Search results for 'Amnesia' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kathy Behrendt (2010). Scraping Down the Past: Memory and Amnesia in W. G. Sebald's Anti-Narrative. Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):394-408.
    Vanguard anti-narrativist Galen Strawson declares personal memory unimportant for self-constitution. But what if lapses of personal memory are sustained by a morally reprehensible amnesia about historical events, as happens in the work of W.G. Sebald? The importance of memory cannot be downplayed in such cases. Nevertheless, contrary to expectations, a concern for memory needn’t ally one with the narrativist position. Recovery of historical and personal memory results in self-dissolution and not self-unity or understanding in Sebald’s characters. In the end, (...)
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  2. John P. Aggleton & Malcolm W. Brown (1999). Episodic Memory, Amnesia, and the Hippocampal–Anterior Thalamic Axis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):425-444.
    By utilizing new information from both clinical and experimental (lesion, electrophysiological, and gene-activation) studies with animals, the anatomy underlying anterograde amnesia has been reformulated. The distinction between temporal lobe and diencephalic amnesia is of limited value in that a common feature of anterograde amnesia is damage to part of an comprising the hippocampus, the fornix, the mamillary bodies, and the anterior thalamic nuclei. This view, which can be traced back to Delay and Brion (1969), differs from other (...)
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  3.  67
    Christoph Hoerl (1999). Memory, Amnesia, and the Past. Mind and Language 14 (2):227-51.
    This paper defends the claim that, in order to have a concept of time, subjects must have memories of particular events they once witnessed. Some patients with severe amnesia arguably still have a concept of time. Two possible explanations of their grasp of this concept are discussed. They take as their respective starting points abilities preserved in the patients in question: (1) the ability to retain factual information over time despite being unable to recall the past event or situation (...)
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  4.  20
    Vanessa Carbonell (2014). Amnesia, Anesthesia, and Warranted Fear. Bioethics 28 (5):245-254.
    Is a painful experience less bad for you if you will not remember it? Do you have less reason to fear it? These questions bear on how we think about medical procedures and surgeries that use an anesthesia regimen that leaves patients conscious – and potentially in pain – but results in complete ‘drug-induced amnesia’ after the fact. I argue that drug-induced amnesia does not render a painful medical procedure a less fitting object of fear, and thus the (...)
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  5.  1
    Giovanna Leone & Mauro Sarrica (2012). When Ownership Hurts: Remembering the in-Group Wrongdoings After a Long Lasting Collective Amnesia. Human Affairs 22 (4):603-612.
    This study explores the effects of two different kinds of text addressed to young Italian students, which convey past in-group war-crimes either in a detailed or in an evasive way. After completing a first questionnaire a sample of Italian university students read two versions of a same historical text on Italian invasion of Ethiopia . The results show that participants reading a detailed text feel react more emotionally and feel more involved. However, the more negative reactions linked to the detailed (...)
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  6.  14
    Nicholas P. Spanos (1986). Hypnotic Behavior: A Social-Psychological Interpretation of Amnesia, Analgesia, and “Trance Logic”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):449.
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  7.  6
    Suparna Rajaram, Maryellen Hamilton & Anthony Bolton (2002). Distinguishing States of Awareness From Confidence During Retrieval: Evidence From Amnesia. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience 2 (3):227-235.
  8.  11
    Klemens Gutbrod, Claudine Krouzel, Helene Hofer, René Müri, Walter J. Perrig & Radek Ptak (2006). Decision-Making in Amnesia: Do Advantageous Decisions Require Conscious Knowledge of Previous Behavioural Choices? Neuropsychologia 44 (8):1315-1324.
  9.  6
    Douglas K. Detterman & Norman R. Ellis (1972). Determinants of Induced Amnesia in Short-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (2):308.
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  10.  1
    William H. Saufley Jr & Eugene Winograd (1970). Retrograde Amnesia and Priority Instructions in Free Recall. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (1):150.
