Search results for 'Ambivalence' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. After Decades Of Ambivalence (2000). Sadie Plant. In Gill Kirkup (ed.), The Gendered Cyborg: A Reader. Routledge in Association with the Open University
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  2. J. Allan Hobson & I. Ambivalence (2005). Simulation, or Hybrid? In Christopher Grau (ed.), Philosophers Explore the Matrix. Oxford University Press 177.
     
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  3.  40
    Hili Razinsky (2015). A Live Language: Concreteness, Openness, Ambivalence. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 15 (43):51-65.
    Wittgenstein has shown that that life, in the sense that applies in the first place to human beings, is inherently linguistic. In this paper, I ask what is involved in language, given that it is thus essential to life, answering that language – or concepts – must be both alive and the ground for life. This is explicated by a Wittgensteinian series of entailments of features. According to the first feature, concepts are not intentional engagements. The second feature brings life (...)
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  4.  45
    Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo (2013). From Dualism to the Preservation of Ambivalence. Hans Jonas’ “Ontological Revolution” as the Background to His Ethics of Responsibility. In Catherine Larrère Eric Pommier (ed.), L'étique de la vie chez Hans Jonas. Publications de la Sorbonne
    An attempt to achieve an overall interpretation of the thinking of Hans Jonas by utilising the notions of life, ambivalence and responsibility.
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  5.  36
    Matthew Kearnes & Brian Wynne (2007). On Nanotechnology and Ambivalence: The Politics of Enthusiasm. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 1 (2):131-142.
    The promise of scientific and technological innovation – particularly in fields such as nanotechnology – is increasingly set against what has been articulated as a deficit in public trust in both the new technologies and regulatory mechanisms. Whilst the development of new technology is cast as providing contributions to both quality of life and national competitiveness, what has been termed a ‘legitimacy crisis’ is seen as threatening the vitality of this process. However in contrast to the risk debates that dominated (...)
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  6. Simon D. Feldman & Allan Hazlett, In Defense of Ambivalence.
    Harry Frankfurt (1988, 1998, 2004) defends an ethical ideal of wholeheartedness. We follow Frankfurt in distinguishing between ambivalence (a species of incoherence in desire) and wholeheartedness (the absence of ambivalence), but part ways with him by arguing against the idea that wholeheartedness is an ethical ideal. Our argument is based on cases of ethically valuable ambivalence – cases in which ambivalence contributes to the wellbeing of the ambivalent person.
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  7. J. S. Swindell Blumenthal-Barby (2010). Ambivalence. Philosophical Explorations 13 (1):23 – 34.
    The phenomenon of ambivalence is an important one for any philosophy of action. Despite this importance, there is a lack of a fully satisfactory analysis of the phenomenon. Although many contemporary philosophers recognize the phenomenon, and address topics related to it, only Harry Frankfurt has given the phenomenon full treatment in the context of action theory - providing an analysis of how it relates to the structure and freedom of the will. In this paper, I develop objections to Frankfurt's (...)
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  8.  17
    Hein Te Velde, Noelle Aarts & Cees Van Woerkum (2002). Dealing with Ambivalence: Farmers' and Consumers' Perceptions of Animal Welfare in Livestock Breeding. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 15 (2):203-219.
    The results of an empirical study intoperceptions of the treatment of farm animals inthe Netherlands are presented. A qualitativeapproach, based on in-depth interviews withmeat livestock farmers and consumers was chosenin order to assess motivations behindperceptions and to gain insight into the waypeople deal with possible discrepancies betweentheir perceptions and their daily practices.Perceptions are analyzed with the help of aframe of reference, which consists ofvalues, norms, convictions, interests, andknowledge.The perceptions of the interviewed farmersare quite consistent and without exceptionpositive: according to them, (...)
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  9.  3
    Agustín Vicente & Agustín Arrieta (forthcoming). Moral Ambivalence, Relativism, and Pluralism. Acta Analytica:1-17.
