitive processes engaged during meditation that support trait changes in cognition are not well characterized. We conducted a longitudinal wait-list controlled study of intensive meditation training. Retreat participants practiced focused attention meditation techniques for three months during an initial retreat. Wait-list participants later undertook formally identical training during a second retreat. Dense-array scalp-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) data were collected during (...)
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  43. Phil Senter, LaRhonda C. Hill & Brandon J. Moton (2013). Solution to a 440-Year-Old Zoological Mystery: The Case of Aldrovandi's Dragon. Annals of Science 70 (4):1-7.score: 8.0
    Summary In his book Serpentum et Draconum Historiae Libri Duo, the sixteenth-century Italian naturalist Ulisse Aldrovandi described and illustrated an alleged dragon that had supposedly been killed in 1572. The ?dragon? became famous and was the centrepiece of Aldrovandi's museum. The specimen, a long-necked, long-tailed, scale-covered biped with a thickened torso and a forked tongue, was unlike any currently known bipedal animal and is therefore suspicious. Even so, an explicit description of its true nature has not been published before now. (...)
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  44. Robert C. Richardson (1996). The Prospects for an Evolutionary Psychology: Human Language and Human Reasoning. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 6 (4):541-557.score: 4.0
    Evolutionary psychology purports to explain human capacities as adaptations to an ancestral environment. A complete explanation of human language or human reasoning as adaptations depends on assessing an historical claim, that these capacities evolved under the pressure of natural selection and are prevalent because they provided systematic advantages to our ancestors. An outline of the character of the information needed in order to offer complete adaptation explanations is drawn from Robert Brandon (1990), and explanations offered for the evolution of language (...)
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  45. Brandon Look, On an Unpublished Manuscript of Leibniz: New Light on the Vinculum Substantiale and the Correspondence with Des Bosses.score: 4.0
    Notiones sunt Entium, aut Respectuum. Entia sunt Res aut Modi. Res sunt substantiae aut phaenomenae. Substantiae sunt vel simplices vel compositae. Substantia simplex est Monas; Monas autem est vel primitiva Deus, a quo omnia; vel derivativa. Et ha[e]c vel perceptiva tantum, vel etiam sensitiva; et haec vel sensitiva tantum vel etiam intellectiva quae et spiritus appellatur. Rursus Monas vel est Anima corporis vel est separata; haec vel creata (ut plerique volunt etsi ego an creata sint monades corporis complures dubito) vel (...)
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  46. D. Turner (2000). The Functions of Fossils: Inference and Explanation in Functional Morphology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 31 (1):193-212.score: 4.0
    This paper offers an account of the relationship between inference and explanation in functional morphology which combines Robert Brandon's theory of adaptation explanation with standard accounts of inference to the best explanation. Inferences of function from structure, it is argued, are inferences to the best adaptation explanation. There are, however, three different approaches to the problem of determining which adaptation explanation is the best. The theory of inference to the best adaptation explanation is then applied to a case study from (...)
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  47. Thomas C. Kane, Robert C. Richardson & Daniel W. Fong (1990). The Phenotype as the Level of Selection: Cave Organisms as Model Systems. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:151 - 164.score: 4.0
    Selection operates at many levels. Robert Brandon has distinguished the question of the level of selection from the unit of selection, arguing that the phenotype is commonly the target of selection, whatever the unit of selection might be. He uses "screening off" as a criterion for distinguishing the level of selection. Cave animals show a common morphological pattern which includes hypertrophy of some structures and reduction or loss of others. In a study of a cave dwelling crustacean, Gammarus minus, (...)
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