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  11.  3
    M. E. Bitterman & F. L. Marcuse (1945). Autonomic Response in Posthypnotic Amnesia. Journal of Experimental Psychology 35 (3):248.
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  12.  35
    Alessandra Tanesini, Collective Amnesia and Epistemic Injustice.
    Alessandra Tanesini is a Professor of Philosophy at Cardiff University working on epistemology and philosophy of language. In this post she summarises some of her recent work on collective amnesia and epistemic injustice.
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  13.  61
    Kevin T. Kelly (1999). Iterated Belief Revision, Reliability, and Inductive Amnesia. Erkenntnis 50 (1):11-58.
    Belief revision theory concerns methods for reformulating an agent's epistemic state when the agent's beliefs are refuted by new information. The usual guiding principle in the design of such methods is to preserve as much of the agent's epistemic state as possible when the state is revised. Learning theoretic research focuses, instead, on a learning method's reliability or ability to converge to true, informative beliefs over a wide range of possible environments. This paper bridges the two perspectives by assessing the (...)
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  14.  15
    Jean Curthoys (1997). Feminist Amnesia: The Wake of Women's Liberation. Routledge.
    Feminist Amnesia is an important challenge to contemporary academic feminism. Jean Curthoys argues that the intellectual decline of university arts education and the loss of a deep moral commitment in feminism are related phenomena. The contradiction set up by the radical ideas of the 1960s, and institutionalised life of many of its protagonists in the academy, has produced a special kind of intellectual distortion. This book criticizes current trends in feminist theory from the perspective of forgotten and allegedly outdated (...)
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  15.  25
    Angelica Staniloiu, Hans J. Markowitsch & Matthias Brand (2010). Psychogenic Amnesia – A Malady of the Constricted Self☆. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (3):778-801.
    Autobiographical–episodic memory is the conjunction of subjective time, autonoetic consciousness and the experiencing self. Understanding the neural correlates of autobiographical–episodic memory might therefore be essential for shedding light on the neurobiology underlying the experience of being an autonoetic self. In this contribution we illustrate the intimate relationship between autobiographical–episodic memory and self by reviewing the clinical and neuropsychological features and brain functional imaging correlates of psychogenic amnesia – a condition that is usually characterized by severely impaired retrograde memory functioning, (...)
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  16.  23
    Mary R. Harvey & Judith Lewis Herman (1994). Amnesia, Partial Amnesia, and Delayed Recall Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):295-306.
    Clinical experience suggests that adult survivors of childhood trauma arrive at their memories in a number of ways, with varying degrees of associated distress and uncertainty and, in some cases, after memory lapses of varying duration and extent. Among those patients who enter psychotherapy as a result of early abuse, three general patterns of traumatic recall are identified: relatively continuous and complete recall of childhood abuse experiences coupled with changing interpretations of these experiences, partial amnesia for abuse events, accompanied (...)
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  17.  16
    M. L. Peters, S. A. Uyterlinde, J. Consemulder & O. van der Hart (1998). Apparent Amnesia on Experimental Memory Tests in Dissociative Identity Disorder: An Exploratory Study. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (1):27-41.
    Dissociative identity disorder (DID; called multiple personality disorder in DSMIII-R) is a psychiatric condition in which two or more identity states recurrently take control of the person's behavior. A characteristic feature of DID is the occurrence of apparently severe amnestic symptoms. This paper is concerned with experimental research of memory function in DID and focuses on between-identity transfer of newly learned neutral material. Previous studies on this subject are reviewed and a pilot study with four subjects is described. This study (...)
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  18.  26
    Jennifer J. Freyd (1994). Betrayal Trauma: Traumatic Amnesia as an Adaptive Response to Childhood Abuse. Ethics and Behavior 4 (4):307 – 329.
    Betrayal trauma theory suggests that psychogenic amnesia is an adaptive response to childhood abuse. When a parent or other powerful figure violates a fundamental ethic of human relationships, victims may need to remain unaware of the trauma not to reduce suffering but rather to promote survival. Amnesia enables the child to maintain an attachment with a figure vital to survival, development, and thriving. Analysis of evolutionary pressures, mental modules, social cognitions, and developmental needs suggests that the degree to (...)