    David Wong has introduced the notion of moral ambivalence in the philosophical debate. In this paper, we focus on the nature of moral ambivalence and on its interpretation. We hold that moral ambivalence is not a phenomenon that provides evidence for relativism, as Wong claims, and as relativism is usually understood. Rather, ambivalence denotes a pluralist attitude, an attitude characterized by the thought that two different, even incompatible, courses of action can both be permissible when considered (...)
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  10.  23
    Silke Schicktanz (2006). Ethical Considerations of the Human–Animal-Relationship Under Conditions of Asymmetry and Ambivalence. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (1):7-16.
    Ethical reflection deals not only with the moral standing and handling of animals, it should also include a critical analysis of the underlying relationship. Anthropological, psychological, and sociological aspects of the human–animal-relationship should be taken into account. Two conditions, asymmetry and ambivalence, are taken as the historical and empirical basis for reflections on the human–animal-relationship in late modern societies. These conditions explain the variety of moral practice, apart from paradoxes, and provide a framework to systematize animal ethical problems in (...)
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  11.  35
    Logi Gunnarsson (2014). In Defense of Ambivalence and Alienation. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (1):13-26.
    In this paper, I argue against certain dogmas about ambivalence and alienation. Authors such as Harry Frankfurt and Christine Korsgaard demand a unity of persons that excludes ambivalence. Other philosophers such as David Velleman have criticized this demand as overblown, yet these critics, too, demand a personal unity that excludes an extreme form of ambivalence (“radical ambivalence”). I defend radical ambivalence by arguing that, to be true to oneself, one sometimes needs to be radically ambivalent. (...)
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  12.  15
    Amelie Rorty (2014). The Ethics of Collaborative Ambivalence. Journal of Ethics 18 (4):391-403.
    We are all ambivalent at every turn. “Should I skip class on this gorgeous spring day?” “Do I really want to marry Eric?” Despite being uncomfortable and unsettling, there are some forms of ambivalence that are appropriate and responsible. Even when they seem trivial and superficial, they reveal some of our deepest values, the self-images we would like to project. In this paper, I analyze collaborative ambivalence, the kind of ambivalence that arises from our identity-forming close relationships. (...)
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  13.  9
    Yigal Bronner (2010). The Poetics of Ambivalence: Imagining and Unimagining the Political in Bilhaṇa's Vikramāṅkadevacarita. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (5):457-483.
    There is something quite deceptive about Bilhaṇa’s Vikramāṅkadevacarita , one of the most popular and oft-quoted works of the Sanskrit canon. The poem conforms perfectly to the stipulations of the mahākāvya genre: it is replete with descriptions of bravery in battle and amorous plays with beautiful women; its language is intensified by a powerful arsenal of ornaments and images; and it portrays its main hero, King Vikramāṅka VI of the Cāḷukya dynasty (r. 1076–1126), as an equal of Rāma. At the (...)
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  14.  3
    Michael S. Roth (2009). Photographic Ambivalence and Historical Consciousness. History and Theory 48 (4):82-94.
    This essay focuses on three topics that arose at the Photography and Historical Interpretation conference: photography’s incapacity to conceive duration; photography and the “rim of ontological uncertainty;” photography’s “anthropological revolution.” In the late nineteenth century, blindness to duration was conceptualized as the cost of photographic precision. Since the late twentieth century, blindness to our own desires, or inauthenticity, has been underlined as the price of photographic ubiquity. These forms of blindness, however, are not so much disabilities to be overcome as (...)
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  15.  3
    Simonetta Tabboni (2007). De l'ambivalence sociale à l'ambivalence culturelle. Cahiers Internationaux de Sociologie 123 (2):269.
    La sociologie classique a utilisé la notion d’ambivalence sociale pour désigner la combinaison, nécessaire, mais chargée de conflit, entre l’obéissance aux normes et la volonté d’affirmer sa liberté. Il faut distinguer cette notion de celle d’ambivalence culturelle, qui désigne la nécessité de suivre à la fois des exigences culturelles opposées, en particulier dans un rapport majorité/minorité. La figure de l’étranger dessinée par Georg Simmel est l’exemple type de cette ambivalence, source de frustrations, mais qui néanmoins représente la (...)
