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Profile: Amy Olberding (University of Oklahoma)
  1. Amy Olberding (2014). Dao Companion to the Analects. Springer.
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  2. Amy Olberding (2014). Subclinical Bias, Manners, and Moral Harm. Hypatia 29 (2):287-302.
    Mundane and often subtle forms of bias generate harms that can be fruitfully understood as akin to the harms evident in rudeness. Although subclinical expressions of bias are not mere rudeness, like rudeness they often manifest through the breach of mannerly norms for social cooperation and collaboration. At a basic level, the perceived harm of mundane forms of bias often has much to do with feeling oneself unjustly or arbitrarily cut out of a group, a group that cooperates and collaborates (...)
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  3. Amy Olberding (2013). Confucius' Complaints and the Analects' Account of the Good Life. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):417-440.
    The Analects appears to offer two bodies of testimony regarding the felt, experiential qualities of leading a life of virtue. In its ostensible record of Confucius’ more abstract and reflective claims, the text appears to suggest that virtue has considerable power to afford joy and insulate from sorrow. In the text’s inclusion of Confucius’ less studied and apparently more spontaneous remarks, however, he appears sometimes to complain of the life he leads, to feel its sorrows, and to possess some despair. (...)
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  4. Amy Olberding (2011). Moral Exemplars in the Analects: The Good Person is That. Routledge.
    Theory -- An origins myth for the Analects -- The Analects' silences -- Exemplarist elements in the Analects -- A total exemplar : Confucius -- A partial exemplar : Zilu -- A partial exemplar : Zigong -- Conclusion.
     
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  5. Amy Olberding (2011). Seneca and the Self. Ancient Philosophy 31 (2):460-463.
  6. Amy Olberding & Ivanhoe Philip J. (2011). Mortality in Traditional Chinese Thought. SUNY.
     
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  7. Amy Olberding (2009). “Ascending the Hall”: Style and Moral Improvement in the Analects. Philosophy East and West 59 (4):pp. 503-522.
    The moral vision of the "Analects" notably includes among our moral responsibilities the need to style behavior such that the propriety of one's dispositions is evident in one's manner and demeanor. While the sage effortlessly fulfills this responsibility, the moral learner must actively strive to shape her demeanor and manner. This essay considers her resources for doing so where becoming effortlessly sagely is a distant, if not unreachable, possibility. While the "Analects" clearly proffers the li as the principal mechanism for (...)
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  8. Amy Olberding (2008). "A Little Throat Cutting in the Meantime": Seneca's Violent Imagery. Philosophy and Literature 32 (1):pp. 130-144.
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  9. Amy Olberding (2008). Dreaming of the Duke of Zhou: Exemplarism and the Analects. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (4):625-639.
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  10. Amy Olberding (ed.) (2008). Newsletter on Asian and Asian-American Philosopher and Philosophies 8.1.
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  11. Amy Olberding (2007). The Educative Function of Personal Style in the "Analects". Philosophy East and West 57 (3):357 - 374.
    One of the central pedagogical strategies employed in the "Analects" consists in the suggestion of models worthy of emulation. The text's most robust models, the dramatic personae of the text, emerge as colorful figures with distinctive personal styles of action and behavior. This is especially so in the case of Confucius himself. In this essay, two particularly notable features of Confucius' style are considered. The first, what is termed "everyday" style, consists in Confucius' unusual command of conventional norms in ordinary (...)
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  12. Amy Olberding (2007). Sorrow and the Sage: Grief in the Zhuangzi. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):339-359.
    The Zhuangzi offers two apparently incompatible models of bereavement. Zhuangzi sometimes suggests that the sage will greet loss with unfractured equanimity and even aplomb. However, upon the death of his own wife, Zhuangzi evinces a sorrow that, albeit brief, fits ill with this suggestion. In this essay, I contend that the grief that Zhuangzi displays at his wife’s death better honors wider values averred elsewhere in the text and, more generally, that a sage who retains a capacity for sorrow will (...)
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  13. Amy Olberding (2005). "The Feel of Not to Feel It": Lucretius' Remedy for Death Anxiety. Philosophy and Literature 29 (1):114-129.
  14. Amy Olberding (2005). The 'Stout Heart'. Ancient Philosophy 25 (1):141-154.
  15. Amy Olberding (2004). The Consummation of Sorrow: An Analysis of Confucius' Grief for Yan Hui. Philosophy East and West 54 (3):279-301.
    : Throughout the Analects, Confucius describes the capacity for grief as an ethically valuable trait. Here his own display of grief at the premature death of his beloved student Yan Hui is investigated as a model of the meaning and significance of grief in a flourishing life. This display, it is argued, provides a valuable portrait, in situ, of the specific species of grief that Confucius sanctions and encourages. It likewise makes clear the role played by vulnerability to injury in (...)
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  16. Amy Olberding (1997). Mourning, Memory, and Identity. International Philosophical Quarterly 37 (1):29-44.
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