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  19.  18
    Rafaële J. C. Huntjens, Albert Postma, Liesbeth Woertman, Onno van Der Hart & Madelon L. Peters (2005). Procedural Memory in Dissociative Identity Disorder: When Can Inter-Identity Amnesia Be Truly Established?☆. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (2):377-389.
    In a serial reaction time task, procedural memory was examined in Dissociative Identity Disorder . Thirty-one DID patients were tested for inter-identity transfer of procedural learning and their memory performance was compared with 25 normal controls and 25 controls instructed to simulate DID. Results of patients seemed to indicate a pattern of inter-identity amnesia. Simulators, however, were able to mimic a pattern of inter-identity amnesia, rendering the results of patients impossible to interpret as either a pattern of (...) or a pattern of simulation. It is argued that studies not including DID-simulators or simulation-free memory tasks, should not be taken as evidence for amnesia in DID. (shrink)
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  20.  10
    Rebecca D. Burwell & Howard Eichenbaum (1999). What's New in Animal Models of Amnesia? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):446-447.
    In general, we endorse Aggleton & Brown's thesis that the neuroanatomy of amnesia comprises two functionally distinct systems, but we are disappointed in the lack of detail regarding the critical functional contribution of the hippocampus. We also take issue with the characterization of the cortical areas surrounding the hippocampus, particularly the decreased emphasis on the cortical input to the hippocampus.
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  21.  18
    R. Joseph (2003). Emotional Trauma and Childhood Amnesia. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):151-179.
    It has been reported that, on average, most adults recall first memories formed around age 3.5. In general, most first memories are positive. However, whether these first memories tend to be visual or verbal and whether the period for childhood amnesia (CA) is greater for visual or verbal or for positive versus negative memories has not been determined. Because negative, stressful experiences disrupt memory and can injure memory centers such as the hippocampus and amygdala, and since adults who were (...)
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  22.  8
    Bernard J. Baars & Katharine McGovern (1995). Steps Toward Healing: False Memories and Traumagenic Amnesia May Coexist in Vulnerable Populations. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):68-74.
    Child abuse is surely the most agonizing psychological issue of our time. We decry the tendency to polarize around the either-or dichotomy of "recovered versus false memories," when both are likely to occur. Memory researchers seem to generalize from the mild, one-shot stressors of the laboratory to the severe repeated traumas reported by abused populations, an inferential leap that is scientifically dubious. Naturalistic studies show some post-traumatic memory impairment ; dissociativity, such as emotional numbing, detachment, and the like; but also (...)
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  23.  4
    Caleb Henry Smith, David A. Oakley & John Morton (2013). Increased Response Time of Primed Associates Following an “Episodic” Hypnotic Amnesia Suggestion: A Case of Unconscious Volition. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1305-1317.
    Following a hypnotic amnesia suggestion, highly hypnotically suggestible subjects may experience amnesia for events. Is there a failure to retrieve the material concerned from autobiographical memory, or is it retrieved but blocked from consciousness? Highly hypnotically suggestible subjects produced free-associates to a list of concrete nouns. They were then given an amnesia suggestion for that episode followed by another free association list, which included 15 critical words that had been previously presented. If episodic retrieval for the first (...)
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  24.  13
    Robert G. Mair, Joshua A. Burk, M. Christine Porter & Jessica E. Ley (1999). Thalamic Amnesia and the Hippocampus: Unresolved Questions and an Alternative Candidate. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):458-459.
    Aggleton & Brown have built a convincing case that hippocampus-related circuits may be involved in thalamic amnesia. It remains to be established, however, that their model represents a distinct neurological system, that the distinction between recall and familiarity captures the roles of these pathways in episodic memory, or that there are no other systems that contribute to the signs of amnesia associated with thalamic disease.