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  16.  10
    Hanneke J. Nijland, Noelle M. C. Aarts & Reint Jan Renes (2013). Frames and Ambivalence in Context: An Analysis of Hands-On Experts' Perception of the Welfare of Animals in Traveling Circuses in The Netherlands. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (3):523-535.
    The results of an empirical study into the perceptions of “hands-on” experts concerning the welfare of (non-human) animals in traveling circuses in the Netherlands are presented. A qualitative approach, based on in-depth conversations with trainers/performers, former trainers/performers, veterinarians, and an owner of an animal shelter, conveyed several patterns in the contextual construction of perceptions and the use of dissonance reduction strategies. Perceptions were analyzed with the help of the Symbolic Convergence Theory and the model of the frame of reference, consisting (...)
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  17.  4
    Jonathan K. Crane (2011). Torturous Ambivalence: Judaic Struggles with Torture. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):598-605.
    A surprising lack of consensus exists among contemporary Jewish scholars about Judaism's position vis-à-vis torture. Some claim that Judaism condones torture while others insist that Judaism condemns it. These diverging opinions on such a troubling practice suggest an ambivalence deep within the Judaic textual tradition about torturing bodies. This brief essay critiques both perspectives for twisting the textual tradition and offers some preliminary suggestions for a more robust Judaic approach to torture.
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  18.  8
    Hein Te Velde, Noelle Aarts & Cees van Woerkum (2002). Dealing with Ambivalence: Farmers' and Consumers' Perceptions of Animal Welfare in Livestock Breeding. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 15 (2):203-219.
    The results of an empirical study intoperceptions of the treatment of farm animals inthe Netherlands are presented. A qualitativeapproach, based on in-depth interviews withmeat livestock farmers and consumers was chosenin order to assess motivations behindperceptions and to gain insight into the waypeople deal with possible discrepancies betweentheir perceptions and their daily practices.Perceptions are analyzed with the help of aframe of reference, which consists ofvalues, norms, convictions, interests, andknowledge.
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  19. Barry Smart (1999). Facing Modernity: Ambivalence, Reflexivity, and Morality. Sage Publications.
    `In the grand tradition of classical social theory, Barry Smart challenges us to face up to the ambivalences of the contemporary moment and to take responsibility for our individual and social existence' - Douglas Kellner, University of California, Los Angeles ` a brilliant excursus through modern social theory, Smart’s book should be read and re-read for its careful analysis of the dilemmas of morality in postmodernism' - Bryan S. Turner, Deakin University Through a critical discussion of the 'ambivalent fruits' of (...)
     
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  20.  41
    Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo (2015). The Heuristics of Fear: Can the Ambivalence of Fear Teach Us Anything in the Technological Age? Ethics in Progress 6 (1).
    The paper assumes that fear presents a certain degree of ambivalence. To say it with Hans Jonas (1903-1993), fear is not only a negative emotion, but may teach us something very important: we recognize what is relevant when we perceive that it is at stake. Under this respect, fear may be assumed as a guide to responsibility, a virtue that is becoming increasingly important, because of the role played by human technology in the current ecological crisis. Secondly, fear and (...)
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  21.  35
    Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo (2015). The Heuristics of Fear: Can the Ambivalence of Fear Teach Us Anything in the Technological Age? Ethics in Progress 6 (1).
    The paper assumes that fear presents a certain degree of ambivalence. To say it with Hans Jonas (1903-1993), fear is not only a negative emotion, but may teach us something very important: we recognize what is relevant when we perceive that it is at stake. Under this respect, fear may be assumed as a guide to responsibility, a virtue that is becoming increasingly important, because of the role played by human technology in the current ecological crisis. Secondly, fear and (...)
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  22. David Carr (2009). Virtue, Mixed Emotions and Moral Ambivalence. Philosophy 84 (1):31-46.
    Aristotelian virtue ethics invests emotions and feelings with much moral significance. However, the moral and other conflicts that inevitably beset human life often give rise to states of emotional division and ambivalence with problematic implications for any understanding of virtue as complete psychic unity of character and conduct. For one thing, any admission that the virtuous are prey to conflicting passions and desires may seem to threaten the crucial virtue ethical distinction between the virtuous and the continent. One recent (...)
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  23.  10
    Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo (2015). The Heuristics of Fear: Can the Ambivalence of Fear Teach Us Anything in the Technological Age? Ethics in Progress 6 (1).
    The paper assumes that fear presents a certain degree of ambivalence. To say it with Hans Jonas (1903-1993), fear is not only a negative emotion, but may teach us something very important: we recognize what is relevant when we perceive that it is at stake. Under this respect, fear may be assumed as a guide to responsibility, a virtue that is becoming increasingly important, because of the role played by human technology in the current ecological crisis. Secondly, fear and (...)
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  24.  87
    Hili Razinsky (2014). An Outline for Ambivalence of Value Judgment. Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (3):469-488.
    Ambivalence of Value JudgmentAmbivalence, in the central cases to be discussed here, can be formulated as the holding of opposed mental attitudes – and in particular opposed value judgments – towards the same object. Many philosophers believe that ambivalence is strictly impossible. Others allow ambivalence, but only as a subjective attitude that does not reveal anything about the logic of the propositions judged, whereas in so far as these propositions themselves are concerned, any conflict is resolvable. On (...)
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  25.  3
    F. Callard (2014). Psychiatric Diagnosis: The Indispensability of Ambivalence. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (8):526-530.
    The author analyses how debate over the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders has tended to privilege certain conceptions of psychiatric diagnosis over others, as well as to polarise positions regarding psychiatric diagnosis. The article aims to muddy the black and white tenor of many discussions regarding psychiatric diagnosis by moving away from the preoccupation with diagnosis as classification and refocusing attention on diagnosis as a temporally and spatially complex, as well as highly mediated process. (...)
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  26.  5
    Birgit Boogaard, Bettina Bock, Simon Oosting, Johannes Wiskerke & Akke van der Zijpp (2011). Social Acceptance of Dairy Farming: The Ambivalence Between the Two Faces of Modernity. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (3):259-282.
    Society’s relationship with modern animal farming is an ambivalent one: on the one hand there is rising criticism about modern animal farming; on the other hand people appreciate certain aspects of it, such as increased food safety and low food prices. This ambivalence reflects the two faces of modernity: the negative (exploitation of nature and loss of traditions) and the positive (progress, convenience, and efficiency). This article draws on a national survey carried out in the Netherlands that aimed at (...)
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  27.  7
    Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo (2015). The Heuristics of Fear: Can the Ambivalence of Fear Teach Us Anything in the Technological Age? Ethics in Progress 6 (1).
    The paper assumes that fear presents a certain degree of ambivalence. To say it with Hans Jonas (1903-1993), fear is not only a negative emotion, but may teach us something very important: we recognize what is relevant when we perceive that it is at stake. Under this respect, fear may be assumed as a guide to responsibility, a virtue that is becoming increasingly important, because of the role played by human technology in the current ecological crisis. Secondly, fear and (...)
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  28.  68
    Laura W. Ekstrom (2010). Ambivalence and Authentic Agency. Ratio 23 (4):374-392.
    It is common to believe that some of our concerns are deeper concerns of ours than are others and that some of our attitudes are central rather than peripheral to our psychological identity. What is the best approach to characterizing depth or centrality to the self? This paper addresses the matter of the depth and authenticity of attitudes and the relation of this matter to the autonomy of action. It defends a conception of the real self in terms of preferences (...)
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  29.  12
    Clare Shelley-Egan (2010). The Ambivalence of Promising Technology. NanoEthics 4 (2):183-189.
    Issues of responsibility in the world of nanotechnology are becoming explicit with the emergence of a discourse on ‘responsible development’ of nanoscience and nanotechnologies. Much of this discourse centres on the ambivalences of nanotechnology and of promising technology in general. Actors must find means of dealing with these ambivalences. Actors’ actions and responses to ambivalence are shaped by their position and context, along with strategic games they are involved in, together with other actors. A number of interviews were conducted (...)