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  25.  8
    Nicholas Capaldi (2009). Philosophical Amnesia. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84 (65):93-.
    Many Individuals currently identified within the academic world as ‘“professional” philosophers’ spend a great deal of time arguing about the meaning of their discipline. The situation has recently become so critical that the Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy , for example, self-consciously excludes the term ‘philosophy’ from its list of entries. An outsider might get the impression that members of the profession suffer from a recurrent kind of intellectual amnesia and need constantly to be reminded about who they are and (...)
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  26. Jean Curthoys (2003). Feminist Amnesia: The Wake of Women's Liberation. Routledge.
    _Feminist Amnesia_ is an important challenge to contemporary academic feminism. Jean Curthoys argues that the intellectual decline of university arts education and the loss of a deep moral commitment in feminism are related phenomena. The contradiction set up by the radical ideas of the 1960s, and institutionalised life of many of its protagonists in the academy has produced a special kind of intellectual distortion. This book criticises current trends in feminist theory from the perspective of forgotten and allegedly outdated feminist (...)
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  27. Jon Dorbolo (1987). Personal Amnesia. Dissertation, University of Oregon
    Across the lines of opposing Ethical theories extends a common conception of the moral point of view appropriately characterized as impartiality. Support for this characterization develops through discussion of Hobbes, Hume, Kant, and John Rawls. Modern moral philosophy is fixated on a range of problems ascribed to individual partiality. Ethical theories operate primarily in the realm of moral crisis, disregarding the details of people's lives and values. Ethical impartiality requries us to forget our selves and personal histories. This I oppose (...)
     
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  28. Alan J. Parkin (1997). Memory and Amnesia: An Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Memory and Amnesia: An Introduction provides a clear and comprehensive account of amnesia set in the context of our understanding of how normal memory operates. Part 1 provides the reader with an up-to-date survey of contemporary memory theories. Part 2 deals with amnesia, incorporating all important new developments, and focuses on the nature and explanation of the amnesic syndrome.
     
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  29.  3
    W. Glannon (2014). Anaesthesia, Amnesia and Harm. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (10):651-657.
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  30.  51
    Jeremy Wolfe (1999). Inattentional Amnesia. Journal of Mental Imagery 29 (3-4):71-94.
  31. Geraint Rees, C. Russell, Christopher D. Frith & Julia Driver (1999). Inattentional Blindness Versus Inattentional Amnesia for Fixated but Ignored Words. Science 286 (5449):2504-7.
  32. Daniel L. Schacter (1992). Consciousness and Awareness in Memory and Amnesia: Critical Issues. In A. David Milner & M. D. Rugg (eds.), The Neuropsychology of Consciousness. Academic Press
     
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  33.  33
    David Bzdak (2008). On Amnesia and Knowing-How. Techne 12 (1):36-47.
    In this paper, I argue that Stanley and Williamson’s 2001 account of knowledge-how as a species of knowledge-that is wrong. They argue that a claim such as “Hannah knows how to ride a bicycle” is true if and only if Hannah has some relevant knowledge-that. I challenge their claim by considering the case of a famous amnesic patient named Henry M. who is capable of acquiring and retaining new knowledge-how but who is incapable of acquiring and retaining new knowledge-that. In (...)
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  34.  3
    JoNell A. Usher & Ulric Neisser (1993). Childhood Amnesia and the Beginnings of Memory for Four Early Life Events. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 122 (2):155.
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  35.  12
    Sarasvati Buhrman (1997). Trance Types and Amnesia Revisited: Using Detailed Interviews to Fill in the Gaps. Anthropology of Consciousness 8 (1):10-21.
  36. Ali A. Mazrui (2000). Cultural Amnesia, Cultural Nostalgia and False Memory: Africa's Identity Crisis Revisited. African Philosophy 13 (2):87-98.
     
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  37.  20
    J. P. Aggleton, M. W. Brown, J. Bachevalier, J. K. Parkinson, E. C. Warburton, S. Corkin, D. G. Amaral, R. G. Gonzalez, V. Lerner & J. Margolin (2013). Understanding Amnesia–Is It Time to Forget HM? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22:425-466.
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  38. Michael D. Kopelman & Narinder Kapur (2002). The Loss of Episodic Memories in Retrograde Amnesia: Single-Case and Group Studies. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. OUP Oxford
     
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  39.  8
    Elliot Hirshman, Anthony Passannante & Jason Arndt (2001). Midazolam Amnesia and Conceptual Processing in Implicit Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (3):453.
  40.  6
    Z. Michael Nagy & Daniel J. Martin (1993). Hypothermia-Induced Retrograde Amnesia in Young and Adult Swiss Mice. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (3):225-228.
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  41.  19
    Irene McMullin (2011). The Amnesia of the Modern: Arendt on the Role of Memory in the Constitution of the Political. Philosophical Topics 39 (2):91-116.
    In this paper I consider the essential role that public memory plays in the establishment and maintenance of the political arena and its space of appearance. Without this space and the shared memory that allows it to appear, Hannah Arendt argues, transience and finitude would consume the excellence of word and deed—just as the "natural ruin of time" consumes its mortal performer. The modern era displays a kind of mnemonic failure, however, a situation arising not only from technological developments that (...)
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  42.  35
    Eric Eich, J. L. Reeves & R. L. Katz (1985). Anesthesia, Amnesia, and the Memory/Awareness Distinction. Anesthesia and Analgesia 64:1143-48.
  43.  8
    Marvin M. Chun (2005). Drug-Induced Amnesia Impairs Implicit Relational Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (8):355-357.
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  44. John F. Kihlstrom & Daniel L. Schacter (1990). Anesthesia, Amnesia, and the Cognitive Unconscious. In B. Bonke, W. Fitch, K. Millar, amnesia Anesthesia & 1990 the cognitive unconscious. (eds.), Memory and Awareness in Anesthesia. Swets & Zeitlinger
     
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  45.  8
    Stephen Hetherington (2014). Transient Global Amnesia and Kantian Perception. Think 13 (38):69-72.
    Kant's monumental Critique of Pure Reason (1781/1787) begins with his account of perception. Look around you. An experience is the result. You seem to see a chair and a person, say even perhaps of its content – are coming to you from the world, according to Kant. What else is involved?
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  46.  4
    Andrew Fraser (1984). Legal Amnesia: Modernism Versus the Republican Tradition in American Legal Thought. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1984 (60):15-52.
    Not so very long ago — that is to say during the late sixties and early seventies — most Left lawyers understood the law as an ideological and repressive force imposed upon oppressed individuals, groups and classes from without. Viewed from the eye of the political storm surrounding the antiwar and Black liberation struggles, the conclusion that the law was a prime instrument of ruling class hegemony seemed obvious. Before the bar of progressive opinion, radicals presented their indictment of the (...)
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  47.  5
    William P. Banks (1996). Korsakoff and Amnesia. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):22-26.
  48.  1
    John Dunn (1998). Implicit Memory and Amnesia. In K. Kirsner & G. Speelman (eds.), Implicit and Explicit Mental Processes. Lawrence Erlbaum 99--117.
  49.  3
    Moishe Gonzales (1985). Theoretical Amnesia. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1985 (65):163-170.
    Conventional wisdom has it that there is — or at least there ought to be — a correspondence between theoretical and political positions. But the very labelling of it as conventional wisdom already betrays its falsity. Sure enough, any careful examination of the record readily reveals that this correspondence hardly ever obtains. No such parallel can be drawn for the Hegelians who split into Right and Left wings with qualitatively different positions, e.g., the German Young Hegelians and the British neo-Hegelians (...)
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  50.  1
    A. Salazar, Vance S. Grafman J. & Ludlow Dillon J. D. (1986). Consciousness and Amnesia After Penetrating Head Injury: Neurology and Anatomy. Neurology 36:178-87.
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