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  30.  2
    J. S. Swindell (2010). Ambivalence. Philosophical Explorations 13 (1):23-34.
    The phenomenon of ambivalence is an important one for any philosophy of action. Despite this importance, there is a lack of a fully satisfactory analysis of the phenomenon. Although many contemporary philosophers recognize the phenomenon, and address topics related to it, only Harry Frankfurt has given the phenomenon full treatment in the context of action theory - providing an analysis of how it relates to the structure and freedom of the will. In this paper, I develop objections to Frankfurt's (...)
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  31. Karl E. Peters (2003). Pluralism and Ambivalence in the Evolution of Morality. Zygon 38 (2):333-354.
    Much good work has been done on the evolution of human morality by focusing on how “selfish genes‘ can give rise to altruistic human beings. A richer research program is needed, however, to take into account the ambivalence of naturally evolved biopsychological motivators and the historical pluralism of human morality in religious systems. Such a program is described here. A first step is to distinguish the ultimate cause of natural selection from proximate causes that are the results of natural (...)
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  32.  3
    Kenneth Weisbrode (2012). On Ambivalence: The Problems and Pleasures of Having It Both Ways. The MIT Press.
    Why is it so hard to make up our minds? Adam and Eve set the template: Do we or don't we eat the apple? They chose, half-heartedly, and nothing was ever the same again. With this book, Kenneth Weisbrode offers a crisp, literate, and provocative introduction to the age-old struggle with ambivalence. Ambivalence results from a basic desire to have it both ways. This is only natural--although insisting upon it against all reason often results not in "both" but (...)
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  33.  40
    David Svolba (2011). Swindell, Frankfurt, and Ambivalence. Philosophical Explorations 14 (2):219 - 225.
    J.S. Swindell has argued that Harry Frankfurt's analysis of ambivalence is ambiguous and that it fails to do justice to the full range of this psychological phenomenon. Building on her criticism of Frankfurt, Swindell offers an analysis of ambivalence which is supposed to clarify ambiguities in Frankfurt's analysis and reveal varieties of ambivalence that Frankfurt's analysis allegedly overlooks. In this brief reply, I argue that Frankfurt's analysis of ambivalence is neither ambiguous nor objectionably narrow. I conclude (...)
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  34.  35
    Paul M. Hughes (2006). Ambivalence, Autonomy, and Organ Sales. Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (2):237-251.
    Recent philosophical arguments in favor of legal markets in human organs such as kidneys claim that respect for autonomy justifies such markets. I argue that these arguments fail to establish the moral permissibility of commercialized organ sales because they do not show that those most likely to serve as vendors would choose to sell autonomously. Pro-market views utilize hierarchical theories of autonomy to demonstrate that potential organ vendors may autonomously consent to selling their organs even in the absence of any (...)
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  35.  24
    Jacqui Poltera (2011). Is Ambivalence an Agential Vice? Philosophical Explorations 13 (3):293-305.
    This paper takes as its starting point a debate between Harry Frankfurt and J. David Velleman. Frankfurt argues that we need to resolve ambivalence since it necessarily threatens autonomy. Velleman challenges this claim, arguing that a desire to resolve ambivalence threatens autonomy when it prompts repression. I argue that the relationship between ambivalence and autonomy is more ambiguous than either theorist tends to acknowledge. In doing so, I recommend three features relevant for assessing whether or not (...) threatens autonomy. (shrink)
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  36.  10
    Steve Harrist (2006). A Phenomenological Investigation of the Experience of Ambivalence. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 37 (1):85-114.
    Ambivalence, broadly defined as feeling more than one emotion at a time, is thought to be a central aspect of human experience and to play an important role in a range of psychological processes. Ambivalence is experienced in close relationships, identity development, social and political attitudes, decision-making behavior, anxiety states, as well as in psychotherapeutic change. Eight under-graduate students participated in phenomenological interviews that were transcribed and served as the basis for the investigation. The primary purpose of this (...)
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  37.  25
    Barry Lam (2013). Vagueness and Ambivalence. Acta Analytica 28 (3):359-379.
    What is the proper attitude toward what is expressed by a vague sentence in the face of borderline evidence? Some call this attitude “ambivalence” and distinguish it from uncertainty. It has been argued that Classical Epistemicism conjoined with classical probability theory fails to characterize this attitude, and that we must therefore abandon classical logic or classical probabilities in the presence of vagueness. In this paper, I give a characterization of ambivalence assuming a supervaluationist semantics for vague terms that (...)
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  38.  67
    Andreas De Block & Pieter Adriaens (2004). Darwinizing Sexual Ambivalence: A New Evolutionary Hypothesis of Male Homosexuality. Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):59 – 76.
    At first sight, homosexuality has little to do with reproduction. Nevertheless, many neo-Darwinian theoreticians think that human homosexuality may have had a procreative value, since it enabled the close kin of homosexuals to have more viable offspring than individuals lacking the support of homosexual siblings. In this article, however, we will defend an alternative hypothesis - originally put forward by Freud in "A phylogenetic phantasy" - namely that homosexuality evolved as a means to strengthen social bonds. Consequently, from an evolutionary (...)
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  39.  60
    John Milbank (2007). The Return of Mediation, or the Ambivalence of Alain Badiou. Angelaki 12 (1):127 – 143.
    (2007). The Return of Mediation, or The Ambivalence of Alain Badiou. Angelaki: Vol. 12, the political and the infinite theology and radical politics, pp. 127-143.
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  40.  3
    James Campbell (2002). The Ambivalence Toward Teaching in the Early Years of the American Philosophical Association. Teaching Philosophy 25 (1):53-68.
    This paper investigates whether philosophers ever regarded the teaching of philosophy as a central concern by considering the first decades of professional associations that ultimately merged into the American Philosophical Association . Before the APA, philosophical education was mostly devoted to the development of the Christian gentleman. Upon its founding, the APA’s first president took the central functions of the APA to promote original investigation, publication, and collaboration, rather than teaching. Despite Creighton’s position that teaching should not play a role (...)
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  41.  10
    A. Breitholtz, I. Snellman & I. Fagerberg (2013). Carers' Ambivalence in Conflict Situations with Older Persons. Nursing Ethics 20 (2):0969733012455566.
    The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of professional carers’ experiences in caring situations when a conflict of interest arises with the older person receiving care. The findings reveal the complexity of the carers’ ambivalence when facing a conflict of interest, weighing up between the older persons’ right to self-determination and external demands. The carers are alone in their ambivalence, and the conclusion is that they need help and support to be more present in the (...)
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  42.  15
    Niclas Månsson & Elisabet Langmann (2011). Facing Ambivalence in Education: A Strange(R's) Hope? Ethics and Education 6 (1):15 - 25.
    This article explores how our understanding of ambivalence would shift if we saw it as an inherent and essential part of the ordinary work of education. Following Bauman's sociology of the stranger and Derrida's deconstructions of hospitality, the article unfolds in three parts. In the first part we discuss the preconditions of modern education which since the Enlightenment has been guided by the postulate that there is and ought to be a rational order in the social world. In the (...)
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  43.  5
    Thomas Brockelman (2007). Polemical Ambivalence: Modernity and Utopia in |[Zcaron]|I|[Zcaron]|Ek's The Puppet and the Dwarf. Contemporary Political Theory 6 (3):272.
    Beginning from the hypothesis that Slavoj iek's recent 'theological' writing really concerns issues in political theory — historicity, modernity and freedom — 'polemical ambivalence' uses a fundamental structural ambiguity in his recent book, The Puppet and Dwarf, to interpret his larger project as split about the utopian aspect of modernity. The Puppet and the Dwarf is riven by modernity, with the text's central argument demonstrating the importance of the modern perspective but with the framing material demanding that we reverse (...)
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  44.  7
    Anita Kim (2014). The Curious Case of Self‐Interest: Inconsistent Effects and Ambivalence Toward a Widely Accepted Construct. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (1):99-122.
    Self-interest is widely accepted as a powerful motivator by both academics and laypeople alike. However, research surrounding the self-interest motive paints a complicated picture of this most important psychological construct. Additionally, research on the social desirability of self-interest has revealed that despite its widespread acceptance, people do not readily accept that self-interest drives their own behaviors. This paper reviews the literature on self-interest and reveals several curious features surrounding its actual effect on helping behaviors, political attitudes and voting, and people's (...)
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  45.  13
    K. Boogaard Birgit, B. Bock Bettina, J. Oosting Simon, S. C. Wiskerke Johannes & J. der Zijpp Akkvane (forthcoming). Social Acceptance of Dairy Farming: The Ambivalence Between the Two Faces of Modernity. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics.
    Society’s relationship with modern animal farming is an ambivalent one: on the one hand there is rising criticism about modern animal farming; on the other hand people appreciate certain aspects of it, such as increased food safety and low food prices. This ambivalence reflects the two faces of modernity: the negative (exploitation of nature and loss of traditions) and the positive (progress, convenience, and efficiency). This article draws on a national survey carried out in the Netherlands that aimed at (...)
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  46.  1
    David Newheiser (2010). Ambivalence in Dionysius the Areopagite: The Limitations of a Liturgical Reading. In J. Baun, A. Cameron, M. Edwards & M. Vinzent (eds.), Studia Patristica XLVIII. Peeters
    A growing number of scholars claim that the significance of the Corpus Areopagiticum is determined by an ecclesiastical context. When Dionysius demands the negation of every symbol in The Mystical Theology, Andrew Louth and Alexander Golitzin argue that this simply refers to the Christian liturgy. Yet although this reading has helped correct the tendency to reduce the Corpus to a manual for abstracted dogmatics, it obscures Dionysius's often radical negativity. On the one hand, Dionysius sometimes suggests that union with God (...)
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  47.  9
    J. Nijland Hanneke, M. C. Aarts Noelle & Reint Jan Renes (forthcoming). Frames and Ambivalence in Context: An Analysis of Hands-on Experts' Perception of the Welfare of Animals in Traveling Circuses in the Netherlands. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics.
    The results of an empirical study into the perceptions of “hands-on” experts concerning the welfare of (non-human) animals in traveling circuses in the Netherlands are presented. A qualitative approach, based on in-depth conversations with trainers/performers, former trainers/performers, veterinarians, and an owner of an animal shelter, conveyed several patterns in the contextual construction of perceptions and the use of dissonance reduction strategies. Perceptions were analyzed with the help of the Symbolic Convergence Theory and the model of the frame of reference, consisting (...)
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  48.  4
    Anne-Lise Rey (2011). L'ambivalence de la notion d'action dans la Dynamique de Leibniz: la correspondance entre Leibniz et De Volder. Studia Leibnitiana 41 (2 (2009)):47-66.
    The object of the first part of this paper is to establish the relationships which Leibniz establishes between metaphysical action and dynamic action, in the light of how he elaborates the concept of dynamic action in the texts from the years 1689-90 and in particular of Dynamica de potentia. Once the interdependence of these two notions is revealed, the ambivalence of action can be seen as a means to a new understanding, based on the Dynamics, of the relationships between (...)
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    Jon A. Shields (2011). Almost Human: Ambivalence in the Pro-Choice and Pro-Life Movements. Critical Review 23 (4):495-515.
    Abstract Scholars find that political elites are badly polarized over a large range of policy issues, but they tend to agree that the mass public is much more ambivalent. The abortion war in particular is regarded as one in which millions of ambivalent citizens are caught in the crossfire of polarized activists. Yet even abortion activists struggle to escape the very ambivalent sentiments that plague ordinary Americans. These common sentiments even exert a moderating influence on both movements in ways that (...)
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    Tilman Schiel (2005). Modernity, Ambivalence and the Gardening State. Thesis Eleven 83 (1):78-89.
    This contribution attempts to show the ‘universality’ of Zygmunt Bauman’s concept of ‘modernity and ambivalence’. First it tries to explain the new feeling of insecurity and fear after the end of the Cold War: we have lost our intimate enemy, communism, and got ‘alien’ Islamism instead. Further, it is argued that ‘exotic’ modernity (from a Eurocentric perspective) is also in fear of ambivalence, as demonstrated by Sinophobia in Indonesia. The conclusion is that a ‘postmodern’ accommodation of ambivalence (...)
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